Undergraduate Courses

Body

The Department of English offers over 200 courses for undergraduate- and graduate-level students. These courses focus on a diverse array of topics from across the fields of American and British literature; world literature; critical and narrative theory; film, video game analysis and other areas of popular culture studies; rhetoric, composition and literacy; digital media studies; and folklore. We also offer creative writing workshops in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. 

For complete and accurate meeting days and times for courses of interest, and to register, please visit the Ohio State Master Course Schedule. The master schedule is maintained by University Registrar and includes information about Department of English courses offered across all of our campuses. While we make every effort to ensure that the information below is complete and correct, the link above is guaranteed to be so. 

Advanced
Text

AUTUMN 2020

Text

English 1109: Intensive Writing and Reading 
Instructor:
Staff 
Provides intensive practice in integrating academic reading and writing.


English 1110.01: First-Year English Composition 
Instructor:
Staff 
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers.

*Traditional and online sections available 
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1


English 1110.02: First-Year English Composition 
Instructor:
Staff 
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers. Taught with an emphasis on literary texts. 

GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1


English 1110.03 (10): First-Year English Composition 
Instructors
                                                                                                                                 

Sections 10 and 20 instructor: Christiane Buuck                                                                  

Section 30 instructor: Mira Kafantaris

Intensive practice in fundamentals of expository writing illustrated in the student's own writing and essays of professional writers; offered in a small class setting and linked with an individual tutoring component in its concurrent course, 1193. This course is available for EM credit only through the AP program. 

GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1 


English 1193: Individual Studies 
Instructor:
Martha Sims 
Intensive practice in the fundamentals of expository writing. 

Text

English 2150: Career Preparation for English and Related Majors 
Instructor:
Jenny Patton 
This course is designed for English and humanities students interested in exploring and preparing for their post-graduation career options. We will begin by reflecting on individual students' strengths and preferences and thinking about job activities and careers that might complement these. We also will examine specific work environments (e.g., corporations and nonprofits); the value of attending graduate or professional school; and the role that internships, undergraduate research and networking play in career development and advancement. In addition, we will look at how to organize and manage an internship/job search; how to put together strong resumes, cover letters and portfolios; and how to interview well over the phone, via Skype and in person.


English 2201: Selected Works of British Literature — Medieval through 1800 
Instructor:
Karen Winstead and Staff 
This survey will introduce students to the vibrant minds and culture that produced the masterpieces of our British literary heritage. Students will sample the writings of poets, playwrights, essayists and novelists including Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton and Johnson. Students will get to know the worlds they inhabited, the issues they cared about and how they may have thought about themselves as artists and human beings. While exploring the past, students will find surprising precedents for popular genres of our own day, including horror, romance and graphic narrative. 
English 2201 is a foundational course for English majors but it is also a rewarding experience for anyone seeking an appreciation of our literary heritage. Lectures will sketch out the contours of literary history and weekly recitations will provide opportunities for group close reading and discussion. Requirements include a final exam, a journal of responses to the readings and weekly online quizzes on the lectures. 

GE: Literature 
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English 2201H: Selected Works of British Literature — Medieval through 1800 
Instructor:
David Brewer 
This course will offer an introduction to the most exciting and memorable literature written in English prior to 1800, which is to say, prior to the invention of most of our standard ideas about literature. We will use the often unusual and provocative perspectives opened up by our engagement with this material both to think about how it worked in its own time and how it has shaped the world we now inhabit. In so doing, we will focus both upon the words themselves and the physical objects through which they have come down to us, drawing extensively on the holdings of our Rare Books and Manuscripts Library. Likely readings include portions of The Canterbury Tales, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Paradise Lost, Evelina, several darkly comic plays and some of the most moving poetry ever written. Course requirements will include a weekly reading journal, several short written exercises and active participation in both our discussions and our work with the collections of Rare Books. This course is open to non-honors students who are interested in deeply engaging with this literature and how it continues to work in the world. 

GE: Literature 
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English 2202H: Selected Works of British Literature — 1800 to Present 
Instructor:
Jill Galvan 

This course will introduce you to major British literary trends of the last two centuries. Class meetings will include both lecture and lots of discussion. Our texts will cover the Romantic, Victorian, modern and postcolonial periods, as well a bit of the twenty-first century. We'll talk about many major forms and movements - for example, the lyric, the Gothic, the dramatic monologue, aestheticism, the Bildungsroman and modernism. We'll also cover the cultural and historical phenomena that inform our texts, including the French Revolution, slavery and abolitionism, industrialization, imperialism, debates over gender roles, the rise of scientific values, the two world wars and decolonization. Finally, besides teaching you literary and cultural history, English 2202H will help you to become a better critical reader and literary analyst, either for future classes or for your own enjoyment. You'll practice reading texts with an eye for fine detail (a.k.a. close-reading or explicating) in order to construct logical, complex interpretations based on textual evidence. Some of our authors (tentative): William Blake, Mary Kingsley, Mary Wollstonecraft, John Keats, Christina Rossetti, Charlotte Bronte, Olive Schreiner, Oscar Wilde, Wilfred Owen, Virginia Woolf, Una Marson, Ngugi wa Thiong'o and Kazuo Ishiguro. Graded requirements (also tentative): regular and enthusiastic participation, three or four short response papers (1-2 pp. each), a term paper (5-7 pp.) and two exams. 

GE: Literature 
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English 2220 (10): Introduction to Shakespeare 
Instructors:
Hannibal Hamlin 

For four centuries now, William Shakespeare has been widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language. He’s certainly the most influential. More has been written about Shakespeare than any other writer in the history of the world, no joke. His plays have been adapted into countless other plays, novels, poems, music, paintings, films, TV shows and comics, and not only in English but in German, Russian, Spanish, Japanese, Hindi and Yoruba. We will read a sampling of Shakespeare’s plays in a variety of genres and over the course of his career. We’ll think about how his plays work as theater; how he adapts and transforms the source material on which so many of his plays depend; how Shakespeare can be such an “original” when he borrows so much from other writers; how he can create such deep and realistic characters; and how it is that Shakespeare can accomplish all of the above (and more) through language. What we’ll discover is that, as one critic put it, “the remarkable thing about Shakespeare is that he is really very good—in spite of all the people who say he is very good.”

We will read 4-5 plays, including some familiar ones (Twelfth Night and Macbeth) and some unfamiliar (King John and Pericles), as well as some non-dramatic poems. Assignments will include two short critical papers, a midterm test and a final exam.

GE: Literature 
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English 2220 (30): Introduction to Shakespeare 
Instructors:
Alan Farmer 
In this course we will read several plays written by Shakespeare and consider how they both conform to and work against the genres of comedy, tragedy, history and romance. Looking at the plays as works to be both performed and read, we will pay particular attention to the politics of gender, religion and kingship in the plays, topics that Shakespeare returned to again and again and that were vitally important, and indeed controversial, in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. In addition to some critical and historical essays on the early modern theater and culture, we will read some combination of the following plays: Henry V, Two Gentlemen of Verona, As You Like It, Much Ado About Nothing, Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar, The Tempest and The Winter's Tale. Requirements include a midterm exam, final exam, two essays (one shorter, one longer), regular attendance and active participation. 

GE: Literature 
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English 2220 (50): Introduction to Shakespeare 
Instructors:
Luke Wilson 
Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience. 

GE: Literature 
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English 2220H: Introduction to Shakespeare 
Instructor:
Jennifer Higginbotham 
In late sixteenth-century London, on the south bank of the Thames, amongst bear-baiting rings and brothels stood a round wooden theater that brought together people from all walks of life—aristocrats and merchants, cobblers and tailors, seamstresses and fishwives. It was for this space and for these people that William Shakespeare first wrote his influential plays, and in this course, we'll be imagining what it was like to stand with them and watch Shakespeare's theater in action. This particular honors section of Introduction to Shakespeare will be experimenting with cutting-edge techniques for facilitating embodied learning through the combination of rehearsal room techniques modeled on professional theater companies with close textual analysis of Shakespeare's language. Our in-depth exploration will include selected comedies and tragedies, a few poems and a lot of fun along the way. 

GE: Literature 
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English 2260 (20): Introduction to Poetry 
Instructor: 
Zoe Thompson 
Designed to help students understand and appreciate poetry through an intensive study of a representative group of poems.

GE: Literature 


English 2260 (30): Introduction to Poetry 
Instructor: 
Hannibal Hamlin
Dylan Thomas said that poetry was what made his toenails twinkle, Carl Sandburg that a poem was an echo asking a shadow dancer to be a partner, and Marianne Moore that poems were imaginary gardens with real toads in them. What are poems really, how do they work, and how should we read them? This GE literature course will focus on short, lyric poems in English from the middle ages to the present, exploring the different things poems do, the different forms they take and sounds they make and the experience of reading them. We’ll also work on talking and writing about them. We’ll discuss forms like sonnets, ballads, sestinas, villanelles and pantoums, as well as the peculiar thing known as “free verse.” We’ll read elegies, pastorals, hymns, satires, epistles and odes. And we’ll encounter many poets, including William Shakespeare, John Donne, John Keats, Emily Dickinson, Gerard Manley Hopkins, e.e. cummings, Robert Frost, Elizabeth Bishop, Sylvia Plath, Seamus Heaney, Derek Walcott and a crowd of others.

GE: Literature 


English 2260 (40): Introduction to Poetry 
Instructor:
Clare Simmons 
This course, which fulfills the General Education literature requirement, will provide an introduction to the types and forms of poetry in English, with a particular emphasis on the ways that poems represent the variety and diversity of human experience.  Students will have the opportunity to read a wide selection of poems and to practice skills in close reading, analyzing, discussing and writing about literary works. The main texts will be a selection of classic poems available through Carmen; and The Penguin Anthology of Twentieth-Century American Poetry.  Students will be responsible for regular attendance and participation in classroom discussion and group activities; a reading journal; a final portfolio project developed from the reading journal; quizzes; and mid-term and final exams.

GE: Literature


English 2261: Introduction to Fiction 
Instructors:
Staff 
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.

GE: Literature


English 2261 (Session 2): Introduction to Fiction — Game of Thrones as Literature 
Instructors:
Elizabeth Renker 
This class, for which all class sessions will be conducted via Zoom during our scheduled class period, celebrates the conclusion to a beloved HBO series.  Even the most dedicated fans might not realize that Game of Thrones is also a skilled and complex work of literature.  This class will train you in core analytical methods that will enable newcomers to the series as well as longstanding fans to understand Game of Thrones at a deeper level of richness and pleasure.  You will learn the core skills of literary interpretation without a lot of heavy reading assignments, and you will see very quickly how meaningful and helpful they are in achieving a deeper understanding of Game of Thrones. All students are required to watch the entire series before our class begins.  Our class sessions will focus on the first two seasons, but it will also presume knowledge of the entire series.  (We will not read or discuss the books by George R.R. Martin.)  You will re-watch, and read the transcript for, one episode per class period.  During our class meetings, we will discuss the day’s episode and I will guide you through applying the analytical method we are learning.  Components of your grade: daily attendance for class; preparation of daily homework questions; short daily quizzes about the homework; high-participation activities in class; and three exams conducted on Carmen, of which the two highest grades will count.  Textbooks: an HBO subscription; additional readings posted on Carmen. 

GE: Literature 


English 2261H: Introduction to Fiction 
Instructors:
Zoe Thompson 
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations; comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included. 

GE: Literature 


English 2263: Introduction to Film 
Instructor:
Ryan Friedman and Staff 
This course familiarizes students with the basic building blocks of film, the forms that movies use to tell stories, move viewers emotionally, communicate complex ideas and dramatize social conflicts. It also introduces students to significant developments in film history and ways of approaching film interpretation. Our primary goal in Introduction to Film is to become skilled at thinking, talking and writing critically about movies and, in the process, to deepen our appreciation and understanding of the film medium. 

GE: VPA 


English 2264: Introduction to Popular Culture Studies 
Instructors

Section 10 instructor: Joanna Toy 

Section 20 instructor: Staff  

Introduction to the analysis of popular culture texts.

GE: Cultures & Ideas. 
*This is a combined section class. Cross-listed in CompStd.


English 2265: Introductory Fiction Writing 
Instructor:
Macey Phillips
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition of fiction writing. We will write short stories and provide feedback in the form of biweekly workshops during which we will analyze and discuss student work. We will also study published stories by well-regarded authors.


English 2266 (20): Introductory Poetry Writing 
Instructor:
Neomi Chao 
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, composition and practice in the writing of poetry. In this course, we’ll read and analyze poems by various established poets and discuss student work as well. No prior experience needed. 


English 2267: Introduction to Creative Writing—3 Genre
Instructor:
Maya McOmie 
An introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction. Analysis and discussion of student work, with reference to the general methods and scope of all three genres.
The purpose of this class is to introduce you to writing as an artistic practice. We will be establishing a foundation in three genres: creative nonfiction, poetry and fiction. We will begin by approaching each genre as readers, analyzing works by great writers to figure out exactly what they’re doing and how they do it. The aim is not to imitate these writers and try to sound like them, but rather to uncover tricks and tools you can learn from, use, borrow and steal to help you sound more like yourself.
The rest of the time, our class will be a workshop. This means you will read your peers’ writing closely, offering sincere and engaged feedback in the form of both written responses and in-class discussion. Likewise, you’ll share your own writing with the class and get the chance to see your work from the perspective of a committed, generous, keen-eyed readership.
The goal of this class is to go broad in order to get narrow: you will expand your range of skills across multiple genres—pushing yourself to be curious, fearless and voracious—as a way of getting closer to understanding both who you already are as a writer, and who you might want to become.


English 2268 : Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing 
Instructor:
 Louise Edwards 
Creative nonfiction is one of the broadest literary classifications, encompassing forms such as the personal essay, memoir, literary journalism, travel writing, historical narrative and the lyric essay. What does unite the diverse manifestations of this genre is the presence of the writer on the page — exploring, asking questions and framing subject matter for the reader.
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition of creative nonfiction. You’ll write creative nonfiction, discuss and analyze your own work and your classmate’s work in a workshop format and read a variety of essays and works by published authors of creative nonfiction. Readings will emphasize a wide variety of voices in particular people of color, voices from the LGBTQ community, women and those who come from an intersection of marginalized identities. 


English 2269: Digital Media Composing 
Instructor:
Staff 
A composition course in which students analyze and compose digital media texts while studying complex forms and practices of textual production. 

GE: VPA 


English 2270: Introduction to Folklore 
Instructor:
Staff 
Folklore theory and methods explored through engagement with primary sources: folktale, legend, jokes, folksong, festival, belief, art. 

GE: Cultures & Ideas 


English 2270H: Introduction to Folklore 
Instructor:
Katherine Borland 
This class explores forms of traditional, vernacular culture—including verbal art, custom and material culture—shared by people from a number of regional, ethnic, religious and occupational groups. We will consider various interpretive, theoretical approaches to examples of folklore and folklife, and we will investigate the history of folklore studies. Recurring central issues will include the dynamics of tradition, the nature of creativity and artistic expression and the construction of group identities. Folklore theory and methods will be explored through readings and an independent collecting project, where students will gather folklore from their home town or the college campus. Students will interview people for stories and other oral forms, and will document cultural practices through photographs, drawings and fieldnotes. Final collecting projects will be accessioned in the Student Ethnographic Collection at the Center for Folklore Studies Archives. Make your mark documenting the expressive culture you know most intimately and that you value most and expand the consultable record of human experience. 

*This is a combined section class. Cross-listed in CompStd 
GE: Cultures & Ideas 


English 2277: Introduction to Disability Studies 
Instructors 

Section 10 instructor: Elizabeth Miller 

Section 20 (*online section*) instructor: Jessie Male 

Foundational concepts and issues in disability studies; introduction to the sociopolitical models of disability. 

GE: Cultures & Ideas 


English 2281: Introduction to African American Literature 
Instructor:
Staff 
A study of representative literary works by African American writers from 1760 to the present. 

GE: Literature 
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.) 
*This is a combined section class. Cross-listed in AfAmASt 


English 2291: U.S. Literature: 1865 to Present 
Instructors:
Brian McHale & Staff 
This course provides a broad survey of American literature over more than a century and a half, from the aftermath of the Civil War to the new millennium.  Examining a wide range of fiction, nonfiction, poetry and drama, the course studies literary engagements with such historical and cultural phenomena as post-Civil War Reconstruction; the expanding social, economic and cultural networks of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; immigration and internal migration; race and regional identity; the two World Wars and other armed conflicts of the twentieth century; and the increasingly rapid pace of social and technological changes over the last 75 years. Our investigation of literary responses and influences will include attention to such literary genres, trends and movements as the short story, the emergence of new forms of poetry, realism and its variants, modernism and postmodernism.  

GE: Literature 


English 2367.01: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience 
Instructors:
Staff 
Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America. 

GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two) 
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.) 


English 2367.02: Literature in the U.S. Experience 
Instructor:
Staff 
Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience. 

GE: Literature 
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two) 
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.) 


English 2367.03: Documentary in the U.S. Experience 
Instructor:
Staff 
An intermediate course that extends and refines skills in critical reading and expository writing through analysis of written texts, video and documentaries. 

GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two) 


English 2367.05: The U.S. Folk Experience 
Instructor:
Staff 
Concepts of American folklore and ethnography; folk groups, tradition and fieldwork methodology; how these contribute to the development of critical reading, writing and thinking skills. 

GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.) 
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two) 


English 2367.06: Composing Disability in the U.S. 
Instructor:
Staff 
Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America. 
Only one decimal subdivision of English 2367 may be taken for credit.  

GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.) 
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)


English 2367.08: The U.S. Experience: Writing about Video Games

Instructor: Staff 
Emphasizes persuasive and researched writing, revision and composing in various forms and media. Focusing on digital literacy, development of critical thinking skills and skill in producing analytical prose, students explore key conversations in the field of game studies and analyze a variety of types of video game writing. No prior knowledge of video games or game studies is required. 

GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two) 


English 2463: Introduction to Video Games Analysis 
Instructor:
Staff 
An introduction to humanities-based methods of analyzing and interpreting video games in terms of form, genre, style and theory. No background in video game play is necessary. All students will have regular opportunities for hands-on experience with different game types and genres in both the computer-based classroom and the Department of English Video Game Lab. 

GE: VPA 


English 2464: Introduction to Comics Studies 
Instructor:
Frederick Aldama 
We will learn the language of comics from around the world and the concepts for their study. We will discover comics as a storytelling form grown within specific nationally identified geographic regions with their own styles (U.S. alternative and mainstream as well as manga, for instance) as well as to show how they exist within a world system of comics that includes cross-pollinations and influences with fine arts, films, TV and alphabetic narrative. Along the way, we will ask questions such as: Why tell this story in comics form? What can comics as a storytelling form do that, say, a film or novel can't do? We will learn how to analyze comics and learn about archival research at Ohio State's Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum. No background in comics is required. Requirements will include reading/viewing of comics, 3 papers (5-7pp each) and discussion. 

GE: VPA 

Text

English 3271: Structure of the English Language 
Instructors 

Sections 10 and 20 instructor: Clarissa Surek-Clark 

Section 30 (*online section*) instructor: Gabriella Modan 
Students learn basic characteristics of English linguistics focusing on the basic building blocks of language: the sounds of English and how they are put together, word formation processes and rules for combining words into utterances/sentences. Students investigate and explore linguistic variation, accents of American English and the implications of language evaluation in educational settings. 

GE: Cultures & Ideas 


English 3304: Business and Professional Writing 
Instructor:
Staff 
The study of principles and practices of business and professional writing. 


English 3305: Technical Writing 
Instructor:
Staff 
Study of principles and practices of technical writing. Emphasis on the style, organization and conventions of technical and research reports, proposals, memoranda, professional correspondence, etc. 


English 3331: Thinking Theoretically 
Instructor:
Sandra MacPherson 
In this course we will think theoretically about the relationship between human and non-human Beings/beings. What grounds the difference between one kind of existence and another? What distinguishes the human body from that of other animals? What distinguishes organic bodies from other forms of organized matter—crystals, puddings, viruses, statues, robots, penknives? For some thinkers, the answer to the first question has been that humans are a “higher” form of animal because of our cognitive abilities—our capacity for language and memory, for making tools and art. But research increasingly suggests that Neanderthals used tools and made art, and that primates use tools and language. Moreover, other creatures clearly communicate amongst themselves and even with us, though we don’t tend to call this “language.” If language is merely a shared system of signs, however, why isn’t the family dog using language when she sits when we ask her to? What is a parrot doing when she is saying she wants a cracker? What are we doing when we say we want one? The law has increasingly been willing to grant certain kinds of non-human animals the status of legal persons, endowed with rights and protections. What about trees? Should we not protect these natural objects on which the human species depends for breath and shelter? If corporations have rights, why not water systems? We live in a world organized on the one hand around a pervasive interface of human and machine, and on the other around a growing understanding of the human as a geologic force. How might contemporary developments in robotics, climate change, genetic engineering and animal rights require us to rethink the special status of the human animal? We will pursue this question through a range of theoretical, philosophical, scientific, historical and aesthetic accounts of the human from the eighteenth century to the present. This would be a great course for those interested in science fiction, environmental humanities and human rights, along with anyone needing to fulfill a critical theory requirement.

Possible theoretical texts include selections from Rene Descartes’ Treatise on Man (1664), Julien Offray de la Mettrie’s Machine Man (1747), Charles Darwin’s The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals (1874); Sigmund Freud’s Beyond the Pleasure Principle (1920); Michel Foucault’s The Order of Things (1966); Elizabeth Anscombe’s “The First Person” (1974) and “Were You a Zygote” (1984); Peter Singer’s Animal Liberation (1975); Donna Haraway’s Crystals, Fabrics, and Fields (1976) and Primate Visions (1989); David Chalmers’ “Facing Up to the Problem of Consciousness” (1995); Bruno Latour’s Reassembling the Social (2005); Jane Bennett’s Vibrant Matter (2009); and Christine Korsgaard’s Fellow Creatures (2018). Possible literary texts include J. M. Coetzee’s Slow Man (2005), Sigrid Nunez’ The Friend (2018), a selection of georgic poetry, Blade Runner (1982) and Blade Runner 2049, Robert Bresson’s film Au Hazard Balthazar (1966), and paintings by Jean-Siméon Chardin, Anne Valleyer-Coster, J.M. Turner, John Constable, Piet Mondrian, Agnes Martin and Cindy Wright. 


English 3361: Narrative and Medicine 
Instructor:
Antonio Ferraro 

Illness generates stories. Whether from patients, caregivers or loved one, stories of illness are everywhere, informing our sense of what it means to suffer, to adjust to altered and disabled bodies, and to seek comfort and relief. In this class we'll explore, through close examinations of novels, essays, films, poems and other media, the many ways illness narratives intervene in our shared and individual conceptions of illness. Further, by drawing on our different personal and academic experiences, we'll explore how improving our narrative competencies, or the different ways we respond to and create narratives, can inform our medical competencies, or the ways we give and receive health care.

GE: Literature 


English 3364: Special Topics in Popular Culture 
Instructor:
Jared Gardner 
This course will study the long and varied tradition of true crime narratives, from early gallows confessions through ballads, novels, comics, memoirs, radio, podcasts and film. Beginning with tales of witches and violence that so captivated their seventeenth-century audiences, to Victorian serial murderers like Jack the Ripper, to modern celebrity crimes and criminals, we will ask why writers and readers so often turn to blood, violence and malfeasance as the stuff of art, entertainment and cultural criticism. 

GE: Cultures & Ideas 


English 3372 (10): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy—Children's Fantasy Novels 
Instructor:
Jesse Schotter 
This class will survey some of the most important children's fantasy novelists of the 20th century, from E. Nesbit and C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien up through Lloyd Alexander, Ursula K. LeGuin, J.K. Rowling, Diana Wynne Jones, and N.K. Jemisin.  We will examine how these two genres--fantasy and children's lit--grew up together, and will explore the varying influences on these writers, from myth and folklore to Christianity and Taoism and Existentialism to feminism and critical race theory. 

*This is an online section 
GE: Literature 


English 3372 (20): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy 
Instructor:
Staff 

Introduction to the tradition and practice of speculative writing. Provides students the opportunity to examine and compare works of science fiction and/or fantasy. 

GE: Literature 


English 3372 (40): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy 
Instructor:
Brian McHale 
If you regularly read science fiction and watch sf films and consider yourself a knowledgeable fan, or if you only occasionally read or watch sf, or if you never read sf and seldom watch sf films—whichever of these categories you belong to, this course is for you! Its purpose is to give you tools for thinking, speaking and writing about sf. Our primary concern won't be sf's history, its marketing and readership, or even its ideas—though all of these things will come into the picture, of course. Our main focus, however, will be on how sf is made—its form. We'll explore questions such as, what distinguishes science fiction from other types of fiction, including fantasy? How are science fiction novels (and films) constructed? How do we get from sentences on a page (or shots in a film) to worlds in the imagination? Specific topics will include the future, the alien and world-building. What does it mean to imagine the future? When we try to do so, are we really just imagining versions of the present? What about aliens? Are they really just versions of ourselves, after all, ourselves in a funhouse mirror, or can we imagine something that is genuinely, radically not-us? What is involved in building a world? Why go to the trouble of building one, when there is a well-made and perfectly usable one all around us? Readings: classic sf short stories from The Big Book of Science Fiction, edited by Ann and Jeff Vandermeer (available in print and e-book); screenings of sf films. Assignments: 6 in-class quizzes, 6 brief response papers (2-3 pages each), one longer paper (5-8 pages) 

GE: Literature 


English 3372 (50): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy—Environmental Sci-Fi and Fantasy 
Instructor:
Thomas Davis 
Science Fiction and fantasy often take us to places with weird environments, including future Earths, bizarre dreamscapes, and other planets.  In recent years, sci-fi and fantasy works have begun directly addressing the crises of climate change, the sixth mass extinction and the uncertain prospects for human life on an altered planet.  This class examines the ways environmental sci-fi/fantasy novels, short fiction and film narrate planetary change and what that means for human and nonhuman futures.  Students will read from read and view a diverse set of sci-fi/fantasy fiction, ranging from intergalactic epics, Afrofuturism, weird fiction and the recent subgenre cli-fi.  Students will also get a chance to build their own environmental sci-fi/fantasy worlds.  Texts and films may include: H.G. Wells The Time Machine; Ursula K. Le Guin The Dispossessed; Octavia Butler The Parable of the Sower; Jeff VanderMeer Borne; China Mieville Three Moments of an Explosion (selected stories); Louise Erdrich Future Home of the Living God; Alex DiFrancesco All City; Emmi Itäranta Memory of Water; Omar El Akkad American War; Mad Max; Snowpiercer. 

GE: Literature 


English 3378: Special Topics in Film and Literature—Film and Comics: Race, Class, Sexuality and Differently Abled 
Instructor:
Frederick Aldama 
Have you ever wondered why you love watching superhero movies or reading comics? Why do we pay money to go see something that we know is clearly not real? This course examines the art of film and comics storytelling and, simultaneously, the emotion and cognitive responses that they trigger. We will focus on the contemporary period to see how filmmakers and comic book creators build their storyworlds as well as audience consumption. We will also explore the cross-pollination of devices used to give shape to filmic and comic book storytelling modes. We will acquire theoretical concepts and tools to understand better how our set of films and comics are built and how they might make (or not) new our perception, thought and feeling concerning issues of racism, ableism, misogyny, homophobia and the like. 

We will view and analyze: Patty Jenkins's Wonder Woman (2017); Jon Favreau's Iron Man (2008); Christopher Nolan's Batman Begins (2005), The Dark Knight (2008), The Dark Knight Rises (2012); M. Night Shyamalan's Unbreakable (2000); Guillermo del Toro's Pacific Rim (2013); Danny Boyle's 28 Days Later (2002); James Mangold's Logan (2017); Zack Snyder's Justice League (2017); Ryan Coogler's Black Panther (2018); Taika Waititi's Thor: Ragnarok (2017); Edgar Wright's Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (2010); Bob Persichetti et al.: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (2018); Jill Thompson's Wonder Woman: The True Amazon (2016); George Miller et al.: Mad Max: Fury Road (2015); Bryan Lee O'Malley's Scott Pilgrim vs. the World Vol. 1 (2004); Steve Niles's 28 Days Later: Aftermath; Travis Beacham's Pacific Rim: Tales from the Drift (2016); Ta-Nehisi Coates's Black Panther & the Crew (2017). 

GE: Cultures & Ideas 


English 3378: Special Topics in Film and Literature—Shakespeare's Tragedies on Film 
Instructor:
Luke Wilson 

This course will study four or five tragedies by Shakespeare in conjunction with important film versions.  Possible plays: Hamlet; Othello; Titus Andronicus; King Lear; Romeo and Juliet; Coriolanus

GE: Cultures & Ideas 


English 3379: Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy 
Instructors 

Section 10 instructor: James Fredal 

Section 20 instructor: John Jones 
Introduction to the interrelated fields of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy, familiarizing students with key concepts that underlie work in these interrelated fields and to the scholarly methods of WRL. Together, this discipline studies the ways people use language and other symbols to convey messages, persuade audiences and create meaning, and how these practices are learned and taught. 


English 3398 (10): Methods for the Study of Literature 
Instructor:
Jill Galvan 
This course is designed to strengthen skills in interpretive reading and writing. It will help students with English major courses and also with analyzing texts generally, beyond the classroom. Our focus will be on reading with an eye for fine detail and constructing logical, well-evidenced arguments. The syllabus will cover the major genres—novel, short story, poetry, performance (drama and film), and possibly memoir—and will range from the classic to the contemporary. A very tentative and partial author list includes Herman Melville, Robert Louis Stevenson, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Kate Chopin, Raymond Carver, Octavia Butler, Justin Torres, Carmen Machado and Trevor Noah. In class, I will be providing guidance, terminology and a critical framework, but most meetings will be run as active discussions. Tentative assignments: two papers, 3-5 pages each; two papers, 5-7 pages each; a critical research exercise; regular reading quizzes; and engaged class participation. 


English 3398 (30): Methods for the Study of Literature 
Instructor:
Susan Williams
What is literature? How does it work? How do we read and make sense of it? How do we talk and write about it? This course will focus on the close reading of a variety of different kinds of literature, considering especially matters of literary history, genre and form, as well as the interconnected roles of authors, texts and readers, and exploring all the many ways in which novels, poems and plays make meaning. This will not be “How to read literature like a professor,” but how to read literature like a really good reader, and perhaps also, how to read literature like a writer, from the inside out. Literary works will include Shakespeare’s play Hamlet, Dickens’ novel Great Expectations, the poems of Elizabeth Bishop and Anne Carson’s weird whatever-it-is The Autobiography of Red. We will also read a variety of critical essays on these works, representing different theoretical and methodological perspectives. Evaluation will be based on participation in discussion, short assignments and four essays.


English 3398 (70): Methods for the Study of Literature 
Instructor:
Roxann Wheeler 
Serves as the "Methods" course for the Literature and Creative Writing concentrations within the English major. Its purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing. Required of English majors. Open to English majors only or others by dept permission. 


English 3465 (30): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing—Writing Against Convention 
Instructor:
Adam Luhta 

Literature is considered a storytelling medium, but what sets it apart from other forms of artistic expression is the capacity to render consciousness through voice. In this course, students will examine and hone their individual authorial voices through discussion of short stories, novel excerpts and flash fiction by a diverse set of classic and contemporary writers. Students will also produce and workshop 1-2 substantial pieces of writing. Readings will be drawn from the work of Lucia Berlin, E.M. Forster, Marlon James, Diane Williams, Toni Morrison, Vi Khi Nao, Flannery O'Connor, Kurt Vonnegut and others. 


English 3465 (20): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing—Writing Against Convention 
Instructor: Michelle Herman
 
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing fiction. This section's special topic will be characterization (and motivation, which goes hand in hand with it). We'll focus on in-depth practice in creating fully believable, three-dimensional characters.


English 3466: Special Topics in Intermediate Poetry Writing 
Instructor:
Alyssa Froehling 
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing poetry. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored. 


English 3467S: Issues and Methods in Tutoring Writing 
Instructor:
Beverly Moss 
English/CSTW 3467s focuses on theories and practices in tutoring writing.  The aim of this course is to prepare undergraduates to work with writers from diverse backgrounds and disciplines.  This class provides a unique opportunity for its members to learn about composition theory and pedagogy, tutoring strategies and writing center theories and practices in order to put these theories and practices to work in classroom and writing center settings.  Students will apprentice as writing consultants/tutors in the University Writing Center.  Therefore, in addition to our regularly scheduled class time, each person enrolled in this course will spend approximately one hour per week in the Writing Center. In addition to your observations, you will be expected to complete a semester-long research project. This course is particularly helpful to those who are planning careers as teachers or who are enrolling in the professional writing minor (3467 is an elective for the  writing minor). 

*Cross-listed in ArtsSci 


English 3468: Special Topics in Intermediate Creative Nonfiction Writing 
Instructor:
Staff 
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing creative nonfiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored. 


English 3662: An Introduction to Literary Publishing 
Instructor:
Kamal Kimball 
An introduction to the theory and practice of editing and publishing literature. 

Text

English 4150: Cultures of Professional Writing 
Instructors 

Section 10 instructor: Jennifer Patton 

Section 20 instructor: Daniel Seward 

Section 30 instructor: Christiane Buuck 
Examine writing in various workplaces. Analyze writing discourse that shapes professional organizations. Explore ongoing technological and cultural shifts required of workplace writers and the role of digital media. 


English 4189: Professional Writing Minor—Capstone Internship 
Instructor:
Jennifer Patton 
Students work on-site in an organization doing writing-related work and meet weekly to discuss related topics. 


English 4515: Chaucer 
Instructor:
Ethan Knapp 
The aim of this course will be to introduce students to the poetry of one of the greatest of English writers, Geoffrey Chaucer, starting with his early works and leading up to a reading of large sections of his most famous poem, The Canterbury Tales. Chaucer's poetry offers a window onto an usually exciting moment of political, cultural and philosophical transformations, and we will read these poems with close attention to the society and culture in which they were produced.  Students will also acquire a familiarity with Chaucer's Middle English. 


English 4520.01: Shakespeare 
Instructor:
Jennifer Higginbotham 
This course will explore the formal, social and political engagements of Shakespeare's plays. It will pay particular attention to how his plays conform to and work against the genres of comedy, tragedy, history and romance, and to how they represent such issues as gender, sexuality, religion, race and political power.  In addition to some critical and historical essays on the early modern theater and culture, we will likely read some combination of the following plays: Richard III, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Much Ado About Nothing, Measure for Measure, Romeo and Juliet, Othello, King Lear, The Winter and Pericles. Requirements include two essays, a midterm exam, a final exam, regular attendance and active participation. 
Assigned texts: I will order a selection of modern editions of the plays on the syllabus. Any modern edition you purchase must have line numbers, glosses of difficult words and longer explanatory notes. Good editions of single plays are published by Cambridge, Oxford and Arden, as well as by Folger, Pelican, Norton, Bedford, Bantam and Signet. Reputable one-volume editions of all of Shakespeare's plays are published by Longman, Pelican, Riverside, Norton and Oxford. 


English 4520.02: Shakespeare—Q1 Hamlet: Shakespeare, Criticism and Performance (Synchronous Online)
Instructor:
Sarah Neville 

Did you know there are three texts of Hamlet? This Special Topics course is designed to give students an opportunity to explore the relationship between literary texts, criticism and performance through a deep investigation into one of the most discussed – and controversial – texts in the English language. Students in this course will study the theatrical and critical history of the 1603 text of Shakespeare’s Hamlet, which famously has Hamlet uttering not, “To be or not to be, that is the question”, but “To be or not to be – ay, there’s the point.” In figuring out how this early version of Shakespeare’s play could have been displaced by the later but better-known version of 1604-5, students in 4520.02 will explore topics like Renaissance books in print, theories of textual transmission, performance criticism, theatre reviewing and Shakespeare’s use of popular and historical sources. Our weekly class work will be a mix of synchronous and asynchronous discussion, short writing assignments, and guided discovery. Approximately 65% of the class will be conducted synchronously during the assigned class time.

Complementing these traditional classroom activities, Lord Denney’s Players, the theatre company of the English department, is producing a documentary film about the three texts of Hamlet in November 2020, and students in 4520.02 will form the film’s production team. All work on the film will be completed remotely to conform with safe social distancing guidelines. As part of their class assessment, students will work to explain central textual and performance variants between the Hamlet texts as part of an “act” of the documentary. In consultation with the professor, student groups will direct their act’s initial concept and script development, conduct and film interviews, adapt relevant illustrative scenes, determine those scenes’ casting, costumes, lighting and sound design and explain how these choices fit into their act’s overall dramaturgy. The combination of the LDP documentary and students’ individual work in the class will serve as a joint “laboratory” to test some of the claims Shakespeare critics have made about the performability of Shakespeare’s 1603 Hamlet text, providing a lasting resource for other students and scholars of Shakespeare. All students in ENGL 4520.02 will take part in (and receive credit for) the making of the Hamlet film but they may choose whether or not they ultimately appear onscreen in the finished product.


English 4540: Nineteenth-Century British Poetry 
Instructor:
Jacob Risinger 
Set down on a darkling plain, Romantic and Victorian poets raged against the dying of the light. In this course, we will explore poets who tried to make sense of the nineteenth century and its tumultuous changes. Poets ranging from Wordsworth to Oscar Wilde were some of the first writers to grapple with the modern world as we know it.  Their century was rocked by the invention of the train, the telegraph, the photograph and the bicycle. The industrial revolution gave rise to a broad but unpredictable social realignment and Darwin's evolutionary hypothesis disrupted religious convictions and comfortable visions of nature. Revolutionary political ideas prompted the reconsideration of tradition, custom and order. As the British Empire expanded to cover a quarter of the globe, both the Romantics and the Victorians confronted an increasing disjunction between local culture and a globalized world. Over the course of the semester, we will think about how these developments resulted in the formal and thematic transformation of British poetry. 


English 4543: 20th-Century British Fiction—Fiction and Politics at the End of the British World System 
Instructor:
Thomas Davis 
This course examines a wide range of fiction produced from locations that made up the British world system: the British Isles, Africa, the Caribbean and Asia.  We will be concerned primarily with the way literary texts register historical and political tensions and, sometimes, get marshaled directly for political ends. Our readings will take us through the various ways literature engages questions of empire, racism, gender and sexuality, fascism, war, and immigration. To address the relationship of aesthetics and politics, we will consider the formal dimensions of texts—figural language, emplotment, characterization, perspective, generic fidelity and infidelity—as encryptions of the multiple historical antagonisms that led to Britain's slow descent from atop the world-system over the course of the twentieth century.  Texts may include: Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway; Christopher Isherwood's Goodbye to Berlin; Elizabeth Bowen's The Demon Lover and Other Stories; George Orwell's 1984; Samuel Selvon's The Lonely Londoners; J.G. Ballard's The Drowned World; Doris Lessing's The Grass is Singing; Ali Smith's Autumn. 


English 4550: Special Topics in Colonial and Early National Literature of the U.S.—Alexander Hamilton's World 
Instructor:
Elizabeth Hewitt 
The popularity of Lin-Manuel Miranda's Hamilton has turned the "ten dollar founding father" into something of a household name. This class will use Hamilton's life—as immigrant, soldier, revolutionary, architect of American finance and husband—as a lens to view various stories told about the early United States. We will consider the interdisciplinary relationships between economic, political and imaginative writing in the eighteenth century (a relationship that is also crucial to Miranda’s musical). And we will study the partisan divides (especially over Federal authority, slavery and public finance) that shaped the first decade of the nation. We will read novels, essays, autobiographies, poetry and political treatises by authors including: Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, Phillis Wheatley, Susanna Rowson, Olaudah Equiano, James Madison, Charles Brockden Brown, Judith Sargent Murray, Quobna Ottobah Cuguono and Royall Tyler. 


English 4555: Rhetoric and Legal Argumentation 
Instructor:
James Fredal 
Examines legal argumentation as a specialized type of rhetorical discourse; considers the relationship between rhetoric and legal discourse from historical, theoretical and practical perspectives; covers key concepts in rhetorical theory and explores their relevance for analyzing and producing legal arguments; students apply theory in analysis and production of spoken and written legal arguments. 


English 4563: Contemporary Literature—Literature 1945 to the Present 
Instructor:
Jessica Prinz 
We will read broadly in the area of 20th and 21st Century fiction, focusing on the theme of science. 
Although "science fiction" is a genre devoted to science and its  fusion with literature, we will be looking at other genres as well, as we explore some of the central concerns of the period. 
Among works that may be considered are: Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go; Zadie Smith, White Teeth; Egan, A Visit from the Goon Squad; Delillo, White Noise;  Calvino, If on a Winter's Night a Traveler; Eggers, The Circle; Lightman, Einstein's Dreams; Benedict, The Other Einstein.  No prior knowledge of contemporary science or literature is required. 


English 4565: Advanced Fiction Writing 
Instructor:
Nick White 
This is the advanced creative writing workshop in fiction. Admission is limited to creative writing concentrators who have taken English 2265, and to other students who have successfully completed English 2265 with permission of the instructor by portfolio submission. 


English 4566: Advanced Poetry Writing 
Instructor:
Marcus Jackson 
Each meeting, we will workshop your poems. In addition, we will be reading and discussing the aesthetic choices made in selections of published poetry (distributed via handouts and our Carmen page). Also, we will make efforts to become familiar with the poets and books that are guiding our current writing, thereby giving us more informed perspectives from which to critique weekly drafts. 


English 4568: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing 
Instructor:
Elissa Washuta 

This is the advanced creative writing workshop in creative nonfiction. Admission is limited to creative writing concentrators who have taken English 2268, and to other students who have successfully completed English 2268 with permission of the instructor by portfolio submission.


English 4569: Digital Media in English Studies: Digital Protest and Online Activism 
Instructor:
John Jones 
Critical examination of the intersections between specific areas or problems in English studies and the emergent technologies used to acquire and create knowledge in the discipline. 


English 4572: English Grammar and Usage 
Instructor:
Lauren Squires 
An examination of terminology and structures traditionally associated with the study of English grammar and usage rules, especially problematic ones, governing edited written American English. 


English 4573.02: Rhetoric and Social Action 
Instructor:
Staff 
Examination of persuasive strategies in social interaction, such as social movements, political protests, cultural trends, rituals and ceremonies and everyday practices. 


English 4575: Special Topics in Literary Forms and Themes 
Instructors:
Angus Fletcher 
In this course, you will learn to write like your favorite author, in any genre or any medium, from poetry to comics, film to fiction, essays to television, memoir to mashup, ancient or modern. You will start by learning the secret to uncovering your favorite author's creative blueprint, identifying the formal elements that your author uses like nobody else. Maybe the element is a unique style, or a special recipe for character, or an innovative use of plot, or storyworld, or voice or atmosphere. Then you'll incorporate that blueprint into your own writing. So you will create your own original piece of writing that sounds just like your favorite author—while also sounding just like you. 


English 4577.02: Folklore II—Genres, Form, Meaning and Use 
Instructors:
Merrill Kaplan

LEGEND has classically been defined as a genre of prose narrative, an objectively false story told by people who ignorantly believe it is true. Almost everything about this definition is wrong. This course explores legend, rumor, superstition and folk belief in places and times from 19th-century Scandinavia to the 21st-century Internet. We’ll get to know the structure and subject matter of legend, the relationship between legend, belief and personal experience, and the nature of legend as contested truth. We’ll learn about the history of the collection of legends and become acquainted with the work of major scholars. By the end of the course, students will understand some of the difficulties posed by attempts to define legend as a genre and have learned strategies for interpreting legend and rumor as meaningful expression. 


English 4578: Special Topics in Film—Disney(Plus) 
Instructors:
Jared Gardner 
This course will study the history of Disney from its founding in 1923 as a small animation studio in a Hollywood dominated by major studios to its emergence in the twenty-first century as the world's most profitable global media conglomerate. Along with analysis of film, television and other media texts, the course will engage heavily with film history (including studio and industry history), media history and popular culture studies from 1920s-2020, considering not only Disney's own theatrical output but also the wide range of media that the company has acquired and developed, including Pixar, the Star Wars franchise and of course the Marvel Cinematic Universe. The launching of the new Disney+ streaming platform will also provide us with an occasion to consider the state (and future) of transmedia storytelling and media circulation in the new age of the horizontally integrated "studio." 


English 4578: Special Topics in Film—Musicals 
Instructors:
David Brewer 
This course will investigate what is perhaps simultaneously the most beloved and the most mocked of all film genres: the musical.  We'll explore the enduring appeal of characters bursting into song and dance when their emotions swell.  And we'll consider why such an inherently ridiculous form should persist, despite all of the changes to both society and the film industry over the past century. Likely viewings will include 42nd Street, Singin' in the Rain, Oklahoma!, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, West Side Story, The Blues Brothers, The Little Mermaid, Chicago, Hedwig and the Angry Inch, Moulin Rouge!, Sweeney Todd, Mamma Mia! and La La Land. Course requirements include a weekly viewing journal, a few short written exercises, an ethnographic field trip to a midnight screening of The Rocky Horror Picture Show, active participation in our discussions and a final project whose form can be negotiated. 


English 4582: Special Topics in African American Literature 
Instructor:
Adélékè Adéẹ̀kọ́ 
Focuses on themes in African American Literature. Topic varies. Examples: Neo-slave narratives; the Harlem Renaissance; literature by African American women. 


English 4583: Special Topics in World Literature in English 
Instructor:
Adélékè Adéẹ̀kọ́ 
Study of literatures written in English and produced outside of the U.S. and Britain; topics include colonial/postcolonial writing, regional literature, theoretical and historical approaches genres. 


English 4590.07H: Literature in English after 1945 
Instructor:
Jessica Prinz 
This Honors Seminar will consider literature from 1945, and its relation to science. Although science fiction is a genre devoted to science and its fusion with literature, we will be looking at other genres as well, as we explore some of the central concerns of the period. 
Readings for the class will be taken from the following list: 
Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go;  Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49;  Z. Smith, White Teeth; Egan, A Visit from the Goon Squad; DeLillo, White Noise; Eggers, The Circle; Calvino, If on a Winter's Night a Traveler; Lightman, Einstein's Dreams; Benedict, The Other Einstein. No prior knowledge of contemporary science or literature is required. 


English 4592 (10): Special Topics in Women in Literature and Culture 
Instructor:
Sandra MacPherson 
Using feminist perspectives, students will learn to analyze literature and other cultural works (film, television, digital media) written by or about women. Time period and topic vary. 


English 4592 (20): Special Topics in Women in Literature and Culture 
Instructor:
Clare Simmons 
The British Census of 1851 revealed that there were at least half a million more women in Britain than there were men, leading to the conclusion that many women would never be wives.  If marriage could no longer be assumed to be the ultimate goal of women's lives, this raised the question of what women's roles in society should be.  Modern feminism owes much of its origins to debates over the so-called "Surplus Woman Question," so in this course we will read examples of nineteenth-century women's writing that challenge earlier notions of womanhood and that present a variety of answers as to  how women might find personal fulfillment.  Texts will include Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, Dinah Mulock Craik's The Half-Caste, Florence Nightingale's Cassandra, Christina Rossetti's "Goblin Market," Charlotte Mary Yonge's The Clever Woman of the Family and Louisa May Alcott's Work, plus relevant criticism and contextual readings.  Course requirements are careful reading in advance; regular attendance and participation; reading response questions; two essays; and a teaching-related presentation. 

Text

English 5191: Internship in English Studies—Promotional Media Internship 
Instructor:
Scott DeWitt 
This internship opportunity will offer students experience in creating timely, relevant and compelling short-form promotional media (primarily video and audio) for the Department of English. Students will work closely with their supervisor as well as with key communications personnel to develop projects and set priorities and deadlines. English 5191, Promotional Media Internship, will be intensely hands-on and focus almost exclusively on digital media production and related work-management skills in professional settings. This internship site requires students to work both independently and collaboratively. This internship opportunity is especially applicable to English majors who would like to develop their digital media skills in a workplace setting and for those who have digital media skills with nowhere to apply them.  
Students with digital media skills are encouraged to enroll.  However, media skills are NOT a prerequisite; students will learn all media skills necessary for the class. (This internship does not fulfill the digital media requirement for the Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy concentration in the English Major.)


English 5194: Group Studies—Death 
Instructor:
Hannibal Hamlin 

Humanity’s death rate remains steady at 100%. We all die. How we come to terms with death, or resist it, or deny it, varies among peoples and cultures. No surprise then that death has been so popular a topic throughout the history of the arts. Adam and Eve bring death into the world by eating the forbidden fruit. Gilgamesh mourns his beloved friend Enkidu. Priam and Troy mourn the death of Hector. David laments Saul and Jonathan. The pyramids, the Taj Mahal, the terra cotta army of Emperor Qin Shi Huang, the Treasury at Petra, and Ohio’s Serpent Mound are all tombs.

This course explores plays, poems, stories, novels and films about death. Aided by readings in sociology, philosophy and medical ethics, we will ask what death is, why and how we die, how we grieve, why we treat the dead as we do and why we imagine the dead returning to the living. Readings will include excerpts from Atul Gawande’s Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End, Thomas Lynch’s The Undertaking: Life Studies from the Dismal Trade and Mary Roach’s Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers. Literary works will include excerpts from the Bible and Gilgamesh, Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying, George Saunders’ Lincoln in the Bardo, Alejandro Amenábar’s The Others, David Lowery’s A Ghost Story, stories by M.R. James and Raymond Carver and poems by John Donne, Thomas Gray, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson and Tony Harrison.


English 5710.01/.02: Introduction to Old English Language and Literature — The Language of Beowulf 
Instructor:
Christopher Jones 
This course introduces students to Old English language—the form of early English in which Beowulf and many other works were composed. While learning to read actual Old English texts, we will also examine aspects of the cultural history of early medieval England. There will be a series of short quizzes and translations assignments, as well as a final project devised by the student in consultation with the instructor. No prior study of linguistics or the Middle Ages is required to enroll. 


English 5721.01/.02: Graduate Studies in Renaissance Drama—The Plays of Beaumont and Fletcher: Kings, Courts, Suspense and Pretty Tricks 
Instructor:
Alan Farmer
Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher were two of the most popular and innovative playwrights in Renaissance England. Their plays were regularly performed at court, were best-sellers in print and were eventually monumentalized in a 1647 folio collection. The plays they wrote by themselves, collaboratively with each other and collaboratively with other playwrights permanently changed the genres and forms of English drama. Beaumont's wildly allusive The Knight of the Burning Pestle challenged audiences to follow its ironical, metatheatrical plots, while their collaboratively written tragicomedies Philaster, A King and No King and The Island Princess astonished and confused audiences with their complex plots and surprise endings.  In this course, we will read several well-known and lesser-known plays by Beaumont and Fletcher, as we consider how these plays engage with such important early modern topics as courts and kings, gender and sexuality, London and colonialism, revenge and tragedy. 

Text

PREVIOUS COURSE OFFERINGS

Text

1000-level

 

English 1109: Intensive Writing and Reading 
Instructor:
Christiane Buuck 
Provides intensive practice in integrating academic reading and writing. 

English 1110.01: First-Year English Composition 
Instructor:
Staff 
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers.

*Traditional and online sections available 
GE: Writing and Communication — Level 1 

English 1110.02: First-Year English Composition 
Instructor:
Staff 
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers. Taught with an emphasis on literary texts.

GE: Writing and Communication — Level 1 

English 1110.02 (60): First-Year English Composition 
Instructor:
Matthew Cariello                                                                                                     Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers. Taught with an emphasis on literary texts.

GE: Writing and Communication — Level 1 

English 1110.02 (100): First-Year English Composition 
Instructor:
Francis Donoghue 
This is a first-year writing course with a focus on literature. After a brief time doing ethnographic exercises, we'll move through some of the major genres of literature - fiction, drama, poetry. We'll also spend time during every class doing grammar exercises and discussing critical writing. Four papers and a final exam.

GE: Writing and Communication — Level 1 

English 1110.02 (120): First-Year English Composition 
Instructor:
Matthew Cariello 
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers. Taught with an emphasis on literary texts.

GE: Writing and Communication — Level 1 

English 1110.03 (10, 30): First-Year English Composition 
Instructor:
Mira Kafantaris 
Intensive practice in fundamentals of expository writing illustrated in the student's own writing and essays of professional writers; offered in a small class setting and linked with an individual tutoring component in its concurrent course, ENGLISH-1193. This course is available for EM credit only through the AP program.

GE: Writing and Communication — Level 1 

English 1110.03 (20): First-Year English Composition 
Instructor:
Christiane Buuck 
Intensive practice in fundamentals of expository writing illustrated in the student's own writing and essays of professional writers; offered in a small class setting and linked with an individual tutoring component in its concurrent course, ENGLISH-1193. This course is available for EM credit only through the AP program.

GE: Writing and Communication — Level 1 

English 1193: Individual Studies 
Instructor:
Martha Sims         
Intensive practice in the fundamentals of expository writing. 


2000-level

 

English 2201H: Selected Works of British Literature — Honors Survey of British Literature, Beowulf to 1800
Instructor:
Leslie Lockett 
This course introduces students to some of the major British literary texts written from the early Middle Ages through the late eighteenth century, including Beowulf, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Marlowe's Doctor Faustus, Milton's Paradise Lost and Aphra Behn's Oroonoko. Our approach to the literature will emphasize close reading, form and genre and historical context. Students will develop their research skills by means of a researched essay or creative project. Other requirements include response papers and a final exam.

GE: Literature 
GE: Diversity (Global Studies) 

English 2202: Selected Works of British Literature — 1800 to Present 
Instructor:
Jill Galvan 
This course will introduce students to some of the major British texts, authors and literary forms and trends of the last two centuries. In the process, you will be learning about diverse perspectives on important cultural developments over the past two centuries, including the French Revolution, the abolition of slavery, the Industrial Revolution, imperialism, debates over gender roles and sexuality, the rise of scientific values, the twentieth-century world wars and the political and cultural consequences of decolonization. We will study major literary modes such as the Romantic lyric, the Gothic novel, the dramatic monologue, World War I poetry, postcolonial narrative and the Bildungsroman (or “coming-of-age novel”). Our fiction and drama will include Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol, Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest and Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go. English 2202 will also familiarize students with college-level strategies for analyzing literature. Main course requirements include two exams and two short papers designed to build your skills in literary interpretation.

GE: Literature 
GE: Diversity (Global Studies) 

English 2202H: Selected Works of British Literature: 1800 to Present 
Instructor:
Jacob Risinger 
A great grand tour of British Literature from the Napoleonic Wars to Brexit, with a special emphasis on the collision of history and literary form.

GE: Literature 
GE: Diversity (Global Studies) 

English 2220: Introduction to Shakespeare 
Instructor:
Christopher Highley 
Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience.

GE: Literature 
GE: Diversity (Global Studies) 

English 2220H: Introduction to Shakespeare 
Instructor:
Luke Wilson 
This course is designed for Honors students as an introduction to the dramatic work of Shakespeare through close study of a sampling of his plays. Our primary concern will be with Shakespeare’s text, but we will also spend some time discussing the conditions of theatrical performance as well as recent film adaptations. Of particular interest will be Shakespeare’s use of sources (he invented almost nothing out of whole cloth and yet managed somehow to be extraordinarily original), and his (kind of astonishing) ability to be at once deeply responsive to the historical moments in which he wrote and endlessly relevant to our own times and lives. Written assignments will encourage you to develop your knowledge of Shakespeare by way of different sets of skills: informal response; close textual and semantic analysis; engagement with secondary (scholarly) discussions of Shakespeare; group work on play performance; a review of a theatrical production; and the production of a substantial critical argument of your own. No prior knowledge of Shakespeare is required.

GE: Literature 
GE: Diversity (Global Studies) 

English 2260 (20): Introduction to Poetry                                                                         Instructor: Clare Simmons 
This course, which fulfills the General Education literature requirement, will provide an introduction to the types and forms of poetry in English, with a particular emphasis on the ways that poems represent the variety and diversity of human experience. Students will have the opportunity to read a wide selection of poems and to practice skills in close reading, analyzing, discussing and writing about literary works. The main texts will be a selection of classic poems available through Carmen; and The Penguin Anthology of Twentieth-Century American Poetry, edited by Rita Dove. Students will be responsible for regular attendance and participation in classroom discussion and group activities; a reading journal; two short papers; and mid-term and final exams.

GE: Literature 

English 2260 (30): Introduction to Poetry 
Instructor:
Leslie Lockett 
This course introduces students to strategies for understanding and enjoying poetry in English, from Old English elegies through Lin-Manuel Miranda's lyrics to the musical Hamilton. We will learn about the sounds of poetry in the ear and the shapes of poetry on the page; we will discuss social and political uses of poetry; and we will delve into the techniques by which poets imbue their words with multiple layers of meaning.

GE: Literature 

English 2260 (30): Introduction to Poetry — Ohio Poets 
Instructor:
Molly Farrell 
This course explores the flourishing of poetry by writers with a deep connection to Ohio. From James Wright and Paul Lawrence Dunbar to Rita Dove and Hanif Abdurraqib, we will investigate the cultural corners of the state through the work of its acclaimed poets. How do these poems teach us to understand, enjoy, and appreciate poetry? And how does a better understanding of poetry help us to see this particular place in new ways? Beginning in the nineteenth century up to the present day, we will explore various trends in poetic form and gain a sophisticated understanding of poetic terms. Connections to Ohio will work as a lens with which to view larger developments in American poetry, while at the same time we will investigate the ways the state's particular geography and history foster literary experimentation and engagement.  Course requirements include readings, written responses, two exams and a final project. This course fulfills the GE requirement in literature.

GE: Literature 

English 2260H: Introduction to Poetry 
Instructor:
Jill Galvan 
Designed to help students understand and appreciate poetry through an intensive study of a representative group of poems.

GE: Literature 

English 2261 (10): Introduction to Fiction 
Instructors:
Matthew Cariello 
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.

GE: Literature

English 2261 (20): Introduction to Fiction 
Instructors:
Antony Shuttleworth 
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.

GE: Literature 

English 2261 (30): Introduction to Fiction                                                                               Instructors: Matthew Cariello 
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.

GE: Literature 

English 2261 (40): Introduction to Fiction                                                                               Instructors: Staff 
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.

GE: Literature 

English 2261 (70): Introduction to Fiction — Game of Thrones 
Instructors:
Elizabeth Renker 
This class celebrates the conclusion to a beloved HBO series. Even the most dedicated fans might not realize that "Game of Thrones" is also a skilled and complex work of literature tied to a long history of literary concepts and approaches. This class will train you in core analytical methods that will enable newcomers to the series as well as longstanding fans to understand "Game of Thrones" at a deeper level of richness and pleasure. You will also learn the core skills of literary interpretation without a lot of heavy reading assignments. We will focus only on the first two seasons of the HBO series, although all students are required to watch the entire series before our class begins. (We will not read or discuss the books by George R.R. Martin.) Requirements: I have designed this class to address student concerns about GE classes more generally. There will be few written assignments to be handed in; instead, the grade will be based on daily attendance; preparation of daily homework questions; short, quick daily quizzes about the homework; high-participation activities in class; and four short (250 word) written assignments over the course of the semester (from which students can choose among multiple deadlines best for their schedules. Textbooks: an HBO subscription; readings posted on Carmen.

GE: Literature 

English 2261 (80): Introduction to Fiction                                                                               Instructors: Zoe Brigley Thompson 
This introduction to fiction course will focus on authors from the United States who have a variety of backgrounds. That is, not every author studied will be white.

GE: Literature 

English 2261 (90): Introduction to Fiction — Thematic Approaches to Literature, Slavery and the Novel 1660-1808 
Instructors:
Roxann Wheeler 
During this time period, concepts of slavery shifted from featuring European-born slaves in the Mediterranean to featuring African-born slaves in the Caribbean and Europe.  The course investigates the racial, gender and class dynamics of the storylines of literature during the height of slavery and abolition.

GE: Literature 

English 2261 (100): Introduction to Fiction
Instructors:
Jessica Prinz
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations; comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.

GE: Literature

English 2263: Introduction to Film
Instructor:
Sean O'Sullivan
This course offers an introduction to the language and aesthetics of cinema. In the first part of the course, we will study the basic elements of film grammar, from shot construction to editing to mise-en-scene to sound. In the second part, we will examine how that grammar is used to create different kinds of narratives, including documentaries, and how certain values of storytelling style have been privileged over others. We will use each week?s film as both a case study in the strategic deployment of certain cinematic techniques, and as a specific set of images and sounds that combine to create a unique cinematic expression. Throughout the semester, we will focus on detailed analysis of films, analyzing closely the ways in which the multiple elements of moviemaking come together to make meanings.

GE: VPA 

English 2264: Introduction to Popular Culture Studies
Instructor:
Staff 
Introduction to the analysis of popular culture texts.

GE: Cultures & Ideas. 
*This is a combined section class. Cross-listed in CompStd. 

English 2265 (10): Introductory Fiction Writing                                                                       Instructor: Sheldon Costa 
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre. 

English 2265 (30): Introductory Fiction Writing 
Instructor:
Margaret Sarsfield 
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre. 

English 2265 (40): Introductory Fiction Writing 
Instructor:
Krishna Mishra 
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre. 

English 2265 (50): Introductory Fiction Writing 
Instructors:
Kirsten Edwards 
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre. 

English 2266 (10): Introductory Poetry Writing 
Instructors:
Molly Ortiz 
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, composition and prosody; practice in the writing of poetry; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published poems by established poets. Prereq: 1110. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credit hrs. 

English 2266 (20): Introductory Poetry Writing 
Instructors:
Robert Schumaker
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, composition and prosody; practice in the writing of poetry; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published poems by established poets. Prereq: 1110. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credit hrs. 

English 2267: Introduction to Creative Writing                                                                       Instructor: Margaret Brown 
An introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction. Analysis and discussion of student work, with reference to the general methods and scope of all three genres. 

English 2268 (10): Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing 
Instructor:
Mia Santiago 
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of creative nonfiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published essays by masters of the many forms of creative nonfiction. 

English 2269: Digital Media Composing 
Instructor:
Staff 
A composition course in which students analyze and compose digital media texts while studying complex forms and practices of textual production.

GE: VPA 

English 2270: Introduction to Folklore 
Instructor:
Staff 
Folklore theory and methods explored through engagement with primary sources: folktale, legend, jokes, folksong, festival, belief, art. Folklore Minor course.

GE: Cultures & Ideas 
*This is a combined section class 

English 2276: Arts of Persuasion
Instructor:
James Fredal 
Introduces students to the study and practice of rhetoric and how arguments are shaped by technology, media and cultural contexts.

GE: Cultures & Ideas 

English 2277: Introduction to Disability Studies 
Instructor:
Staff 
Foundational concepts and issues in disability studies; introduction to the sociopolitical models of disability.

GE: Cultures & Ideas 

English 2281: Introduction to African-American Literature 
Instructor:
Andrea Williams 
This course explores the richness of African American literary traditions from the 1700s to the present. The class offers a chronological survey of representative African American texts, while considering the context of how each work is written, published, and received by readers. By comparing the readings over the course of the semester, we will be able to trace the themes and styles that African American texts often share, as well as the ways writers expand or revise these patterns to create innovative autobiographies, coming-of-age stories, plays, science fiction and drama.

GE: Literature 
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.) 
*This is a combined lecture class. Cross-listed in AfAmASt 

English 2290: Colonial and U.S. Literature to 1865 
Instructor:
Elizabeth Hewitt 
In this course, we will consider the relationship between literature and nationalism: how is literature used to establish national identity? What happens when the laws and practices of the nation contradict the stories told about it? What happens to national stories when citizens disagree? Can people who are not afforded citizenship help write national myths? We will approach these and other questions by reading work from before the United States was a nation until its division during the Civil War. We will explore how essayists, politicians, novelists, and poets addressed a broad array of historical, cultural, and literary concerns, including settlement, revolution, slavery, diversity, religion, equality and others. 

English 2367.01: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience 
Instructor:
Staff 
Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America.

GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two) 
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.) 

English 2367.01 (120): Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience 
Instructor:
Eddie Singleton 
Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America.

GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two) 
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.) 

English 2367.02 (100): Literature in the U.S. Experience 
Instructor:
Staff 
Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.

GE: Literature 
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two) 
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.) 

English 2367.03: Documentary in the U.S. Experience 
Instructor:
Staff 
An intermediate course that extends and refines skills in critical reading and expository writing through analysis of written texts, video and documentaries.

GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two) 

English 2367.06: Composing Disability in the US 
Instructor:
Staff 
Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America. 

English 2367.07S: Literacy Narratives of Black Columbus 
Instructor:
Staff 
This service-learning course focuses on collecting and preserving literacy narratives of Columbus-area Black communities. Through engagement with community partners, students refine skills in research, analysis and composition; students synthesize information, create arguments about discursive/visual/cultural artifacts and reflect on the literacy and life-history narratives of Black Columbus. 

English 2367.08: The US Experience: Writing About Video Games 
Instructor:
Staff 
In this course, we will play and think critically about video games through the lens of race and gender. We will consider issues of representation in games and also in films about/that include video game aesthetics. No gaming experience necessary! 

English 2463: Introduction to Video Games Analysis 
Instructor:
Staff 
An introduction to humanities-based methods of analyzing and interpreting video games in terms of form, genre, style and theory. No background in video game play is necessary. All students will have regular opportunities for hands-on experience with different game types and genres in both the computer-based classroom and the Department of English Video Game Lab.

GE: VPA 

English 2464: Introduction to Comic Studies 
Instructor:
Jared Gardner 
This class introduces students to the history, forms, and study of graphic storytelling.  We will approach comics as a medium  which expresses stories and ideas across a wide range of genres using a blend of text and images.  Beginning by learning the grammar of comics and the terminology for how comics texts achieve their effects, we will study the ways comics are made and the ways they are received readers and fans. The range of texts will include newspaper comic strips, comic books, graphic novels and memoirs, manga, web comics and experimental comics. Requirements will include one in-class group presentation, short blog assignments (including at least one involving research at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum), a final paper and lots of lively discussion.

GE: VPA 


3000-level

 

English 3271 (10 and 30): Structure of the English Language 
Instructor:
Clarissa Surek-Clark 
Students learn basic characteristics of English linguistics focusing on the basic building blocks of language; the sounds of English and how they are put together, word formation processes and rules for combining words into utterances/sentences. Students investigate and explore linguistic variation, accents of American English and the implications of language evolution in educational settings.

GE: Cultures & Ideas 

English 3271 (20): Structure of the English Language 
Instructor:
Lauren Squires 
Students learn basic characteristics of English linguistics focusing on the basic building blocks of language; the sounds of English and how they are put together, word formation processes and rules for combining words into utterances/sentences. Students investigate and explore linguistic variation, accents of American English and the implications of language evaluation in educational settings.

GE: Cultures & Ideas 

English 3304: Business and Professional Writing 
Instructor:
Christiane Buuck 
The study of principles and practices of business and professional writing. 

English 3305 (10): Technical Writing 
Instructor:
Jason Collins 
Study of principles and practices of technical writing. Emphasis on the style, organization and conventions of technical and research reports, proposals, memoranda, professional correspondence, etc. 

English 3305 (20): Technical Writing 
Instructor:
Staff 
Study of principles and practices of technical writing. Emphasis on the style, organization and conventions of technical and research reports, proposals, memoranda, professional correspondence, etc. 

English 3361: Narrative and Medicine 
Instructor:
Antonio Ferraro 
Illness generates stories. Whether from patients, caregivers or loved one, stories of illness are everywhere, informing our sense of what it means to suffer, to adjust to altered and disabled bodies and to seek comfort and relief. In this class we'll explore, through close examinations of novels, essays, films, poems and other media, the many ways illness narratives intervene in our shared and individual conceptions of illness. Further, by drawing on our different personal and academic experiences, we'll explore how improving our narrative competencies, or the different ways we respond to and create narratives, can inform our medical competencies, or the ways we give and receive health care.

GE: Literature 

English 3364 (10): Special Topics in Popular Culture — Vampires 
Instructor:
Karen Winstead 
This course will examine the representation of vampires in popular culture, from their folkloric roots and their classic literary representations in the nineteenth-century- John Polidori's Vampyre, Sheridan Le Fanu's Carmilla and Bram Stoker's Dracula - to their recent incarnations in TV, film and in such novels as Let the Right One In and NOS4A2.  We will consider what made blood-suckers so mesmerizing and how their image has shifted over the centuries.  We will also consider how these figures have been used to explore a host of social issues, generational and class conflict, changing gender roles, sexual identity - as well as to articulate "forbidden" passions and fears.  Requirements will include a series of Carmen quizzes, three short essays and a final exam.

GE: Cultures & Ideas 

English 3372 (20): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy 
Instructor:
Staff 
Introduction to the tradition and practice of speculative writing. Provides students the opportunity to examine and compare works of science fiction and/or fantasy.

GE: Literature  

English 3372 (30): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy — Tolkien's Monsters 
Instructor:
Merrill Kaplan 
Tolkien`s bestiary of wights, wargs, balrogs and nazguls is half the fun of his books. Add the races of elves, dwarves, hobbits, orcs and men and there is a lot to talk about. What is a monster and what do monsters mean? What are the relationships between Tolkien`s monsters and the elves, dragons and trolls of folklore and medieval epic? How have Tolkien`s ideas about race affected subsequent fantasy literature and games? In looking at monsters, we`ll examine the boundaries of the human and explore the violent language of dehumanization. We`ll hew to the books, not the movies and readings will include the Hobbit, the Lord of the Rings trilogy, Tolkien`s essay "The Monsters and the Critics," modern theoretical works on monstrosity and about race, and comparative texts from folklore and medieval literature.

GE: Literature 

English 3372 (10 and 40): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy — How Magic Works 
Instructor:
David Brewer 
The most fundamental distinguishing mark of fantasy is that it features stories in which magic works. The magic may be front and center (Harry Potter) or kept largely in the background (Game of Thrones); it may be largely an instrument of evil or a morally neutral tool. But regardless of the form it takes, in the vast majority of fantasy, magic is real, which means that to the extent that we buy into these stories and the worlds in which they're set, we are temporarily accepting the existence of magic (or at least suspending our disbelief in its existence). This course will investigate how that process works, and what it might be able to tell us about literature more generally. We'll also consider how the open embrace of magic has contributed to the (traditionally low, but recently rising) cultural status of fantasy. Course requirements include a weekly reading and viewing journal, a recommendation to your colleagues of a work of fantasy beyond what we will be reading together, a short essay, active participation in our discussions and a contribution to a collectively devised new magic system.

GE: Literature 

English 3378: Special Topics in Film and Literature — Shakespeare and Film 
Instructor:
Alan Farmer 
In this course, we will study some of the most innovative and influential films ever made of Shakespeare's plays.  We will both read specific plays (probably Richard III, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Much Ado About Nothing, Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Titus Andronicus and Macbeth) and view films that cut across dramatic genres, time periods, countries and cinematic styles, by such directors as Max Reinhardt (Austria and Germany), Laurence Olivier (England), Akira Kurosawa (Japan), Baz Luhrmann (Australia), Michael Almereyda (U.S.), Al Pacino (U.S.) and Julie Taymor (U.S.). We will focus on how directors and actors have chosen to adapt Shakespeare for performance, but also consider how these films have shaped, and continue to shape, the cultural meaning of "Shakespeare: for modern audiences.  Requirements will include two essays, several quizzes, a midterm, a final exam, regular attendance and active participation.

GE: Cultures & Ideas 

English 3379 (10): Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy 
Instructor:
James Fredal 
Introduction to the interrelated fields of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy, familiarizing students with key concepts that underlie work in these interrelated fields and to the scholarly methods of WRL. Together, this discipline studies the ways people use language and other symbols to convey messages, persuade audiences, and create meaning and how these practices are learned and taught.  

English 3379 (20): Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy 
Instructor:
Christa Teston 
Introduction to the interrelated fields of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy, familiarizing students with key concepts that underlie work in these interrelated fields and to the scholarly methods of WRL. Together, this discipline studies the ways people use language and other symbols to convey messages, persuade audiences, and create meaning and how these practices are learned and taught.  

English 3398 (20): Methods for the Study of Literature 
Instructor:
Susan Williams 
Serves as the "Methods" course for the Literature and Creative Writing concentrations within the English major. Its purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing. Required of English majors. Open to English majors only or others by department permission. 

English 3398 (30): Methods for the Study of Literature — The Text, The Critic, & the World
Instructor:
Thomas Davis 
This course offers a foundation for those seeking to develop the skills and practices to succeed in the English major. We will think carefully about how our understanding and analysis of texts relates to the world as well as the practical ends of the kinds of work we do; to that end, we will experiment with different methods and different forms of writing (close reading exercises, listicles, public-facing criticism, expository essays and reseached essays). Students will engage with a wide range of genres, forms, and media, including poetry, climate fiction, visual media and possibly zines and a video game. We will also consider the value—economic, intellectual, cultural—of undertaking humanistic work in our contemporary moment of devalued labor, climate breakdown and “post-truth” politics.   

English 3398 (60): Methods for the Study of Literature 
Instructor:
Sarah Neville 
This class is designed to support students in developing the writing and research skills they need to be successful English majors. Classes and short assignments will cover issues like:

  • What does secondary criticism add to literature?
  • How do I read actively? What kinds of tools do I need?
  • How do I stake a claim? Do I need a flag?
  • What’s the difference between a long paper and a short one?
  • How can I distinguish between what they say about a text and what I say?

In addition, over the course of the term students will learn the types, tools, and methods of literary criticism that English scholars employ as they construct projects in both print and digital media. Along the way we’ll read a novel by Robertson Davies, short stories by Dorothy Parker, Lorrie Moore, Donald Barthelme, and George Saunders, plays by Djanet Sears and William Shakespeare, and poems by Billy-Ray Belcourt. Students will complete in-class exercises and multiple short writing assignments that ultimately build towards a longer research paper.

English 3465 (10): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing — Writing Against Convention
Instructor:
Scott Broker 
In this intermediate fiction course, we will focus on reading and writing work that challenges traditional modes of narrative realism. From genre blending to structural innovation, unconventional subject matter to non-standard logic, we will pursue and embrace that which is often seen as strange, taboo, uncanny, or queer, trying to understand how these stories work in relation to the normative conventions of fiction. We will begin by analyzing a wide range of texts to situate ourselves within the history of unconventional writing. From these stories, we will pull tricks and tools that will help in the development of our own unique voices. The reading list is diverse and challenging, and I ask and expect you to read with an open mind. Some possible authors include: Diane Cook, Mariana Enriquez, Samanta Schweblin, Deb Olin Unferth, Miranda July, Ben Marcus, Jamaica Kincaid, Lesley Nneka Arimah, Carmen Maria Machado, Kelly Link, Karen Russell, Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah, Joy Williams, Ottessa Moshfegh, Helen Oyeyemi, Catherine Lacey, Yukiko Motoya, Rita Bullwinkel and Aimee Bender.

English 3465 (30): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing — Flash and Other Short Forms of Fiction
Instructor:
Meagan McAlister 
This intermediate fiction class will explore flash fiction (generally considered to be fiction 250-1000 words in length) as well as other forms of short fiction. There is much discussion about what exactly flash is and what parameters define it—whether it be length, the presence of narrative vs lyrical language, experimental form, emotional density of content, etc. We’ll read and write widely to interrogate what flash fiction is and how we’ll go about writing it

Though this class is specifically focused on flash fiction, we will discuss and dabble in other short forms as well – sudden fiction (2000 words), prose poetry, smoke-long stories, palm-of-the-hand stories, micro fiction, nanofiction, hint fiction (25 words), 6-word stories, flash nonfiction, stories told in series and more. We’ll investigate the boundaries of genre—fiction, nonfiction and poetry—in these compressed forms, which makes this a great class for writers of all genres who are looking to experiment with what can be done in a small space.

English 3466: Special Topics in Intermediate Poetry Writing 
Instructor:
Margaret Colvett 
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing poetry. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored. 

English 3468: Special Topics in Intermediate Creative Nonfiction Writing 
Instructor:
David Grandouiller 
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing creative nonfiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored. 

English 3662 (10): An Introduction to Literary Publishing 
Instructor:
Kaiya Gordon 
An introduction to the theory and practice of editing and publishing literature. 

English 3662 (20): An Introduction to Literary Publishing 
Instructor:
Daniel Barnum-Swett 
An introduction to the theory and practice of editing and publishing literature. 


4000-level

 

English 4150: Cultures of Professional Writing 
Instructor:
Jennifer Patton 
Examine writing in various workplaces. Analyze writing discourse that shapes professional organizations. Explore ongoing technological and cultural shifts required of workplace writers and the role of digital media.                       

English 4189 (10): Professional Writing Minor—Capstone Internship 
Instructor:
Jennifer Patton 
Students work onsite in an organization doing writing-related work and meet weekly to discuss related topics.                                                                  

English 4189 (20): Professional Writing Minor—Capstone Internship 
Instructor:
Lindsay Martin 
Students work onsite in an organization doing writing-related work and meet weekly to discuss related topics.                                                                  

English 4321: Environmental Literature, Cultures and Media
Instructor:
Thomas Davis 
In Fall of 2016 the Working Group on the Anthropocene declared that there is sufficient evidence to demonstrate that humans have exited the Holocene, the geological epoch of the last 11,700 years that was characterized by climatic stability and incredibly swift human development. The Anthropocene declares that human activity has forced the Earth system for the first time beyond natural variability. Energy extraction, large scale agriculture, atomic testing, urban growth, deforestation, and mass consumption among other factors have altered the cryosphere, the biosphere, and the atmosphere. The rapid rate of biodiversity loss has led many to claim we are living in the midst of the Sixth Extinction. What will constitute a livable future on such a changing planet? What cultural resources do we have to begin imagining other ways of relating to humans and to nonhuman nature? What cultural resources do we need to create?
We will read widely in contemporary literature, Environmental and Energy Humanities scholarship, view documentaries and visual art, and collaborate with the Museum of Biological Diversity. Students will engage in image curation, collectively develop a Lexicon for the Anthropocene, and pursue other projects. Authors may include Jeff VanDerMeer, Octavia Butler, Anna Tsing, Eileen Crist, Ross Gay, Layli Long Soldier, Elizabeth Kolbert and Naomi Klein, as well as writings from Extinction Rebellion and the Degrowth Movement.                                                                                                      

English 4400: Literary Locations—Venice
Instructor:
Alan Farmer 
This Literary Locations program offers students the opportunity to study the history and representation of Venice in English and European literature from the sixteenth to the twentieth century, and to spend almost two weeks (May 1-13, 2020) exploring the historical and cultural sites of Venice and Padua. A city of labyrinthine canals and alleys, known for its vast wealth and its mix of Eastern and Western art and architecture, but also for its courtesans, con men, casinos and Carnival, Venice has for centuries inspired tales of cultural conflict, sexual intrigue, magic and mystery, decay and death. We will see the Basilica of St. Mark near which the main character in Ben Jonson's Volpone impersonates a mountebank, the Ghetto where Shakespeare's Shylock lives and prays in The Merchant of Venice and the canals and palazzi that both fascinated and disturbed writers like John Ruskin and Henry James. We will visit the prison that held Casanova in the Doge's Palace, the beaches where Thomas Mann's Aschenbach roams in Death in Venice and the insane asylum on San Servolo where Jeanette Winterson's The Passion ends. The city's impressive churches and museums will offer students the chance to see masterpieces by the Venetian artists Tintoretto, Titian, Carpaccio, Giorgione, Veronese, Gentile Bellini and Giovanni Bellini. The course will also include a visit to Padua, home to one of the oldest universities in Europe and to a dazzling series of frescoes by Giotto in the Scrovegni Chapel. Cost of program: TBA. Application Deadline: November 15, 2019. Application information available from the OIA website.

English 4513: Introduction to Medieval Literature 
Instructor:
Christopher Jones 
English 4513 guides students through representative works of literature produced across Europe during the Middle Ages (roughly 500-1500 A.D.). The course approaches medieval writings both as objects of study in their own right and as important backgrounds for understanding subsequent developments in European and American literature. The syllabus is not limited to any particular genre or theme but will visit major works of many different kinds, including early Christian epic (Prudentius's Psychomachia) and philosophy (Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy), mythography (Snorri's prose Edda), heroic sagas (tales of the Irish warrior CuChulainn and the Germanic champion Sigurd/Siegfried) and Arthurian legends (the romances of Chretien de Troyes), as well as works illustrating the emergence of allegory and (auto)biography as important modes of expression. The culmination of the class will be a reading of selections from the medieval work that subsumes many genres and trends of the period as a whole, namely Dante's Divine Comedy. Requirements include reading-comprehension quizzes or informal writing assignments, one short essay, one longer research paper and a cumulative final exam. Regular attendance and participation are also required. This class satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English Major.

English 4520.01 (10): Shakespeare 
Instructor:
Hannibal Hamlin 
As Robert Bridges wrote, "The remarkable thing about Shakespeare is that he is really very good -- in spite of all the people who say he is very good." Shakespeare was one of the greatest playwrights who has ever lived and one of the greatest creative artists. As an artist, Shakespeare's medium was language - words, sentences, metaphors, puns and allusions. The Oxford English Dictionary credits Shakespeare with introducing more words into the English language than any other person ever, including "dwindle," "bedroom," "bloodstained," "anchovy," "skim milk" and "foul-mouthed." He also invented dozens of phrases we now use every day, like "full circle," "foregone conclusion," "wild-goose chase" and "with bated breath." This course will explore Shakespeare's plays from many different perspectives, but we will pay particular attention to their language, beginning with a cluster of particularly rich poetic plays written in the mid-1590s and then turning to several of the greatest Jacobean tragedies. Plays will include A Midsummer Night's Dream, Romeo and Juliet, Richard II, Othello, King Lear and Macbeth. We'll also read some contextual material and critical essays which will be available via Carmen. Assignments will include two critical papers, a midterm test and a final exam. 

English 4520.01 (20): Shakespeare 
Instructor:
Luke Wilson 
This course is designed as an introduction to some of the more important critical problems and issues in Shakespeare studies through close study of plays in each of the dramatic genres in which Shakespeare wrote.  Our primary concern will be with Shakespeare's text, but we will also spend some time discussing theatrical performances as well as film adaptations.  Written assignments will encourage you to develop your knowledge of Shakespeare by way of different sets of skills: informal response; close textual and semantic analysis; engagement with secondary (scholarly) discussions of Shakespeare; group work on play performance; a review of a theatrical production; and the production of substantial critical argument of your own.

English 4520.02: Special Topics in Shakespeare — Shakespeare's Sense of Humor 
Instructor:
Sarah Neville 
This upper level special topics course examines humor in the plays of Shakespeare by considering not only the genre of comedy, but also humorous moments in his histories and tragedies. We will investigate questions like:

  • How did Shakespeare create moments that are funny?
  • Why did Shakespeare’s jokes sometimes use racist or sexist tropes?
  • What sorts of linguistic play is at work in a pun?
  • How does stage action reinforce or undermine dialogue?
  • When does humor mask aggression?
  • How can speeches signal slapstick or physical effect?
  • Why is farce considered a lower form of drama than romance?
  • What is the effect of putting a child or dog onstage?

Writing assignments will include a research paper, a theatre review and short reflections.

English 4533: The Early British Novel — Origins to 1830 
Instructor:
Sandra MacPherson 
Shipwreck! Attempted rape — of women and men! Murder! Demonic Possession! Impotence! If you think contemporary life is weird and twisty, wait until you meet the past. Want to know how we ended up in a world with Twilight and Fifty Shades of Grey? Then this is the course for you! Students will be introduced to early experiments in prose narrative that made possible their favorite thriller, romance, comedy or adventure tale. Without Samuel Richardson, there would be no Jane Austen or Ian McEwan—without Pamela (1739), no Sense and Sensibility, or Atonement. Without Henry Fielding, there would be no Charles Dickens or Mark Twain—without Joseph Andrews (1742), no Great Expectations, or Huckleberry Finn. Without Daniel Defoe, no Robert Louis Stevenson or Cormac McCarthy: no Robinson Crusoe (1719), no Treasure Island or The Road. Without the gothic fictions of Horace Walpole and Matthew Lewis and Anne Radcliffe, no Edgar Allen Poe, no Stephen King, no Nightmare on Elm Street. You get the picture. In order to bring into view the black hole that is fiction before Austen, we will move chronologically from the late seventeenth to the early nineteenth century, reading, in addition to Robinson Crusoe, Pamela, and Joseph Andrews, we will read Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko (1688), Eliza Haywood’s Fantomina (1725), Laurence Sterne’s Sentimental Journey (1768), Matthew Lewis’s The Monk (1796), The Woman of Colour (1808) by Anonymous, and occasional secondary sources on the history and theory of the novel. We will conclude with an example of a contemporary novel indebted to this history, Jennifer Egan’s The Keep (2006). The course will satisfy the pre-1800 requirement. And, among other things, might help to explain where blogging comes from.

English 4552: Special Topics in American Poetry Through 1915 — Reconstruction and the Gilded Age in America 
Instructor:
Elizabeth Renker 
The occasion for our class is the current 150-year commemorations of the post-Civil War periods often called "Reconstruction" and "The Gilded Age." Activism by and on behalf of the civil rights of millions of newly freed slaves provoked massive and routine terrorist violence against them in the former rebel states.  Settlers pushed into "the West," and indigenous peoples lost their lands and their lives.  The rise of big business and robber barons, conflict between labor and capital, wealth inequality and massive economic shifts arising from large-scale industrialization, immigration and other massive social changes upended daily life. Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner's 1873 novel of social critique, The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today, sarcastically gave this period its name. Our class will explore these complex social conflicts by reading short selections from the public conversations of the time; scholarly essays about our key historical topics; and literary works addressing these social changes.  Most of our literary texts will be short poems, an extremely popular genre at the time and one that addressed all the crucial issues of the day. (Focusing on short poems also helps us  to cover complex material while restricting reading to a number of pages manageable for students.) Authors will include Frances E.W. Harper, Sarah Piatt, Walt Whitman, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Bret Harte, E. Pauline Johnson, William Dean Howells, Emma Lazarus and anonymous and lesser-known poets. Textbooks: a paperback edition of the poems of Sarah Piatt; primary texts available through Ohio State library databases. Requirements: daily attendance, daily quizzes, daily participation in discussion; two brief (3-page) primary-source research assignments; and a menu of options for graded assignments from which students may choose, including a midterm and final exam; a midterm and final 7-page paper; or a single 15-page sustained research paper based in primary sources, an option especially useful for students working toward a writing sample for graduate school. 

English 4553: Twentieth-Century U.S. Fiction 
Instructor:
Francis Donoghue 
This will be a very unconventional approach to this very popular course in the English department's curriculum. We will first read each of the main texts - Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth, F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, Walter Tevis' The Hustler and Patricia Highsmith's The Talented Mr. Ripley, conventionally: analyzing the novels' plots, characters, central themes - just as you would expect from any upper level English course. However, once we've covered each novel we will then consider it as if it were a case study in a graduate level business course. That is, we will ask: "Did major characters make optimal decisions, and if they didn't, what else might they have done?" We will, in other words, first talk about the novels in a way typical of English studies, and then talk about them in a way that engages the analytical tools and rhetoric of a very different academic discipline. We may inhabit independent departments, but we need to remind ourselves that we are also part of the same university. Requirements: there will be one short paper, a final paper and a comprehensive final exam. Instead of a midterm, there will be intensive small group work and in-class presentations. 

English 4554: English Studies and Global Human Rights 
Instructor:
Sona Hill 
Covers key human rights concepts and the role that humanities-based methods of analysis can play in the study of human rights. Examines how human rights are described in legal texts, cultural narratives, public discourses and artistic representations. Also considers conflicting and contested representations, how they work and how they are used in particular contexts.  
Prereq: 2367.

GE: Diversity global studies. 

English 4565: Advanced Fiction Writing 
Instructor:
Lee Martin 
This is a creative writing workshop that focuses on short literary fiction. Each student will present two pieces or original fiction for workshop discussion and significantly revise one of those pieces to submit at the end of the semester. There may be additional readings and/or writing exercises, but the bulk of our work will involve the discussion of our own fiction.

English 4566: Advanced Poetry Writing 
Instructor:
Kathy Grandinetti 
Advanced workshop in the writing of poetry. This is a class for serious students of creative writing. Admission is by portfolio submission to the instructor.  

English 4568: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing 
Instructor:
Elissa Washuta 
Advanced workshop in the writing of creative nonfiction. This is a class for serious students of creative writing. Admission is by portfolio submission to the instructor. 

English 4569: Digital Media and English Studies—Digital Protest and Online Activism 
Instructor:
Christa Teston 
Because of their networked nature and participatory potential, digital media can be powerful actors in affecting social change. We tag, tweet, retweet, reblog, reshare, swipe left, swipe right, add filters, link, like, follow, friend and more. Connections are made. Alliances are forged. Technology, power and values are wonderfully and frightfully connected. In this class, we will investigate and experiment with digital media's affordances and constraints - particularly for the ways they do or do not engender social concern, garner attention, mobilize human and monetary resources and spark social justice. This course, then, is critical and creative. We will both think about and tinker with digital media. Class discussions will provide a rich and safe environment for you to explore and experiment with the consequences of humans' relationships with digital media, while studio days will afford hands-on guidance in leveraging digital media for the purpose of protest and activism. I also anticipate that events in the world will go on happening as they did before this class ever existed. So while the course has overarching learning objectives, how those objectives are achieved may be modified in response to uprisings, disasters, attacks and other events of social consequence yet to occur. 

English 4572: English Grammar and Usage 
Instructor:
Daniel Seward 
An examination of terminology and structures traditionally associated with the study of English grammar and usage rules, especially problematic ones, governing edited written American English. 

English 4578 (20): Special Topics in Film—From Exploitation Films to the Exploit
Instructor:
Jian Chen 
This course explores the cheap, low-culture sensation of exploitation films. As a class of films that became visible the 1920s in the U.S., exploitation films featured all that was considered excessive and prohibited under the Hollywood Hayes Production Code, including interracial relationships, sex, violence, nonheterosexual sexualities, single parent families, criminality, gore, the superhuman, and the supernatural. By the 1960s and 1970s, exploitation films became defined through specific genres targeting niche audiences, such as Blaxploitation, horror, sexploitation, martial arts, spaghetti westerns, gangster and prison films. Hollywood’s incorporation of exploitation’s smaller scale, niche production and iconography and the growing international cinematic market contributed to this shift. Beginning in the last decade of the twentietch century, electronic networks and global Hollywood have helped to further absorb, disperse, and reassemble exploitation films for hybrid transnational circulation. This course will track the development of the exploitation phenomenon alongside and within classical Hollywood cinema and then as a general feature of global postindustrial Hollywood and media. Course requirements may include an in-class presentation; midterm; and final project. Course materials may include films by Jack Hill, Ji-woon Kim, Robert Rodriguez, Jordan Peele, and Doris Wishman and critical discussions by Ed Guerrero, Carol Clover, Eric Schaefer and José Capino.

English 4578 (30): Special Topics in Film—Television, Narrative, Seriality
Instructor:
Sean O'Sullivan 
This course will consider central questions of televisual art and narrative, focusing on the first seasons of three twentty-first-century series: The Wire, Mad Men and Orange Is the New Black.  What are the basic narrative practices and structures of television—and serial television in particular?  How are storyworlds created?  What are the strategies and effects of devices such as the episode and the season?  How does character operate within television narrative?  How does televisual storytelling organize space and time?  What are the consequences of genre conventions and audience responses?  A recurring subject for the class will be the tension between the episodic and the serial—between individual aesthetic experiences and sprawling fictional universes.  Throughout, we will examine the vital intersections of an array of fields and practices: film studies, narratology, literature, media studies, visual culture and the segmented organization of experience.  

English 4580: Special Topics in LGBTQ Literatures and Cultures 
Instructor:
Martin Ponce 
This course examines twentieth and twenty-first-century U.S. literary texts and films that explore "queer" pasts and futures. Which historical figures have LGBTQ writers and filmmakers - particularly, artists of color - invoked, invented and reimagined? Whom have they claimed as their predecessors, ancestors or antagonists? What historical moments and cultural contexts have they perceived as worthy of investigation and representation? Alternatively, what kinds of "queer" worlds, environments and inhabitants have writers and filmmakers postulated in utopian and dystopian futures? 

English 4583: Special Topics in World Literature in English 
Instructor:
Adeleke Adeeko 
This discussion and lecture class will study selected Anglophone fiction, poetry, film, music and video produced by artists who came onto their own as culture leaders in the 21st century and among whom a small, forceful segment has termed the group's outlook on the world as Afropolitan. Unlike their predecessors, the Afropolitan group references and claims wherever work or pleasure takes them as theirs. Their stories, films and poems traverse Lagos, Accra, Harare, London, Kampala, Addis Ababa, Detroit, Johannesburg, Busan, Brussels and Nairobi. In the texts, occupying many time zones, sometimes simultaneously, is real and not magical. Fluency in several registers of English is simply assumed by the characters.  
Why then, we shall be asking, does the need to locate a "home" somewhere in Africa haunt all the texts, although it is clear that the satisfaction of arriving at such a place is almost always fleeting?  
Grading & Evaluation: Punctual and regular attendance; 2 oral presentations; 3 analytical papers 
Tentative Reading List:  J. P. Clark, America, their America (1962); Dinaw Mengestu, The Beautiful Things that Heaven Bears (2007);  Teju Cole, Open City (2011);  NoViolet Bulawayo, We Need New Names (2013); Taiye Selasi, Ghana Must Go (2013); Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Americanah (2014); Nicole Armateifio, "An African City" (2014); Nnedi Okorafor, Lagoon (2014); Ryan Coogler, "Black Panther" (2018) 

English 4587: Studies in Asian American Literature and Culture 
Instructor:
Pranav Jani 
From the stereotype of the "model minority" to the caricature of Apu on "The Simpsons," South Asians continue to be regarded as strange, exotic Others in the US.  This course, focused on the voices of South Asian migrants themselves, gives an inside look on "desi" literature and culture that shatters simple myths and narratives. Through novels, short stories, poetry, music videos and film by and about South Asians from the US, UK, Kenya and elsewhere, students will learn about complex histories of migration and empire that have shaped this diaspora.   
Requirements: intensive, class participation, 3 papers, oral presentation, online discussion. 

English 4590.02H: The Renaissance—Mixed Media Before the Modern Age
Instructor:
Hannibal Hamlin 
Mixing media was a thing long before the digital age. Renaissance writers, artists and musicians didn't need cameras, video, recording and the web to produce exciting works of art that delighted both the eye and the ear, that blended words and music, poetry and images, print and pictures, and performances that added to all this dance, costume, spectacle, stage machinery, and even the court or cityscape itself. This course will explore the inventive mixed media of the Renaissance, including songs of all sorts (ballads, ayres, street cries, hymns), emblems (a riddling blend of poetry, symbolic images, cryptic mottoes and quotations), proto-graphic-novel-type combinations of art and text, the lavish performance-art extravaganzas of the court masque and the too-often-neglected multiple media of popular plays. Especially in his late plays, Shakespeare included dancing, singing, instrumental music, visual images and arresting stage mechanics. Works will include songs by John Dowland, Thomas Campion and Henry Lawes, emblems by Geoffrey Whitney, Francis Quarles and George Wither, the remarkable cut-and-paste illustrated Bibles of the Ferrar women of Little Gidding, the court masques of Ben Jonson (poet), Alfonso Ferrabosco (composer) and Inigo Jones (designer and architect), and Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale. We'll consider what happens when different media are combined into a single synaesthetic experience, and we may also think about the challenges of preserving, recapturing, studying and appreciating these works in the twenty-first century. Students with an interest in music, painting, design and other arts are most welcome, but no particular expertise in non-literary media is required. 

English 4591.01H: Special Topics in the Study of Creative Writing—Retellings and Responses
Instructor:
Michelle Herman 
In this course, we'll look at retellings and reimaginings of fairy tales and bible stories, beloved children's stories, Shakespeare's plays, Chekhov's stories and other works of literature - along with fiction about real people that "retells" their lives--which we will read alongside the material that inspired them. And then you will make your own short retelling in the genre of your choice. Final projects will be longer retellings of a work you choose yourself - one we have not looked at in the course. 
For more information, contact Professor Michelle Herman at herman.2@osu.edu or stop in to see her in 468 Denney Hall any Wednesday this autumn between 10:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. (or email her for an appointment at a more convenient time). If you are an honors student who has taken English 2265, 2266, 2267, or 2268, you will not need Professor Herman's permission to register for the course. All others are invited - but please be prepared to show/send Professor Herman a sample of work you have produced in your discipline. Honors standing is not necessary.

English 4591.02H: Special Topics in the Study of Rhetoric—Communicating about/with Illness and Disability
Instructor:
Margaret Price 
We spend each day in a flood of communication about illness and disability (and related ideas, including “health,” “wellness,” and “self-care”). In the United States, we spend almost $10,000 per person per year on health care, while also being bombarded with information about the “Campus Mental Health Crisis.” Buzzfeed videos show us the latest stair-climbing wheelchair; Twitter debates Serena Williams’s choice of athletic attire; and Facebook is filled with requests to donate to GoFundMe for a person whose life-saving surgery has left them bankrupt. We, as writers and readers, are both the authors and the audience of all this information. The purpose of this course is to offer you a chance to think through and discuss these complicated discourses—what they say, how they circulate, what cultural stories they unearth and ultimately what they mean for you and your own understanding of health and illness.

English 4592: Special Topics in Women in Literature and Culture — The Marriage Plot, Then and Now 
Instructor:
Robyn Warhol 
Girl meets boy, girl loses boy, girl marries boy in the end. . . 
But does she always have to?
This course traces the convention of the marriage plot from its literary roots in Shakespeare’s comedies, through its flowering in Jane Austen and Charlotte Brontë, to its dominance in mainstream U.S. popular culture throughout the twentieth century and today. Looking at Hollywood films, T.V. shows, popular novels and literary fiction, we will identify the 21st-century strongholds of the marriage plot and explore variations, subversions and queerings of the form. Readings will include Stephanie Coontz’s 2006 Marriage: A History, or, How Love Conquered Marriage;Shakespeare’s Much Ado about Nothing (1598); Austen’s Persuasion (1818); Brontë’s Jane Eyre(1847); Truman Capote’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1958); and Alice Walker’s The Color Purple (1983), as well as selected examples from U.S. popular culture. 

English 4592 (20 and 30): Special Topics in Women in Literature and Culture—Womanhood in Black and White 
Instructor:
Koritha Mitchell 
What is womanhood in the United States? How does being white shape one's womanhood? How does not being considered white affect one's experience of womanhood? How does being cis gender determine experience? This class will explore questions like these while examining how American authors have addressed them creatively. Likely authors include Kate Chopin, Frances E. W. Harper, Jhumpa Lahiri, Julie Otsuka, Toni Morrison, and Jaqueline Woodson. 

English 4595: Literature and Law 
Instructor:
Clare Simmons 
"Literature and Law" is a course in the representation of law in literature and the literary analysis of legal discourse; it is not a course in the study of law, but should be of interest to anyone who wants to engage with the role of law in culture; the legal and literary representation of human rights; and how law uses language. Literature and Law can be applied towards the English major and Human Rights minor; many students from other departments also take it to fulfill upper-level course requirements, so the course provides an excellent opportunity to meet students from a wide variety of fields who are interested in law and perhaps thinking about Law School. We will read both some legal materials and some literature that represents law in action. The special topic of this course is "The Outsider in the Court Room," so we will read some actual cases and also a variety of fictional representations of law in action, and consider how the rights of outsiders are protected, or sometimes forgotten, by the law. We will also practice some court-room procedures of our own in mock=trials. Readings will include a 2000-year-old murder trial; some medieval animal trials; Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice; the Amistad trial; Wilkie Collins's novel The Law and the Lady; Reginald Rose's Twelve Angry Men; and a collection of famous trials available online. Students will be responsible for regular attendance and participation, including in group mock-trials; three short case briefs; a longer research paper; and reading questions. 

English 4998H: Honors Undergraduate Research in English  
Instructor:
Staff 
Undergraduate research in variable topics; independent study.  
Prereq: Honors standing, and permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs or 3 completions. This course is graded S/U. 


5000-level

 

English 5189s/CompStd 5189s: Ohio Field School                                                         Instructor: Jasper Waugh-Quasebarth and Katherine Borland 
The Ohio Field Schools Course provides an introduction to ethnographic field methods (participant-observation, writing field notes, photographic documentation, audio-interviewing), archiving and the public exhibition of research for both undergraduates and graduate students. Students will contribute to a team-based, immersive research project designed to document the ways that diverse communities express and preserve a sense of place in the face of economic, environmental and cultural change. This year’s projects involve working with grassroots organizations on succession planning.The semester-long, experientially-based course will consist of three parts: 

  • Introduction to fieldwork (on OSU campus in Columbus) 
  • A one-week field experience in Perry County during spring break (where students will reside together on-site)  
  • Accessioning, digital gallery preparation and reflection (on OSU campus in Columbus) 

Thus, throughout the semester, students will practice all of the skills necessary to construct a permanent record of local expressive culture that will be accessible to future researchers and community members. Participation in all parts of the course is required.

*Advanced undergraduate students are encouraged to enroll in 5000-level courses.* 

English 5664: Studies in Graphic Narrative: Comics, History and Time 
Instructor:
James Phelan 
The focus of this course will be graphic medicine: fiction and nonfiction narrative about illness and disability.  We'll read the Graphic Medicine Manifesto, some other  work on comics theory, and some other work in narrative theory.  But the main focus will be on the practice of graphic artists, including Alison Bechdel, Ian Williams, Ellen Forney, and many others.  Students will do agenda settings, two analytic papers, and will try their hands at graphic storytelling.  By the end of the course, students should have a great appreciation for the power of graphic narrative and its efficacy (and limits) in medical situations.

*Advanced undergraduate students are encouraged to enroll in 5000-level courses.* 

English 5720.01: Graduate Studies in Shakespeare 
Instructor:
Jennifer Higginbotham 
This course is designed for teachers pursuing an MA in English who want to achieve an advanced knowledge of Shakespeare. Emphasis will be on understanding Shakespeare’s work in historical context and exploring the most up-to-date research on his theatrical practices, the early history of his plays in print, and scholarly methods for understanding his work. Readings will include representative works from his comedies, tragedies, and histories as well as examples of literary criticism that have impacted how we read, watch, and think about Shakespeare.

*Advanced undergraduate students are encouraged to enroll in 5000-level courses.*

Text

1000-level


English 1109: Intensive Writing and Reading
Instructor:
 Staff
Provides intensive practice in integrating academic reading and writing.

English 1110.01: First-Year English Composition
Instructor:
 Cathy Ryan
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers.
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01: First-Year English Composition
Instructor: 
Sydney Varajon
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers.
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01: First-Year English Composition
Instructor:
 Mira Kafantaris
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers.
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01: First-Year English Composition
Instructor:
 Staff
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers.
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.02: First-Year English Composition
Instructor:
 Cathy Ryan
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers. Taught with an emphasis on literary texts.
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.02: First-Year English Composition
Instructor:
 Francis Donoghue
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers. Taught with an emphasis on literary texts.
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.03: First-Year English Composition — Meanings Behind Movie Posters
Instructor:
 Christiane Buuck
Intensive practice in fundamentals of expository writing illustrated in the student's own writing and essays of professional writers; offered in a small class setting and linked with an individual tutoring component in its concurrent course, 1193. This course is available for EM credit only through the AP program.
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1193: Individual Studies
Instructor:
 Martha Sims
Intensive practice in the fundamentals of expository writing.


2000-level

 

English 2201: Selected Works of British Literature — Medieval through 1800
Instructor:
 Karen Winstead and Staff
This survey will introduce students to the vibrant minds and culture that produced the masterpieces of our British literary heritage. Students will sample the writings of poets, playwrights, essayists and novelists including Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton and Johnson. Students will get to know the worlds they inhabited, the issues they cared about and how they may have thought about themselves as artists and human beings. While exploring the past, students will find surprising precedents for popular genres of our own day, including horror, romance and graphic narrative.
English 2201 is a foundational course for English majors but it is also a rewarding experience for anyone seeking an appreciation of our literary heritage. Lectures will sketch out the contours of literary history and weekly recitations will provide opportunities for group close reading and discussion. Requirements include a final exam, a journal of responses to the readings and weekly online quizzes on the lectures.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2201H: Selected Works of British Literature — Medieval through 1800
Instructor:
 Leslie Lockett
This course introduces students to some of the major British literary texts written from the early Middle Ages through the late eighteenth century, including Beowulf, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Milton's Paradise Lost and Aphra Behn's Oroonoko. Our approach to the literature will emphasize close reading, form and genre, and historical context. Students will develop their research skills by means of a researched essay or creative project. Other requirements include three response papers and a final exam.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2220: Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructors:
 Hannibal Hamlin
For four centuries now, William Shakespeare has been widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language. He's certainly the most influential. More has been written about Shakespeare than any other writer in the history of the world, no joke. His plays have been adapted into countless other plays, novels, poems, music, paintings, films, TV shows and comics, and not only in English but in German, Russian, Spanish, Japanese, Hindi and Yoruba. We will read a sampling of Shakespeare's plays in a variety of genres and over the course of his career. We'll think about how his plays work as theater; how he adapts and transforms the source material on which so many of his plays depend; how Shakespeare can be such an "original" when he borrows so much from other writers; how he can create such deep and realistic characters; and how it is that Shakespeare can accomplish all of the above (and more) through language. What we'll discover is that, as one critic put it, the remarkable thing about Shakespeare is that he is really very good - in spite of all the people who say he is very good. Plays will include Henry IV Part 1A Midsummer Night's DreamHamletMacbeth and Cymbeline, and we'll also read some non-dramatic poems.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2220: Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructors:
 Luke Wilson
Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2220: Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructors:
 Staff
Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2220H: Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructor:
 Sarah Neville
This class for honors students will approach a selection of Shakespeare's most and least-known plays through several methods, examining these works not only as historical artifacts rooted in the time and place of their creation, but also as spectacles that are best illuminated by live performance. In order to better enable us to consider the ways that staged properties and special effects are crucial parts of Shakespeare's stagecraft, this section of "Introduction to Shakespeare" is especially interested in the practical means through which Shakespeare's plays (and the earliest printed books they appeared in) resonate with both historical and contemporary audiences and readers. Through in-class exercises, field trips, and assignments in costuming, casting, producing and directing, we will seek to answer questions like:

  • How was the English stage of 1592 different from a typical American stage of 2019?
  • How does a production pretend to cut someone's hands off?
  • How can two unrelated actors simulate playing twins?
  • What did Elizabethans think a medieval battle looked like?
  • How does a dead character returning as a ghost look differently from the way he did when he was alive?
  • What happens when a boy actor plays a female role? or a female actor plays a male one?
  • Who censored Shakespeare's plays, and why?

Class progress will be evaluated by research-based writing assignments, quizzes, a creative group project and a final exam.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2260: Introduction to Poetry
Instructor:
 Jennifer Higginbotham
This is a class about how to read a poem. We'll be doing the literary equivalent of taking apart an engine to see how it works, breaking down poetry into its various components, including word choice, sentence structure, figures of speech, meter, rhyme, structure and genre. Sheila Wolosky's The Art of Poetry will be our guiding text along with a variety of poems from the English tradition, from the sixteenth century to the present day.
GE: Literature

English 2260: Introduction to Poetry
Instructor:
 Staff
Designed to help students understand and appreciate poetry through an intensive study of a representative group of poems.
GE: Literature

English 2261: Introduction to Fiction
Instructors:
 Sandra MacPherson
Examination of the elements of fiction — plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc. — and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.
GE: Literature

English 2261: Introduction to Fiction — "Game of Thrones" as Literature
Instructors:
 Elizabeth Renker
This new class celebrates the conclusion to a beloved HBO series.  Even the most dedicated fans might not realize that Game of Thrones is also a skilled and complex work of literature tied to a long history of literary concepts and approaches. This class will train you in core analytical methods that will enable newcomers to the series as well as longstanding fans to understand Game of Thrones at a deeper level of richness and pleasure. This is a second-session autumn semester class that will proceed at a double-time pace. We will thus focus only on the first two seasons of the HBO series, although all students are required to watch the entire series before our class begins. (We will not read or discuss the books by George R.R. Martin.) Class sessions on TWTh will run as a mixture of short lecture and discussion; come to class every day prepared and ready to apply the terms and skills we are learning. Fri. classes will be conducted online in the form of a short (250-500 word) written exercise applying what we have learned that week. Textbooks: an HBO subscription; readings posted on Carmen. Requirements: daily attendance; active participation in discussion; daily in-class brief quizzes; short (250-500 word) weekly written exercises on Fridays.
GE: Literature

English2261: Introduction to Fiction
Instructors:
 David Brewer
This course will examine the central building blocks of fiction—plot, character, narration/point of view and setting—and how they contribute to our reading experience. Our emphasis throughout will be on how fiction works and why we should care about its workings. Likely readings will include The Secret HistoryGone GirlIn Cold BloodAlice's Adventures in Wonderland and stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, Donald Ray Pollock, Shirley Jackson, James Thurber, Viet Thahn Nguyen, H. P. Lovecraft and Claire Voye Watkins. Assignments will include a weekly reading journal, four short written exercises, a final project and active participation in our discussions.
GE: Literature

English 2261: Introduction to Fiction
Instructors:
 Staff
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.
GE: Literature

English 2261H: Introduction to Fiction
Instructors:
 Jessica Prinz
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.
GE: Literature

English 2263 (10): Introduction to Film
Instructor:
 Frederick Luis Aldama and Staff
This course will offer methods and approaches for understanding the devices used (mise-en-scene, lensing, sound, editing, casting and so on) by film directors to give shape to their various distillations and reconstructions of the building blocks of reality. We will be attuned to how films trigger our perception, thought, and feeling systems. We will explore the sociopolitical contexts of making, distributing, and consuming film. We will explore how a film director gives shape through visual and auditory means to a filmic blueprint that triggers real emotions and thoughts about the world. We will view and analyze: Wes Andersen's The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014); Darren Aronofsky's Black Swan (2010); Ryan Coogler's Black Panther (2017); Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now(1979); Cary Joji Fukunaga's Sin Nombre (2009); Barry Jenkins's Moonlight (2016); Richard Kelly's Donnie Darko (2001); Stanley Kubrik's 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) & The Shining (1980); Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing (1989); Terence Malick's Badlands (1973); Fernando Meirelles's City of God(2002); George Miller's Mad Max: Fury Road (2015); Christopher Nolan's Memento (2000) & The Dark Knight (2008); Jordan Peele's Get Out (2017); Jason Reitman's Juno (2007); Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction (1994); Guillermo del Toro's The Shape of Water (2017); Orson Wells's Touch of Evil(1968); Joe Wright's Atonement (2007).
GE: VPA

English 2264: Introduction to Popular Culture Studies
Instructor:
 Jared Gardner
Introduction to the analysis of popular culture texts.
GE: Cultures & Ideas.
*This is a combined section class. Cross-listed in CompStd.

English 2264: Introduction to Popular Culture Studies
Instructor:
 Staff
Introduction to the analysis of popular culture texts.
GE: Cultures & Ideas.
*This is a combined section class. Cross-listed in CompStd.

English 2265 (10): Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructors:
 Kirsten Edwards
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.

English 2265 (20): Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructors:
 Meagan McAlister
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.

English 2265 (30): Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructors:
 Krishna Mishra
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.

English 2265 (40): Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructors:
 Sheldon Costa
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.

English 2266: Introductory Poetry Writing
Instructors:
 Kaiya Gordon
In this introductory level poetry workshop, you will learn how to be a more adept poetry reader, writer and community member. By the end of the class, you will have developed tools and techniques for your craft, be fluent in the landscape of contemporary poetry and have participated in the workshopping of poems by yourself and your classmates. Authors taught will include Claudia Rankine, Franny Choi and Columbus's own Ruth Awad, as well as a variety of other writers exploring the edges of genre and poetic appplication.
Prereq: 1110. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.

English 2266: Introductory Poetry Writing
Instructors:
 Margaret Colvett
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, composition, and prosody; practice in the writing of poetry; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published poems by established poets. Prereq: 1110. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.

English 2267: Introduction to Creative Writing
Instructor:
 Kamal Kimball
"Don't tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass." --Anton Chekhov          
The goal of this course is to introduce you to writing as an artistic practice. Students will learn how to capture moments from life, details like Chekhov's glint of light on broken glass, and turn them into unique expressions that are all your own. The art and craft of writing is a process of turning inward and a method of looking outward. In this course, student will do both. The course will focus on prompted creative writing assignments which will allow you to turn inward and explore new writing strategies, helping you to strengthen your voice. Everyone has a story to tell and this course will help you become a stronger writer, regardless of starting experience level. Students will also turn outward via peer workshops, readings, and informative class discussions. Students will have the opportunity to share their writing in a supportive environment for thoughtful feedback from a group of engaged peers. This course will include meaningful engagement with contemporary 20th century writing.

English 2267: Introduction to Creative Writing
Instructor:
 Molly Oritz
The purpose of this class is to introduce you to writing as an artistic practice. We will begin by approaching each genre (creative nonfiction, poetry, and fiction) as readers, analyzing a wide range of styles and forms to better situate ourselves within the current state of contemporary literature. From these texts, we will uncover tricks and tools that will help in the development of your own unique voice. In addition to poems, essays, and short stories, we will be reading several craft pieces, or instructional texts on the art of writing. Our reading list is diverse and challenging, and I ask and expect you to read with an open mind. Some possible authors include: Danez Smith, Layli Long Soldier, Solmaz Sharif, Ocean Vuong, Kaveh Akbar, Tracy K. Smith, Leslie Jamison, Lia Purpura, Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib, Alexander Chee, Eula Biss, Diane Cook, Miranda July, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Carmen Maria Machado. The rest of our time together will be a workshop. This means that you will read your peers’ writing closely, offering sincere and engaged feedback in the form of both written responses and in-class discussion. You will also share your own writing with the class and get the chance to see your work from the perspective of a committed, generous, detail-oriented readership. Each student will workshop one poem, one short essay, and one short story over the course of the term. Through this, you will expand your range of writing skills—pushing yourself to be curious, fearless, and voracious—as a way of getting closer to understanding both who you already are as a writer, and who you might want to become. 

English 2268 (10): Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor:
 Sophie Newman
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, and composition; practice in the writing of creative nonfiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published essays by masters of the many forms of creative nonfiction.

English 2268 (20): Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor:
 David Grandouiller
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, and composition; practice in the writing of creative nonfiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published essays by masters of the many forms of creative nonfiction.

English 2269: Digital Media Composing
Instructor:
 Staff
A composition course in which students analyze and compose digital media texts while studying complex forms and practices of textual production.
GE: VPA

English 2275: Thematic Approaches to Literature—Slavery and the Novel, 1660-1990
Instructor:
 Roxann Wheeler
During this time period, concepts of slavery shifted from featuring European-born slaves in the Mediterranean to featuring African-born slaves in the Caribbean and Europe. The course investigates the racial, gender and class dynamics of the storylines of literature during the height of slavery and abolition. We will read a small selection of the neo-slave narratives written in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries that reflect critically on the earlier period.
GE: Literature

English 2276: Arts of Persuasion
Instructor:
 Staff
Introduces students to the study and practice of rhetoric and how arguments are shaped by technology, media and cultural contexts.
GE: Cultures & Ideas

English 2277: Introduction to Disability Studies
Instructor:
 Staff
This course investigates the ways that disability is composed.
GE: Cultures & Ideas

English 2280H: The English Bible —The Bible as Literature
Instructor:
 Hannibal Hamlin
The Bible contains some of the weirdest and most wonderful literature you will ever read, and there is certainly no book that has had a greater influence on English and American literature from Beowulf to Paradise LostPilgrim’s Progress to The Chronicles of Narnia, Whitman’s Song of Myselfto Morrison’s Song of Solomon. We will read a selection of biblical books in order to gain some appreciation of the Bible’s wide range of literary genres, forms, styles and topics. Our discussion will include the nature of biblical narrative and characterization, the function of prophecy and its relation to history, the peculiar nature of biblical poetry, so-called Wisdom literature, anomalous books like Job and The Song of Songs (including the historical process of canonization that made them “biblical” and the kinds of interpretation that have been used to make them less strange), the relationship between (in traditional Christian terms) the Old and New Testaments (including typology, the symbolic linking of characters, events, themes, and images in the books before and after the Incarnation) and the unity (or lack thereof) of the Bible as a whole. As occasion warrants, we will also look at some of the diverse ways the Bible has been read and interpreted—the stranger the better—by poets and writers, artists and film-makers over the past millennia.

*Do note: this is NOT a course in religion, but rather an English course on the Bible as a literary work. Any and all faiths, or none, are welcome, and none will be privileged. 
*Text: The English Bible: King James Version (2 vols.), ed. Herbert Marks (1) and Gerald Hammond and Austin Busch (2), Norton Critical Edition
*Course requirements: Evaluation will be based on active participation in class discussion and activities, regular reading quizzes, two short essays, a mid-term test and a final exam.
GE: Literature

English 2281: Introduction to African-American Literature
Instructor:
 Koritha Mitchell
A study of representative literary works by African-American writers from 1760 to the present.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
*This is a combined lecture class. Cross-listed in AfAmASt

English 2282: Introduction to Queer Studies — Queer & Trans Cultures and Movements
Instructors:
 Staff
Introduces and problematizes foundational concepts of the interdisciplinary field of queer studies, highlighting the intersections of sexuality with race, class, and nationality.
GE: Cultures & Ideas
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
*This is a combined section class. Cross-listed in WGSS.

English 2367.01: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience
Instructors:
 Staff
Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

English 2367.02: Literature in the U.S. Experience
Instructor:
 Staff
Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

English 2367.02H: Literature in the U.S. Experience
Instructor:
 Staff
Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

English 2367.03: Documentary in the U.S. Experience
Instructor:
 Staff
An intermediate course that extends and refines skills in critical reading and expository writing through analysis of written texts, video and documentaries.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)

English 2367.05: The U.S. Folk Experience
Instructor:
 Martha Sims
Concepts of American folklore and ethnography; folk groups, tradition, and fieldwork methodology; how these contribute to the development of critical reading, writing and thinking skills.
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)

English 2367.05H: The U.S. Folk Experience
Instructor:
 Amy Shuman
This course teaches students to listen, observe and write about what they learn using three different writing styles. We will spend time designing a project and deciding on a cultural site for students' listening and observing. The cultural site could be an artistic practice involving food, dance, music, etc. or a          
social/cultural practice involving a group students belong to. Students will have the opportunity to use three writing styles to describe the same cultural event or practice: an objective, third person paper; a confessional first person paper and a third paper in which students select the style most appropriate for their subject matter. We will work on revising and editing, and students will revise each of their papers and comment on other students' papers. For the final paper, students will be asked to write a paragraph explaining their stylistic choice.
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)

English 2367.06: Composing Disability in the U.S.
Instructor:
 Kelsey Busby
Our course will explore how texts portray the future; specifically, we will focus on representations of the future that exclude marginalized communities, including people with disabilities. Additionally, our course will focus on providing a foundation for theoretical approaches in disability studies and futurity studies. We will read texts written by disabled and non-disabled writers. We will explore how futurity often adopts a medical model of disability, one which argues that an ideal future is one where disabilities have been cured. Through discussions of these representations, we will not only be able to analyze and think critically about fictional and non-fictional accounts of disability, but we will also understand responses to disability in contemporary culture. We will also learn how to recognize and respond to ableist language and the exclusion of disabled voices and identities. We will bring our conversations about disability and futurity in line with utopianism. In order to speculate about the future — about utopia — one would have to imagine having power to enact this change. 

Students will be asked to address topics within disability studies, utopian studies and futurity studies through acknowledging these topics’ veracity in specific contemporary examples and fields. Ultimately, this class seeks to articulate a disabled future: one where utopianism and critical futurity can be ideological tools motivating activist intervention and social dreaming. This course will emphasize interdisciplinary interactions through discussions, texts, and writing projects and will ask students to challenge their growing skills in composition and analysis through multimodal assignments.

*2367.06 can be taken for credit towards the undergraduate disability studies minor. Please see the main disabilities studies page for more information.
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)

English 2367.07S: Literacy Narratives of Black Columbus (Service Learning)
Instructor:
 Beverly Moss
English 2367.07S satisfies the University’s GE requirement for social diversity and the U.S. experience and second-level writing. The primary goals of this course are to sharpen your expository writing, critical thinking and analytical skills through a service-learning framework. The “S” in the course number means that this second-level writing class has been designated as a service learning writing course. You will read about the importance of undertaking life history and literacy narrative projects, with a particular focus on preserving the literacy history of Columbus-area Black communities. Collecting and analyzing literacy narratives (or literacy stories) is an important research strategy that can be used to document the history and current activities of any community. It is especially important in Black communities where their/our literacy practices have often been under-reported or negatively characterized.
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)

English2463: Introduction to Video Games Analysis
Instructor:
 Staff
An introduction to humanities-based methods of analyzing and interpreting video games in terms of form, genre, style and theory. No background in video game play is necessary. All students will have regular opportunities for hands-on experience with different game types and genres in both the computer-based classroom and the Department of English Video Game Lab.
GE: VPA


3000-level

 

English 3150: Career Preparation for Humanities Majors
Instructor:
 Jennifer Patton
This general elective course helps English majors and students from other Humanities disciplines to explore and prepare for careers after graduation. Students will analyze texts to gain a practical and theoretical understanding of the world of work. They will learn to identify their own strengths and preferences to guide their job activity and career choices.

English 3271: Structure of the English Language
Instructor:
 Staff
Students learn basic characteristics of English linguistics focusing on the basic building blocks of language; the sounds of English and how they are put together, word formation processes and rules for combining words into utterances/sentences. Students investigate and explore linguistic variation, accents of American English and the implications of language evaluation in educational settings.
GE: Cultures & Ideas

English 3304: Business and Professional Writing
Instructor:
 Christa Teston
In this course students will learn principles and practices associated with writing well in business and professional contexts. Students will receive feedback on prose writing and receive several opportunities to refine their style, organization and collaborative writing strategies. Most in-class time will involve workshopping course deliverables and writing collaboratively.

English 3304: Business and Professional Writing
Instructor:
 John Jones
The study of principles and practices of business and professional writing.

English 3304: Business and Professional Writing
Instructor:
 Yanar Hashlamon
This course examines the writing practices and contemporary issues workers face in professional environments. Students will produce documents in different modes, including text, image and video, focusing on accessible and ethical communication practices. This is a community-oriented class, encouraging intersectional class consciousness towards the Columbus area and its populations both represented and absent from our classroom. Students will be given time in-class to complete assignments and write collaboratively.  

English 3304: Business and Professional Writing
Instructor:
 Jason Collins
The study of principles and practices of business and professional writing.

English 3305: Technical Writing
Instructor:
 Susan Lang
Study of principles and practices of technical writing. Emphasis on the style, organization and conventions of technical and research reports, proposals, memoranda, professional correspondence, etc.

English 3305: Technical Writing
Instructor:
 Staff
Study of principles and practices of technical writing. Emphasis on the style, organization and conventions of technical and research reports, proposals, memoranda, professional correspondence, etc.

English 3361: Narrative and Medicine
Instructor:
 Jim Phelan
This course explores the idea that narrative competence increases medical competence. In other words, it investigates the hypothesis that medical practitioners who become aware of the importance of stories and storytelling and knowledgeable about how stories work will become more effective caregivers. As we test that hypothesis, we will address the following questions: How does narrative give us greater insight into illness, medical treatment, doctor-patient relationships and other aspects of health and medicine? How do illness and other experiences within the realm of medicine influence ways of telling stories? How do doctors' perspectives and patients' perspectives differ, and what, if anything, should be done to close those differences? In order to increase our own narrative competence, we will look at narrative in different media--drama, print (fiction and nonfiction), comics and film--and consider core concepts of narrative (plot, character, space, time, perspective, dialogue, ethics and aesthetics). We will also consider a range of medical conditions and issues from mortality to ethics, from cancer (illness and treatment) to kidney transplants. Since the course is populated by students majoring in a great variety of disciplines, we will also consider how our different disciplinary perspectives relate to each other: to what extent do they overlap, complement, or occasionally conflict with each other as we think about the nexus between narrative and medicine?
GE: Literature

English 3364: Special Topics in Popular Culture — Insurgent Youth: Punk, Riot Grrrl and Black Metal
Instructor:
 Thomas Davis
How do cultural worlds respond to moments of political distress? How can music, art and lifestyles model other ways of living and thinking? This class pursues these two questions by investigating three distinct subcultures: punk, riot grrrl and black metal. We will listen to a wide range of music, placing it in its historical context and tracing its lasting influences. Readings and viewings will range across documentary films, memoirs, cultural theory, zines and other literary and visual texts. Our class will also host visits from music journalists, scholars and participants in these three subcultures.
GE: Cultures & Ideas

English 3372 (10): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy
Instructor:
 Jian Chen
Examining science fiction and/or fantasy.
GE: Literature

English 3372 (20): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy: Feminism and Science Fiction
Instructor:
 Beth Hewitt
Since Mary Shelley birthed Frankenstein’s monster, science fiction has been devoted to issues that are crucial to the history of feminism: alterity and equity. The imagination of other worlds, other places, other species, other laws has the unique ability to make the familiarities of sexism strange. In this class, we will read some of the canonical texts of science fiction focused on issues involving sexuality, gender, reproduction and corporeality, including Mary Shelley, Ursula LeGuin, Margaret Atwood, James Tiptree, Jr., Samuel Delany, Judith Merril and Octavia Butler.
GE: Literature

English 3372 (50): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy
Instructor:
 Katelyn Hartke
Examining science fiction and/or fantasy. Octavia Butler.
GE: Literature

English 3378: Special Topics in Film and Literature — Film and Comics: Race, Class, Sexuality and Differently Abled
Instructor:
 Frederick Aldama
Have you ever wondered why you love watching superhero movies or reading comics? Why do we pay money to go see something that we know is clearly not real? This course examines the art of film and comics storytelling and, simultaneously, the emotion and cognitive responses that they trigger. We will focus on the contemporary period to see how filmmakers and comic book creators build their storyworlds as well as audience consumption. We will also explore the crosspollination of devices used to give shape to filmic and comic book storytelling modes. We will acquire theoretical concepts and tools to understand better how our set of films and comics are built and how they might make (or not) new our perception, thought, and feeling concerning issues of racism, ableism, misogyny, homophobia and the like.

We will view and analyze: Patty Jenkins's Wonder Woman (2017); Jon Favreau's Iron Man (2008); George Miller's Mad Max: Fury Road (2015); Christopher Nolan's Batman Begins (2005), The Dark Knight (2008), The Dark Knight Rises (2012); M. Night Shyamalan's Unbreakable (2000); Guillermo del Toro's Pacific Rim (2013); Danny Boyle's 28 Days Later (2002); James Mangold's Logan (2017); Zack Snyder's Justice League (2017); Ryan Coogler's Black Panther (2018); Taika Waititi's Thor: Ragnarok (2017); Edgar Wright's Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (2010); Bob Persichetti et al.: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (2018); Jill Thompson's Wonder Woman: The True Amazon (2016); George Miller et al.: Mad Max: Fury Road (2015); Bryan Lee O'Malley Scott Pilgrim vs. the World Vol. 1 (2004); Steve Niles's 28 Days Later: Aftermath; Travis Beacham's Pacific Rim: Tales from the Drift (2016); Ta-Nehisi Coates' Black Panther & the Crew (2017).
GE: Cultures & Ideas

English 3379: Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy
Instructor:
 Susan Lang
Introduction to the interrelated fields of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy, familiarizing students with key concepts that underlie work in these interrelated fields and to the scholarly methods of WRL. Together, this discipline studies the ways people use language and other symbols to convey messages, persuade audiences and create meaning, and how these practices are learned and taught.

English3379: Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy
Instructor:
 John Jones
Introduction to the interrelated fields of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy, familiarizing students with key concepts that underlie work in these interrelated fields and to the scholarly methods of WRL. Together, this discipline studies the ways people use language and other symbols to convey messages, persuade audiences and create meaning, and how these practices are learned and taught.

English 3398 (10): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
 Jacob Risinger
In this gateway course, we will take our cue from one of George Orwell’s famous lines: “If people cannot write well, they cannot think well, and if they cannot think well, others will do their thinking for them.” Over the course of the semester, our weekly readings, discussions and informal exercises will work to annihilate old patterns of complacent reading—leaving in their place the analytical skills and rhetorical strategies you need to establish your own critical/original perspective on literary texts. We will attend to the practical work of conducting literary research and writing solid, well-argued essays—but we will also practice using literary theory and various methods of criticism to identify new levels of meaning, even in familiar or (seemingly) straightforward texts. The hard work of writing and analysis will be supplemented by an array of engaging texts. Along the way, we’ll read poetry by W.B. Yeats, Elizabeth Bishop and Claudia Rankine; Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale; Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; and Jesmyn Ward’s novel Salvage the Bones (recipient of the 2011 National Book Award). Requirements will include attendance, active participation, informal writing exercises and five essays.

English 3398 (20): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
 Jill Galvan
This course is designed to strengthen skills in interpretive reading and writing. It will help students with their English major courses, as well as cultivate their fluency in analyzing texts of all kinds, beyond the classroom. Our focus will be on reading with an eye for fine detail and on constructing logical, well-evidenced arguments. The syllabus will cover the major genres--novel, short story, poetry, drama and possibly film--and will range from the classic to the contemporary. A very tentative list for the short stories and novels includes works by Herman Melville, Robert Louis Stevenson, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Kate Chopin, Raymond Carver, Octavia Butler, Jhumpa Lahiri, Alison Bechdel, Justin Torres and Carmen Machado. In class, I will be providing guidance, terminology and a critical framework, but most meetings will be run as active discussions. Tentative assignments: two papers, 3-5 pages each; two papers, 5-7 pages each; a critical research exercise; regular reading quizzes and engaged class participation.

English 3398 (30): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
 Susan Williams
This course's purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing. We will use a textbook, Steven Lynn's Texts and Contexts, to study a range of critical approaches to literary study and apply them to poems and short stories. We will also study Celeste Ng's Little Fires Everywhere as a re-reading of Nathaniel Hawthorne's Scarlet Letter, considering how authors build on each other as they practice their craft.

English 3398: Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
 Francis Donoghue
This course's purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing.

English 3398: Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
 Christopher Jones
This course's purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing.

English 3398: Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
 Sarah Neville
This class is designed to support students in developing the skills they need to be successful English majors. Over the course of the term students will learn the types, tools and methods of literary criticism that English scholars employ as they construct projects in both print and digital media. Along the way we will read a novel by Robertson Davies, short stories by Dorothy Parker, Lorrie Moore, Donald Barthelme and George Saunders, a play by Djanet Sears and poems by Billy-Ray Belcourt. Students will complete in-class exercises and multiple short writing assignments that ultimately build toward a longer research paper.

English 3405 (10): Special Topics in Professional Communication — Technical Editing
Instructor:
 Jonathan Buehl
An introduction to the skills and processes used when editing technical documents. No background in technical content areas or technical writing is required to do well in this class.

English 3465 (20): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing
Instructor: 
Christopher Santantasio
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing fiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are 

English 3465 (30): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing — Writing Against Convention
Instructor: Scott Broker
In this intermediate fiction course, we will be focusing our attention on reading and writing work that challenges traditional modes of narrative realism. From genre blending to structural innovation, unconventional subject matter to non-standard logic, we will pursue and embrace that which is often seen as strange, taboo, uncanny or queer, working to understand how these stories work in relation to the conventions of fiction. We will begin by analyzing a wide range of texts to situate ourselves within the history of unconventional writing. From these stories, we will pull tricks and tools that will help in the development of our own unique voices. The reading list is diverse and challenging, and I ask and expect you to read with an open mind. Some possible authors include: Diane Cook, Mariana Enriquez, Samanta Schweblin, Deb Olin Unferth, Miranda July, Ben Marcus, Jamaica Kincaid, Lesley Nneka Arimah, Carmen Maria Machado, Kelly Link, Karen Russell, Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah, Joy Williams, Ottessa Moshfegh, Helen Oyeyemi, Catherine Lacey, Yukiko Motoya, Rita Bullwinkel and Aimee Bender. The rest of our time together will be a workshop. As you have already done in your introductory fiction course, you will read your peers’ writing closely, offering sincere and engaged feedback in the form of both written responses and in-class discussion. You will also share your own writing with the class and get the chance to see your work from the perspective of a committed, generous, detail-oriented readership. Each student will workshop at least two stories over the course of the term, and will turn in a significant revision of one of those stories at the end of the semester.

English 3466: Special Topics in Intermediate Poetry Writing
Instructor:
 Margaret Brown
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing poetry. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.

English 3467S: Issues and Methods in Tutoring Writing
Instructor:
 Beverly Moss
This course trains students to be effective tutors in the OSU Writing Center or within the Writing Associates Program, which includes learning and applying strategies for working with writers of all levels and writing at all stages of completion and comprehension. Through observation-work, students will learn about the day-to-day activities of a University Writing Center, and how tutors conduct themselves during their sessions with clients. Additionally, we will discuss different strategies that will help tutors as they work with English Language Learners. Students will also be trained in face-to-face and online tutoring methods, as well as individual and group tutoring methods. Ultimately, this course should help students to feel more confident in their roles as writing consultants, and will shed insight into consulting strategies. This course is discussion-based and aims to engage students' areas of interest and expertise to the formal study of writing, literacy and writing centers. This course will offer training in research methods and data analysis and will use the Writing Center as a research space, with a hands-on practical learning component that includes observation, supervised tutoring and ultimately concludes with employment opportunities at the OSU Writing Center or within the Writing Associates Program.

English 3468: Special Topics in Intermediate Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor:
 Josie Kochendorfer
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing creative nonfiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.

English 3662: An Introduction to Literary Publishing
Instructor:
 Robert Schumaker
An introduction to the theory and practice of editing and publishing literature.


4000-level

 

English 4150: Cultures of Professional Writing
Instructors:
 Christiane Buuck
Examine writing in various workplaces. Analyze writing discourse that shapes professional organizations. Explore ongoing technological and cultural shifts required of workplace writers and the role of digital media.

English 4150: Cultures of Professional Writing
Instructors:
 Jennifer Patton
Examine writing in various workplaces. Analyze writing discourse that shapes professional organizations. Explore ongoing technological and cultural shifts required of workplace writers and the role of digital media.

English 4150: Cultures of Professional Writing
Instructors:
 Staff
Examine writing in various workplaces. Analyze writing discourse that shapes professional organizations. Explore ongoing technological and cultural shifts required of workplace writers and the role of digital media.

English 4189: Professional Writing Minor — Capstone Internship
Instructor:
 Jennifer Patton
Students work on-site in an organization doing writing-related work and meet weekly to discuss related topics.

English 4189: Professional Writing Minor — Capstone Internship
Instructor:
 Staff
Students work on-site in an organization doing writing-related work and meet weekly to discuss related topics.

English 4520.01: Shakespeare
Instructor:
 Luke Wilson
Critical examination of the works, life, theater and contexts of Shakespeare.

English 4520.01: Shakespeare
Instructor:
 Alan Farmer
This course will explore the formal, social and political engagements of Shakespeare's plays. It will pay particular attention to how his plays conform to and work against the genres of comedy, tragedy, history, and romance, and to how they represent such issues as gender, sexuality, religion, race and political power. In addition to some critical and historical essays on the early modern theater and culture, we will likely read some combination of the following plays: Richard IIIA Midsummer Night's DreamMuch Ado About NothingMeasure for MeasureRomeo and JulietOthelloKing LearThe Winter's Tale and Pericles. Requirements include two essays, a midterm exam, a final exam, regular attendance and active participation.
I will order a selection of modern editions of the plays on the syllabus. Any modern edition you purchase must have line numbers, glosses of difficult words, and longer explanatory notes. Good editions of single plays are published by Cambridge, Oxford and Arden, as well as by Folger, Pelican, Norton, Bedford, Bantam and Signet. Reputable one-volume editions of all of Shakespeare's plays are published by Longman, Pelican, Riverside, Norton and Oxford.

English 4523: Special Topics in Renaissance Literature and Culture
Instructor:
 Chris Highley
Following the breakdown of political consensus and the growth of religious unrest, seventeenth-century England eventually descended into a civil war that split the nation and pitted King Charles I against many of his subjects. In 1649, the defeated king was executed, opening the way for England's only experiment with republican government. This class explores 17th century literature in the context of these tumultuous political and religious events. We will read texts by monarchs and defenders of monarchy and religious hierarchy alongside radical attacks on bishops and kings by the likes of John Milton and Oliver Cromwell. We will also study: the verse written amid civil strife by Robert Herrick and Andrew Marvell; one of the last plays to be staged before the closing of the public playhouses in 1642; a fantastic court masque; and the extraordinary tracts in which both men and women preached political and religious transformation. The course will conclude with John Milton's reflections in Paradise Lost on the defeat of the republican's “Good Old Cause” and the restoration of the king.

English 4535: Special Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth Century British Literature and Culture—Literature of Slavery and Freedom during the Enlightenment
Instructor:
 Roxann Wheeler
This course will feature the ways that slavery and colonization shaped English literature, particularly the novel, 1660-1800. We will explore the literature of captivity and enslavement of Britons, native Americans and Africans, as well as study the radical claim that English wives were like slaves. We will pay particular attention to the fictional impersonation of non-English characters who were critical of Britons in literature written by Britons. A cultural study of literature, we will study theories of race, racism and slavery in Britain and the Caribbean. Likely texts:

  • Aphra Behn, Oroonoko; or The Royal Slave (1688)
  • Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe (1719)
  • Jonathan Swift, Gulliver's Travels (1726)
  • The Inkle and Yarico stories in poetry, fiction, and comic opera
  • Anonymous, The Female Americanor the Memoirs of Unca Eliza Winkfield (1767)
  • Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, The African(1789)
  • Mary Wollstonecraft, Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792)
  • Anonymous, The Woman of Colour (1808)

English 4540: Nineteenth-Century British Poetry
Instructor:
 Jill Galvan
This course covers British poetry written in the nineteenth century, encompassing the Romantic and Victorian periods.  I’ll begin with some brief discussions of poetic elements and critical reading strategies, for those new to in-depth poetry analysis (or needing a refresher). **You do not need to consider yourself fantastic at analyzing poetry to take this course! Part of my goal will be to help everyone become more confident approaching the genre by the end. Authors will range from Charlotte Smith and William Wordsworth to Augusta Webster and Oscar Wilde. We will focus on formal and thematic concerns; at the same time, we will consider important cultural/historical contexts—for example, the French Revolution, abolitionism, ideas of the sublime, the “woman question” and gender debates, momentous scientific discoveries, challenges to religious faith and burgeoning modern views of art. We will also discuss important literary modes and movements (including the Gothic, the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and Aestheticism). I will be lecturing but will also incorporate lots of discussion. Tentative course requirements: regular and enthusiastic class participation, four brief analytical responses (1-2 pp. each), one longer critical essay (5-7 pp.), a midterm exam and a final exam.

English 4551: Special Topics in 19th-Century U.S. Literature — Writing for Freedom: Literature, Reform and Activism in the Nineteenth Century
Instructor: 
Andrea Williams
Throughout the nineteenth century - as in the present - activists used the written and spoken word to rally for a number of causes: women's rights, racial equality, environmentalism, child welfare, animal rights and prison reform. This class examines how reformers shape storylines, ideals and character types (such as orphaned or innocent children) to appeal to supportive and resistant audiences. While focused on nineteenth-century literature and contexts, the course invites students to compare how early models of protest relate to contemporary social justice movements.

English 4559: Introduction to Narrative and Narrative Theory
Instructor:
 Amy Shuman
"Narrative" is a current buzz-word and a catch-all term; everything is narrative nowadays!  However, it is also one of the principle means of organizing experience in everyday life and conversation, popular culture and literary works. This course introduces students to the basic concepts and tools of "classical" narrative theory and analysis, in four general areas: the underlying structure of story; the reordering of story-events in the plot; the production of a story-world (narrative time and space); and the representation of selves (narrators, speakers, perceivers, minds). We will study a selection of classic essays in narrative theory, and we will read and analyze a variety of mainly literary narrative- fairy-tales, short-stories, novels, one graphic narrative and at least one film. We will also survey some of the developments in "post-classical" narrative theory, including rhetorical narrative theory, feminist and queer narratology and cognitive narrative theory.

English 4563: Contemporary Literature
Instructor:
 Jessica Prinz
We will read broadly in the area of twentieth- and twenty-first-century fiction, focusing on the theme of science. Although science fiction is a genre devoted to science and its fusion with literature, we will  be looking at other genres as well, as we explore some of the central concerns and themes of the period (1945 to the present).  Among works that may be considered: Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49; Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go; Egan, A Visit from the Goon Squad; Calvino, If on a Winter's Night a Traveler; Eggers, The Circle. Some writing and exams will be required.

English 4564.02: Major Author in 18th- and 19th- Century British Literature — Lord Byron and His Circle
Instructor:
 Jacob Risinger
Lord Byron - the best-selling poet of his age - single-handedly upended the taste, expectations and literary conventions of nineteenth-century Britain. Once described as "mad, bad and dangerous to know," the scandals that followed in his wake shaped his poetry and his ironic perspective on life, love, politics and art.  By any standard, his life was ridiculously eventful: he published his first book of poetry at age seventeen but subsequently recalled and burned every copy. Two years of travel in the Mediterranean exposed Byron to the shifting dynamics of British imperial culture - but also gave him the freedom to explore his emergent sexuality. On his return to England, the publication of Childe Harold's Pilgrimage made him famous overnight. After the very public scandal of a failed marriage, Byron left England in 1816 - never to return. Exiled in Europe, he helped introduce vampires to the English-speaking world, and his famous ghost story challenge led Mary Shelley to write Frankenstein. Byron spent the next eight years in Italy, working away on his unfinished satirical masterpiece, Don Juan. Hilarious and scathing in equal parts, it led Percy Shelley to claim, "Nothing has ever been written like it in English." At age 36, Byron died while fighting in the Greek War of Independence. Over the course of the semester, we will explore "Byromania" as it emerges in Byron's major works, shorter lyrics, and "metaphysical dramas."  We will also take stock of major work by Byron's close contemporaries, including Percy Shelley, Mary Shelley and John Polidori. Our readings and discussions will lead to important questions about the nature and status of celebrity, irony, sexuality, poetry, authorship and empire in nineteenth-century Britain. We will also touch on Byron's various afterlives - in literature, in music and in film.

English 4564.04: Major Author in 20th- Century British Literature — Virginia Woolf & the Bloomsbury Group
Instructor:
 Thomas Davis
The course will focus on Virginia Woolf's major novels alongside the writings of other major figures in the Bloomsbury Group. Alongside major novels by Woolf (Jacob's RoomMrs. DallowayTo the Lighthouse, and The Years among others), we'll read fiction by E.M. Forster and Leonard Woolf, art criticism by Clive Bell and Roger Fry, treatises by J.M. Keynes and Leonard Woolf, and many of Woolf's essays.
We will pay close attention to the way the Bloomsbury Group's aesthetic innovations relate to the eruption of two world wars, shifts in gender and sexuality, the slow wane of the British empire, changing notions of nature and the natural world and the various political projects (the League of Nations, feminist ideas of the state, working class politics) that drew the interest of Woolf and her cohort. We will also consider the contemporary afterlives of Woolf by reading a 21st century novel by either Zadie Smith or Ali Smith.

English 4565: Advanced Fiction Writing
Instructor:
 Nick White
This is the advanced creative writing workshop in fiction. Admission is limited to creative writing concentrators who have taken English 2265, and to other students who have successfully completed English 2265 with permission of the instructor by portfolio submission.

English 4566: Advanced Poetry Writing
Instructor:
 Marcus Jackson
Each meeting, we will workshop your poems. In addition, we will be reading and discussing the aesthetic choices made in selections of published poetry (distributed via handouts and our Carmen page). Also, we will make efforts to become familiar with the poets and books that are guiding our current writing, thereby giving us more informed perspectives from which to critique weekly drafts.

English 4568: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor: 
Lee Martin
This is an advanced workshop that will focus on the production and analysis of the students’ creative nonfiction. We will examine the artistic choices writers make with forms such as memoir, the personal essay, nature writing, literary journalism, etc. Our focus will be on the exploration of a subject from the multi-layered perspective of the writer. Our primary focus will be the reading and discussion of student-written work. Each student will present two pieces of creative nonfiction for workshop discussion. At the end of the quarter, each student will turn in a significantly revised version of one of these pieces. Students will also prepare analytical letters of response to their classmates’ work.

English 4569: Digital Media in English Studies: Digital Protest and Online Activism
Instructor: 
John Jones
Have you ever wondered what your voice-activated speakers are saying about you after you’ve left the room? Did you know that your Fitbit was a published author? In this course, students will explore how digital culture enables physical objects to argue, both in the production of new genres of written text and in their interactions with people and the environment. We will explore the rhetorical possibilities of emerging interfaces such as voice control, paying particular attention to the new forms of digital creativity they are enabling as well as to how the data they produce are impacting privacy and security. In order to do so, we will not only analyze these objects but become makers ourselves, using tinkering as a way of thinking about new relations between people and the physical world that are enabled by our devices and the new forms of writing these relations can support. 

English 4573.01: Rhetorical Theory and Criticism
Instructor:
 James Fredal
It has always been a basic premise of rhetoric that all texts have an impact on their audience. That impact can be intellectual, emotional, aesthetic, attitudinal, relational, ethical and sometimes even physical. HOW texts work, how producers achieve the effects they want and why audiences respond to texts in the way they do: these are the  basic questions of rhetorical theory and analysis. English 4573.01 will be an introduction to rhetorical criticism and analysis, and to the broad range of terms of concepts from a long history of rhetorical theory that are relevant and useful to rhetorical criticism. That is to say, we will learn how to read and analyze texts at a more sophisticated level to understand how they work. In addition to reading and talking about a broad range of rhetorical techniques, we will look at a wide range of texts, from speeches and cartoons to Twitter feeds and Reddit threads, Youtube channels and Instagram accounts.  Students will write frequent short analysis papers, a few longer issue papers and a final project.

English 4575: Special Topics in Literary Forms and Themes
Instructors:
 Angus Fletcher
In this course, you will learn to write like your favorite author, in any genre or any medium, from poetry to comics, film to fiction, essays to television, memoir to mashup, ancient or modern. You will start by learning the secret to uncovering your favorite author's creative blueprint, identifying the formal elements that your author uses like nobody else. Maybe the element is a unique style, or a special recipe for character, or an innovative use of plot, or storyworld, or voice, or atmosphere. Then you'll incorporate that blueprint into your own writing. So you will create your own original piece of writing that sounds just like your favorite author--while also sounding just like you.

English 4578: Special Topics in Film
Instructors:
 Sandra MacPherson
Examination of particular topics, themes, genres, or movements in cinema; topics may include particular directors (Orson Welles), periods (The Sixties), genres (horror).

English 4578: Special Topics in Film — Film and American Society After World War II
Instructors:
 Ryan Friedman
This course examines the history of the American cinema in the years immediately following the Second World War, covering the period from 1945 to 1960. We will view and discuss significant Hollywood films from a variety of genres (e.g., comedy, musical, film noir, western, melodrama, social problem film), contextualizing them by reading articles and excerpts published in a variety of venues (e.g., popular magazines, film-trade publications, books of sociology and psychology) during the era in which these films were produced and exhibited. These textual primary sources will serve to illustrate historical discourses describing, reinforcing and/or critiquing what were conceived of as significant social issues and shifts - from the "veterans problem," to the "housing crisis," to "juvenile delinquency," to sexism and residential segregation. In our discussions, we will be interested in how the assigned films reflected, responded to and inflected the print debates happening around these issues and shifts - even and perhaps especially when the films are not overtly working in the "social problem" genre. We will also approach the films in the context of the upheavals happening in the American film industry during this period, as a result of the Paramount decree, the HUAC hearings, suburbanization and declining movie theater attendance. In particular, we will examine the ways in which the rise of television as a competing medium of mass entertainment shaped the stories that Hollywood movies told and the visual devices they used to dramatize these stories.

English 4581: Special Topics in U.S. Ethnic Literatures
Instructor:
 Martin Ponce
This course examines 20th and 21st-century U.S. ethnic literatures - particularly, experimental or innovative literatures - through the frames of U.S. empire, racialization and sexuality. In what ways did the practices of U.S. imperialism - including chattel slavery, westward expansion, overseas war and colonization, economic and cultural neocolonialism - produce racialized, colonized and gendered-sexual subjects? How have African American, American Indian, Arab American, Asian American and Latinx writers critically and creatively engaged with such practices of racial and sexual subordination and territorial domination? What sorts of literary experiments have they invented and used to claim cultures and communities of survival, renewal and transformation?

English 4582: Special Topics in African American Literature — Gender, Sexuality and Citizenship
Instructor:
 Koritha Mitchell
When a politician wants to be taken seriously, he immediately trots out a wife and kids. Why do Americans insist that heterosexuality yields morality and stability? Why doesn't heterosexuality work that magic for black people? This course will explore these questions through mostly canonical works of African American literature. Likely authors include Harriet Jacobs, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, James Baldwin and Toni Morrison. Engaged class participation absolutely required. Expect frequent pop quizzes.

English 4586: Studies in American Indian Literature and Culture
Instructor:
 Elissa Washuta
Focused study of a topic in American Indian literary and cultural studies.

English 4590.04H: Romanticism
Instructor:
 Clare Simmons
The loose theme for this Honors Seminar on British literature of the Romantic period (roughly from the time of the French Revolution to the Victorian period) will be "Romanticism and the Visual." We will consider Romantic-era aesthetic theory (such as the role of imagination, the sublime and the picturesque) and the importance of the contemplation of the natural world. In combination with literary works, we will also view examples of Romantic visual art such as painting and architecture. Readings will include poetry by William Blake, William and Dorothy Wordsworth, S.T. Coleridge, P.B. Shelley, John Keats, Mary Robinson, Felicia Hemans and Robert Burns; non-fiction prose by Edmund Burke, William Gilpin, Mary Wollstonecraft and Thomas De Quincey; and the novels Frankenstein(Mary Shelley), The Bride of Lammermoor (Sir Walter Scott) and Northanger Abbey (Jane Austen). Course Requirements: Regular attendance and participation; oral presentation; reading questions; short essay; final research paper project.

English 4590.08H: U.S. and Colonial Literature — Popular Literature and New Media
Instructor:
 Jared Gardner
This course will explore the development of popular culture across media in the American 19th century, looking at novels, newspapers, story papers, illustrated magazines, dime novels and more, up to the rise of film and comics at century’s end. We will study the technological and cultural changes in print and other forms of communication and expression that shaped new possibilities during this period, and we will explore archives online and in special collections on campus to make new discoveries in the still largely untold story of the birth of a modern American popular culture.

English 4592: Special Topics in Women in Literature and Culture—Sonnets
Instructor: Jennifer Higginbotham
Women played an influential role in the development of the sonnet. When the Italian poet Petrarch invented the form in the fourteenth century, he started a literary vogue that continues today, and women have been at the forefront of its innovation in the English tradition almost from the start. Initially present only as love objects, women quickly adapted the form to their own poetic voices. The Protestant exile Anne Lock published the first original sonnet sequence in English in 1560, re-purposing the secular love lyric to express religious desire, while women like Elizabeth Carey, Lady Spencer participated in the translation of Petrarch's original Canzoniere in the 1590s. After we dive into the mechanics of what makes a sonnet "a sonnet," we'll apply our knowledge to trace the history of women's sonnets from the sixteenth century to today. Poets may include Lock, Carey, Mary Wroth, Charlotte Smith, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Christina Rossetti, Emma Lazarus, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Gwendolyn Brooks, Marilyn Hacker, Marilyn Nelson, Patience Agbabi, Wendy Cope and Jackie Kay. In addition to gaining mastery of poetic form, students will engage with feminist and queer theory to explore what sonnets help us understand about gender and sexuality, and what gender and sexuality can help us understand about sonnets.

English 4592: Special Topics in Women in Literature and Culture — Gender and Empire
Instructor:
 Molly Farrell
The colonization of the New World has usually been told as a "boy story," with pirates or explorers, shipwrecks or frontiers, as its characters and settings. This class asks what would happen if we put girls and women, homes and domestic spaces, at the center of that story instead. Reading literature from and about early America, we will look at the ways sex, gender and families are inextricably bound up with appetites for expanding an Empire. Beginning by asking why Toni Morrison set her new novel A Mercy among women in colonial America, we will read a novel about Americans caught in the Haitian revolution written by Aaron Burr's secret lover; ask why the first best-selling American novel, The Coquette, was about a sex scandal; and examine the persistent problems of gender and marriage in the work of Nathaniel Hawthorne.

English 4595: Literature and Law
Instructor:
 Susan Williams
This course will consider how literary texts are controlled by, represent and respond to legal issues and decisions. Our main focus will be historical, but we will also examine how historical contexts inform current debates about sex offender registries; sampling and copyright in Hip-Hop; and economic justice and wealth management, among others. Primary texts will include writings by Louisa May Alcott, Charles Chesnutt, Emily Dickinson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe and Mark Twain. Topics will include copyright and literary production; sentencing laws, incarceration, and the "civil dead"; and family law and inheritance.


5000-level

 

English 5191: Internship in English Studies
Instructor:
 Katherine Stanutz
Students may receive credit for internships across a wide variety of career fields including, but not limited to, the arts and nonprofit administration; creative, business, and technical writing; communications, marketing and public relations; consulting; education; human resources; law and politics; media production; publishing; sales; social services and counseling; and technology services.
*Advanced undergraduate students are encouraged to enroll in 5000-level courses.*

English 5710.01/.02: Introduction to Old English Language and Literature — The Language of Beowulf
Instructor: Leslie Lockett
This course teaches students to read and declaim Old English, the spoken language of the English people in the early Middle Ages (up to ca. 1150), and the original language of evocative poems including Beowulf and The Wanderer. In the first half of the semester, we will learn declensions, conjugations and vocabulary; in the second half, we will translate works of Old English prose and poetry. Students are graded on their preparation for each class meeting, eight quizzes, three written translation assignments and a final exam. No prior knowledge of Old English or other languages is required.
*Advanced undergraduate students are encouraged to enroll in 5000-level courses.*

Text

1000-level

 

English 1109: Intensive Writing and Reading
Instructor: 
Christiane Buuck
Provides intensive practice in integrating academic reading and writing.

English 1110.01 (60): First-Year English Composition — Media Around the World
Instructor:
 Michael Grifka
What’s the difference between how a country is viewed by others, and how it views itself? Is there such a thing as a national culture? In this course, we will explore media from all over the world, using it to understand how culture is expressed through film, literature, comics, and more. Students will have the opportunity to focus on a country of their choice, and conduct research on that country’s media landscape, as over the course of the semester we build our understandings of how media represents, and even changes, the way a place’s culture is viewed. Students will write analytical and research papers responding to the diverse media available in the world today. Each student will also share their research with their classmates on a regular basis, so that each person gains a familiarity with a number of different places and cultures. Together, we will investigate the questions: how do creators try to address their own cultures differently than other peoples? How can you tell what a place is really like? And how can we avoid stereotypes, bias, and racism when consuming media?
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01 (80, 170, 280, 480): First-Year English Composition
Instructor: 
Cathy Ryan
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers.
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01 (190, 370, 470): First-Year English Composition
Instructor: 
Sonya Parrish
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers.
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01 (270): First-Year English Composition
Instructor: 
Gavin Johnson
In this section of first year writing, we will explore the intersections of digital literacy and activism. As technology continues to redefine our lives, cultures and politics, how might we, as writers, use technology to better advocate for ourselves and our communities?
This course is part of the Digital Flagship. iPad section.
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01: First-Year English Composition
Instructor:
 Staff
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers.
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01H: Honors First-Year English Composition
Instructor:
 Staff
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.02 (60): First-Year English Composition
Instructor:
 Francis Donoghue
This is a regular section of 1110 with a built-in theme. Students will cover the usual terrain of English grammar and usage, if in an unorthodox way, using Geraldine Woods’ English Grammar for Dummies (3rd edition). Students will do exercises based on the topics she covers (these will not be graded). Students will then proceed to read a series of short stories, concentrating on analyzing the content of the stories and also on the writing process. Students will expand the degree of difficulty in the second half of the course, when we analyze three novels. We’ll begin the course with a series of warm-up ethnographic exercises. Ethnography will be explained before we get started. Three graded papers.
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.02: First-Year English Composition
Instructor:
 Staff
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers. Taught with an emphasis on literary texts.
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.03 (20): First-Year English Composition — Meanings Behind Movie Posters
Instructor: 
Christiane Buuck
Intensive practice in fundamentals of expository writing illustrated in the student's own writing and essays of professional writers; offered in a small class setting and linked with an individual tutoring component in its concurrent course, ENGLISH-1193. This course is available for EM credit only through the AP program.
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.03 (10, 30): First-Year English Composition — Belief and the Supernatural
Instructor:
 Martha Sims
Intensive practice in fundamentals of expository writing illustrated in the student's own writing and essays of professional writers; offered in a small class setting and linked with an individual tutoring component in its concurrent course, ENGLISH-1193. This course is available for EM credit only through the AP program.
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1193: Individual Studies
Instructor:
 Martha Sims        
Intensive practice in the fundamentals of expository writing.


2000-level

 

English 2202: Selected Works of British Literature — 1800 to Present
Instructor:
 Jill Galvan and Staff
This course will introduce students to some of the major British texts, authors, and literary forms and trends of the last two centuries. In the process, you will be learning about diverse perspectives on important cultural developments over the past two centuries, including the French Revolution, the abolition of slavery, the Industrial Revolution, imperialism, debates over gender roles and sexuality, the rise of scientific values, the twentieth-century world wars, and the political and cultural consequences of decolonization. We will study major literary modes such as the Romantic lyric, the Gothic novel, the dramatic monologue, World War I poetry, postcolonial narrative, and the Bildungsroman (or “coming-of-age novel”). Our fiction and drama will include Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol, Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest, and Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go. English 2202 will also familiarize students with college-level strategies for analyzing literature. Main course requirements include two exams and two short papers designed to build your skills in literary interpretation.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2220: Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructor:
 Staff
Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2220H: Introduction to Shakespeare — Genre, Gender and Kingship
Instructor:
 Luke Wilson
Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2260 (10): Introduction to Poetry
Instructor:
 Staff
Designed to help students understand and appreciate poetry through an intensive study of a representative group of poems.
GE: Literature

English 2260 (20): Introduction to Poetry
Instructor:
 Sebastian Knowles
Designed to help students understand and appreciate poetry through an intensive study of a representative group of poems.
GE: Literature

English 2260 (30): Introduction to Poetry
Instructor:
 Staff
Designed to help students understand and appreciate poetry through an intensive study of a representative group of poems.
GE: Literature

English 2260H: Introduction to Poetry
Instructor:
 David Brewer
This course will explore the pleasures and insights of poetry:  reading it, reciting it, listening to it and even writing a bit of it. Toward that end, students will examine a wide range of verse (most, but hardly all of it from the past century) and think about how it works, both on its own terms and on us. Above all, students will be investigating how understanding and enjoyment can reinforce one another, rather than work at cross purposes, at least when it comes to poetry. Likely assignments include a weekly reading journal, several short written exercises, a final project (which could take the form of writing your own verse) and active participation in discussions.
GE: Literature

English 2261 (10): Introduction to Fiction
Instructor:
 Sandra MacPherson
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.
GE: Literature

English 2261 (70): Introduction to Fiction
Instructor:
 Francis Donoghue
This course will introduce students to the systematic study of fiction. Everyone is familiar with the genre, but we will take the approach that studying it in an organized way at the college level is new to most students. We will examine a mix of short stories and novels, and will ask both formal and historical questions. We will spend the bulk of our time analyzing plots and characters, but always keeping bigger questions in mind: what is each author’s outlook on human behavior and society? How does each author represent that outlook in prose? Because we’re progressing chronologically, beginning with texts written in the nineteenth-century and proceeding to texts written in the twenty-first century, students will, by the end of the course, have developed a clear sense of how fiction has changed over the last century and a half. A final goal of the course will be to help students develop the critical thinking skills necessary to analyze fiction both in conversation and in writing. This is almost entirely a matter of practice, of gradually mastering a vocabulary long used in literary studies for talking and writing about literature. My hope is that this course will enrich your reading experiences long after it’s over.
GE: Literature

English 2261 (40): Introduction to Fiction
Instructor:
 Koritha Mitchell
This introduction to fiction course will focus on authors from the United States who have a variety of backgrounds. That is, not every author studied will be white.
GE: Literature

English 2261: Introduction to Fiction
Instructor:
 Staff
Examination of the elements of fiction — plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc. — and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.
GE: Literature

English 2263: Introduction to Film
Instructor:
 Frederick Luis Aldama
This course will offer methods and approaches for understanding the devices used (mise-en-scène, lensing, sound, editing, casting and so on) by film directors to give shape to their various distillations and reconstructions of the building blocks of reality. We will also explore the sociopolitical contexts of making and distributing film. And, we will be attuned to how films trigger our perception, thought and feeling systems when consuming films. To this end, we will explore how a film director gives shape through visual and auditory means to a filmic blueprint that triggers real emotions and thoughts about the world—all while we the audience know it to be a distillation and reconstruction of the real world. Films we will likely study include: Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now (1979) Alfonso Cuarón’s Y tu mama también (2001) Alfonso Cuarón’s Children of Men (2006) Cary Joji Fukunaga’s Sin Nombre (2009) González Iñarítu’s Amores Perros (2000) Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing (1989) Terence Malick’s Badlands (1973) Mira Nair's Salaam Bombay! (1988) Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight (2008) Robert Rodriguez’s Sin City (2005) M. Night Shyamalan's Unbreakable (2000) Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction (1994) Guillermo del Toro’s Pan’s Labyrinth (2006) and Barry Jenkins’ Moonlight (2016).
GE: VPA

English 2264: Introduction to Popular Culture Studies
Instructor:
 Staff
Introduction to the analysis of popular culture texts.
GE: Cultures & Ideas.
*This is a combined section class. Cross-listed in CompStd.

English 2265 (10): Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructor: 
Alaina Belisle
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.

English 2265 (30): Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructor: 
Christopher Rinaldo Santantasio
Flash fiction is a work of extreme brevity that hints at a broader narrative. Students will read, discuss and construct a series of very short works of prose employing compression, imagery and carefully chosen details.

English 2265 (40): Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructor: 
Emily Greenberg
In this beginner-level workshop, students will explore the craft of writing fiction by discussing the work of published authors, providing feedback on the work of classmates, and composing and refining their own short stories. In the first part of the course, students will become familiar with the fundamentals of storytelling by analyzing short stories by masters of literary and popular fiction, including George Saunders, A.M. Homes, Carmen Maria Machado, Stephanie Vaughn, Tobias Wolff, Denis Johnson and many more. Students will examine how authors shape storytelling elements to create desired effects in their readers, and will consider how these strategies may be used in their own writing. In the second part of the course, students will begin working on their own short pieces, which will be workshopped in class as a group. At the end of the course, students will turn in a revised short story, as well as an artist statement describing their  goals as a writer. The aim of this workshop is to cultivate a supportive community of writers invested in helping their classmates develop their craft and achieve their aesthetic goals.

English 2265 (20): Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructor: 
Molly Rideout
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.

English 2266: Introductory Poetry Writing
Instructors:
 Margaret Brown
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, composition and prosody; practice in the writing of poetry; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published poems by established poets. Prereq: 1110. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.

English 2267: Introduction to Creative Writing
Instructor: 
Julie Garbuz
An introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction. Analysis and discussion of student work, with reference to the general methods and scope of all three genres.

English 2268 (10): Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor:
 Jacob Scheier-Schwartz
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of creative nonfiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published essays by masters of the many forms of creative nonfiction.

English 2268 (20): Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor:
 Amanda Ingram
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of creative nonfiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published essays by masters of the many forms of creative nonfiction.

English 2269: Digital Media Composing
Instructor:
 Staff
A composition course in which students analyze and compose digital media texts while studying complex forms and practices of textual production.
GE: VPA

English 2270: Introduction to Folklore
Instructor:
 Staff
Folklore theory and methods explored through engagement with primary sources: folktale, legend, jokes, folksong, festival, belief, art. Folklore Minor course.
GE: Cultures & Ideas
*This is a combined section class

English 2276: Arts of Persuasion
Instructor:
 Staff
Introduces students to the study and practice of rhetoric and how arguments are shaped by technology, media and cultural contexts.
GE: Cultures & Ideas

English 2277: Introduction to Disability Studies
Instructor:
 Sona Hill
This course investigates the ways that disability is composed in contemporary life. We’ll think about disabled people in terms of identity and culture, but we’ll also think about the way disability itself functions to shape our ideas about ourselves, and others. What does it mean when you taste food and say, “That’s crazy good”? What does it mean when you break your ankle and spend a few months using crutches?  Our purpose is not to say, “This way of speaking or behaving is good, and that other way of speaking or behaving is bad.” Rather, our purpose is to ask, over and over again: How does disability make meaning in contemporary life?  We will explore various models of disability, paying attention to the ways that each model intersects with race, gender, class and sexuality. We’ll theorize concepts such as normal, passing, inspiration and access, and consider how these concepts both emerge and are contested through individual authors’ and artists’ composing practices.
GE: Cultures & Ideas

English 2280: The English Bible — The Bible as Literature
Instructor: 
Hannibal Hamlin
The Bible contains some of the weirdest and most wonderful literature you will ever read, and there is certainly no book that has had a greater influence on English and American literature from Beowulf to Paradise LostPilgrim’s Progress to The Chronicles of Narnia, Whitman’s Song of Myself to Morrison’s Song of Solomon. We will read a selection of biblical books in order to gain some appreciation of the Bible’s wide range of literary genres, forms, styles and topics. Our discussion will include the nature of biblical narrative and characterization, the function of prophecy and its relation to history, the peculiar nature of biblical poetry, so-called Wisdom literature, anomalous books like Job and The Song of Songs (including the historical process of canonization that made them “biblical” and the kinds of interpretation that have been used to make them less strange), the relationship between (in traditional Christian terms) the Old and New Testaments (including typology, the symbolic linking of characters, events, themes and images in the books before and after the Incarnation) and the unity (or lack thereof) of the Bible as a whole. As occasion warrants, we will also look at some of the diverse ways the Bible has been read and interpreted––the stranger the better––by poets and writers, artists and film-makers over the past millennia.

Do note: this is NOT a course in religion, but rather an English course on the Bible as a literary work. Any and all faiths, or none, are welcome, and none will be privileged. 

Text: The English Bible: King James Version (2 vols.), ed. Herbert Marks (1) and Gerald Hammond and Austin Busch (2), Norton Critical Edition
Course requirements: Evaluation will be based on active participation in class discussion and activities, regular reading quizzes, two short essays, a mid-term test, and a final exam.
GE: Literature

English 2281: Introduction to African-American Literature
Instructor: 
Staff
This course introduces students to the major periods and authors of the African American literary tradition from the colonial period to our contemporary moment. In this survey, we will read texts in a wide range of genres (poetry, autobiographies, novels, short stories, nonfiction essays) that engage with an equally broad array of topics and issues, including slavery and freedom, orality and literacy, music and literature, gender and sexuality, political protest and artistic innovation and the persistence of structural racism and racial violence into the present. We will examine literature from the period of chattel slavery in the Americas, through Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, the Harlem Renaissance, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Black Arts Movement, postmodernism and the contemporary.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
*This is a combined lecture class. Cross-listed in AfAmASt

English 2282: Introduction to Queer Studies — Queer & Trans Cultures and Movements
Instructors: 
Jian Chen
This seminar explores queer and transgender cultural strategies for movement building from their moments of emergence in the 1960s through their continual re-imagining in response to changing conditions and state and social efforts to target, police and assimilate lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people by the twenty-first century. As a derogatory term turned back against those using it, queer has been claimed as a perversely “negative” descriptive that rejects common-sense heterosexual (and sometimes gender) conventions, while creating different ways of desiring, relating and being in the world. The second half of the course will focus on the embodied struggles and cultural and political strategies of transgender communities. The course will engage with the histories and experiences of communities of color and the analysis of race, racism, colonization and empire as vital to understanding sexuality and gender in the U.S.
GE: Cultures & Ideas
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
*This is a combined section class. Cross-listed in WGSS.

English 2290: Colonial and U.S. Literature to 1865
Instructors:
 Molly Farrell, Staff
Where does American literature begin? Why do points of origin matter for national literatures? This class explores the shifting canon of early U.S. literature and the colonial literatures from which it emerged. We will read narratives of initial cross-cultural encounters; oral traditions and writings by Native Americans; documents circulated by political leaders; appeals resisting slavery and injustice; sermons, novels, short stories and essays; and some of the most affecting and generative poetry ever written, among other texts. Students will learn to recognize and analyze the distinctive genres of writing that developed across this historical period. In addition, students will gain a sophisticated understanding of the ways that early American studies connects us to powerful contemporary cultural questions. Assignments may consist of required readings, class attendance and participation, quizzes, short analytical papers and exams.

English 2367.01: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience
Instructor: 
Staff
Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

English 2367.02 (100): Literature in the U.S. Experience
Instructor: 
Pranav Jani
Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

English 2367.02 (110): Literature in the U.S. Experience
Instructor:
 Jessica Prinz
Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

English 2367.02: Literature in the U.S. Experience
Instructor: 
Staff
Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

English 2367.03: Documentary in the U.S. Experience
Instructor:
 Staff
An intermediate course that extends and refines skills in critical reading and expository writing through analysis of written texts, video and documentaries.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)

English 2367.05 (10): The U.S. Folk Experience
Instructor:
 Martha Sims
Concepts of American folklore and ethnography; folk groups, tradition, and fieldwork methodology; how these contribute to the development of critical reading, writing and thinking skills.
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)

English 2367.05: The U.S. Folk Experience
Instructor: 
Staff
Concepts of American folklore and ethnography; folk groups, tradition, and fieldwork methodology; how these contribute to the development of critical reading, writing and thinking skills.
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)

English 2367.06: Composing Disability in the US
Instructor:
 Staff
Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America.

English 2367.07S: Literacy Narratives of Black Columbus
Instructor:
 Staff
This service-learning course focuses on collecting and preserving literacy narratives of Columbus-area Black communities. Through engagement with community partners, students refine skills in research, analysis and composition; students synthesize information, create arguments about discursive/visual/cultural artifacts and reflect on the literacy and life-history narratives of Black Columbus.

English 2367.08: The US Experience: Writing About Video Games
Instructor: 
Carlos Kelly
In this course, we will play and think critically about video games through the lens of race and gender. We will consider issues of representation in games and also in films about/that include video game aesthetics. No gaming experience necessary!

English 2463: Introduction to Video Games Analysis
Instructor:
 Staff
An introduction to humanities-based methods of analyzing and interpreting video games in terms of form, genre, style and theory. No background in video game play is necessary. All students will have regular opportunities for hands-on experience with different game types and genres in both the computer-based classroom and the Department of English Video Game Lab.
GE: VPA


3000-level

 

English 3271 (20): Structure of the English Language
Instructor:
 Gabriella Modan
This course is an introduction to English linguistics. We will learn about the basic characteristics of language: the sounds of English and how they're put together, word formation processes, and rules for combining words into utterances/sentences.  While studying how the basic building blocks of language work, we will also investigate linguistic variation, accents of American English, and language and education.  Finally, we'll explore how standard and non-standard varieties of English get evaluated in the US, and the implications of such evaluations in educational settings.
GE: Cultures & Ideas

English 3271: Structure of the English Language
Instructor: 
Staff
Students learn basic characteristics of English linguistics focusing on the basic building blocks of language; the sounds of English and how they are put together, word formation processes and rules for combining words into utterances/sentences. Students investigate and explore linguistic variation, accents of American English and the implications of language evaluation in educational settings.
GE: Cultures & Ideas

English 3304 (10): Business and Professional Writing
Instructor: 
Christiane Buuck
The study of principles and practices of business and professional writing.

English 3304 (40): Business and Professional Writing
Instructor:
 Yanar Hashlamon
The study of principles and practices of business and professional writing.

English 3304: Business and Professional Writing
Instructor:
 Staff
The study of principles and practices of business and professional writing.

English 3305: Technical Writing
Instructor:
 Staff
Study of principles and practices of technical writing. Emphasis on the style, organization and conventions of technical and research reports, proposals, memoranda, professional correspondence, etc.

English 3364 (10): Special Topics in Popular Culture — Janeites: Austen Fiction, Films and Fans
Instructor: 
Robyn Warhol
Janeites: They have outfits. They re-enact Regency balls at annual conventions. They are Jane Austen fanatics. There are at least 62 film and TV adaptations of works by Austen, 28 of them made in the last decade. There’s fan fiction.  There are Jane Austen action figures and “Mrs. Darcy” t-shirts. And now there’s even an online role-play game, “Ever, Jane.” There are children’s versions of Austen novels. Jane Austen cookbooks.  Advice books and board games about “WWJD?” (“What would Jane do?”) And of course, lots of literary criticism. In this class we will be reading some criticism as well as four Austen novels and watching film adaptations including Clueless and the Bollywood-style Bride and Prejudice. We will look at the proliferation of all these contemporary avatars of Jane and more, to ask what it means, especially for women now. Assignments include short informal written responses to questions about the texts, group oral presentations, a midterm and a final.
GE: Cultures & Ideas

English 3364 (40): Special Topics in Popular Culture — Bad Words
Instructor: 
Lauren Squires
This class will explore "bad words" - swearing and other forms of language considered culturally "taboo." What counts as "bad" is not absolute, but is determined by social and cultural norms, situational expectations and individual preferences, habits and personalities. Indeed, some of the language considered offensive in American society even two decades ago is now considered utterly mundane - and vice versa. The goal of this class is to use taboo language as an inherently interesting lens through which to learn about human beings and the language they use. We will approach "bad words" from the viewpoint of multiple disciplines that concern themselves with the study of language, including linguistics, anthropology, psychology, literature, rhetoric and the law.
GE: Cultures & Ideas

English 3372 (10): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy
Instructor: 
Kristin Ferebee
What does it mean to be alive? Who gets to be considered alive, and under what conditions? What is the meaning of life? (Just kidding— we all know it’s 42.) The answers to these questions once seemed relatively simple. Now, however, as different sciences, religions, and ways of of life collide in our increasingly globalized world, we find ourselves confronted by complicated and perplexing questions about how we define and value different forms of life. Science fiction— once a genre considered “just for fun” or more “trivial” than real literature— has come to be an important zone where authors and readers grapple with these questions. In this course, we will read and view some of the ways in which science fiction has imagined alternative forms of life. Students will work with examples of film, TV, literature, and comics to explore their preconceptions about boundaries between the “natural” and the “unnatural,” the “human” and the “nonhuman,” the “dead” and the “alive.” Drawing on critical texts from the fields of queer theory, disability theory, and the environmental humanities, we will learn to explore science fiction’s challenges to our set modes of thinking, and understand how these challenges emerge from and relate to the pressing issues of bodily existence and environmental survival that are facing our world today. This course will fulfill GE requirements by asking students to examine and confront many different perspectives on what constitutes meaningful life, including feminist, queer, disability and non-Western perspectives. The material for the course will appeal to students who are interested in a wide range of science fiction literature and/or pop culture, as well as students who are interested in thinking about and discussing the major ethical issues of our age — particularly students who are studying within the medical or environmental sciences.

English 3372 (30): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy—Climate Fiction
Instructor:
 Thomas Davis
Climate Fiction: Climate Change Fiction, or "Cli-Fi," has become a cultural phenomenon in the past few years. The number of cli-fi novels and films has spiked and the New York Times, the Atlantic, ABC News and other outlets have asked how it might help us address the multiple problems of climate change. This course takes up a wide range of cli-fi to examine how writers imagine planetary futures. We will also consider the relationship between cli-fi and climate science. Possible authors: J.G. Ballard, Ursula K. Le Guin, Octavia Butler, Jenni Fagan, Alice Robinson, Nathaniel Rich, Steven Amsterdam, China Mieville and others.
GE: Literature

English 3372 (40): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy — Magic
Instructor:
 David Brewer
This course will investigate how magic works in fantasy. Students will consider the place of magic in the creation of fantastical worlds, how readers and viewers are encouraged to buy into those worlds and how the inclusion of magic has contributed to the cultural status of fantasy. Likely readings will include work by Rachel Aaron (The Spirit Thief), Susanna Clarke (Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell), Benedict Jacka (one of the Alex Varus novels), Ursula Le Guin (one of the Earthsea novels), J. K. Rowling (one of the Harry Potter novels), and Brandon Sanderson (one of the Mistborn novels). Students will also examine several films and television shows and consider what difference it makes to see and hear magic. Likely assignments will include a weekly journal, a few short written exercises, an online presentation, a final project in which you sketch out your own magical world and active participation in our discussions.
GE: Literature

English 3378: Special Topics in Film and Literature — Monsters Without and Within
Instructor: 
Karen Winstead
Storytellers have long used monsters not only to frighten us but also to jolt us into thinking more deeply about ourselves and our world. No film can be totally faithful to a written source; filmmakers perforce use different methods than do writers to tell their stories, to thrill and provoke. However, this course focuses on films that aggressively transform their literary sources, reinterpreting characters and retooling plots to create monsters that offer different visions of what we have to fear and of how we can (or cannot) overcome the monsters without and within. We will move from dragons and humanoids to vampires, zombies, ghosts, and psychopaths.  Our sampling of classics old and new will include Frankenstein, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Dracula, I Am Legend, and The Shining.  Requirements will include weekly online quizzes, a couple short papers, and a final exam.
GE: Cultures & Ideas

English 3379 (10): Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy
Instructor:
 Kay Halasek
As an introduction to the interrelated fields of Writing, Rhetoric, and Literacy, this course familiarizes students with key concepts and research and scholarly methods that underlie work in these interrelated fields, including rhetorical analysis, qualitative studies, and historical and archival research. Together, these fields examine and analyze phenomena, texts, and other artifacts in educational contexts, popular culture, and social and political movements. By the end of this course, students should be able to (1) demonstrate an understanding of and ability to employ the research and scholarly methods applicable in the fields of writing, rhetoric and literacy, (2) research, evaluate, and apply rhetorical principles in analyzing and interpreting phenomena, texts, and other artifacts; (3) demonstrate an understanding of and an ability to apply the central concepts informing writing and literacy studies; and (4) carry out course projects based on the research and scholarly methods in these related fields.

English 3379 (20): Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy
Instructor:
 James Fredal
Introduction to the interrelated fields of Writing, Rhetoric, and Literacy, familiarizing students with key concepts that underlie work in these interrelated fields and to the scholarly methods of WRL. Together, this discipline studies the ways people use language and other symbols to convey messages, persuade audiences, and create meaning, and how these practices are learned and taught.

English 3398 (30): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor: 
Jacob Risinger
This course's purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing.

English 3398: Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor: 
Sarah Neville
This class is designed to support students in developing the skills they need to be successful English majors. Classes and short assignments will cover issues like: What does secondary criticism add to literature? How do I read actively? What kinds of tools do I need? How do I stake a claim? Do I need a flag? What’s the difference between a long paper and a short one? How can I distinguish between what they say about a text and what I say? In addition, over the course of the term students will learn the types, tools, and methods of literary criticism that English scholars employ as they construct projects in both print and digital media. Along the way we’ll read a novel by Robertson Davies, short stories by Dorothy Parker, Lorrie Moore, Donald Barthelme, and George Saunders, a play by Djanet Sears, and poems by Billy-Ray Belcourt. Students will complete in-class exercises and multiple short writing assignments that ultimately build towards a longer research paper.

English 3398 (20): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
 Jennifer Higginbotham
This course's purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of creative writing.

English 3398: Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
 James Fredal
This course's purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of creative writing.

English 3398 (60): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor: 
Andrea Williams
This course's purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing.

English 3398 (70): Methods for the Study of Literature — In-Between Texts
Instructor:
 Sebastian Knowles
Literature often celebrates the space between worlds, whether an immigrant coming to a new land, a soldier navigating no-man's land, a woman negotiating the barriers of gender and class.  We will read W. G. Sebald's The Emigrants, Virginia Woolf's Orlando, William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying, Manuel Puig's The Kiss of the Spiderwoman, Ian McEwan's Nutshell, and T. S. Eliot's Four Quartets, and see if they have anything in common.

English 3405: Special Topics in Professional Communication — Organizational Writing for the Web
Instructor:
 Dan Seward
When people think about writing for the web, social media immediately comes to mind. However, a substantial portion of web-based writing appears on organizational websites. These sites represent a wide range of organizations, from community non-profits to large corporations, from government agencies to local start-ups. And these sites serve many purposes: promoting events, fostering communal interaction, hosting public resources, facilitating services and, most importantly, representing the organizations themselves. In this class, we will examine the online face of modern organizations, first, by writing professional reports analyzing and assessing a range of organizational sites and then, by developing our own organizational sites using free and commonly available site creation tools.

No experience with website development or visual design is necessary—both will be taught as core outcomes of the course, along with the fundamentals of accessibility, interactivity and collaborative composition. Regardless class members’ backgrounds and interests, they will have opportunities to expand their repertoire of professional genres while also refining their abilities to produce engaging and substantive verbal and visual texts. All students will complete the class with multiple contributions for their writing portfolios, including a professional report analyzing an active website, a website redesign proposal and, depending upon students’ own professional (or civic) aims and interests, a variety of web-ready pieces reflecting the communication needs (instructional, promotional, technical, communal, representational, etc.) of organizations falling within students’ desired career paths or civic spheres.

English 3465 (10): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing
Instructor:
 Kirsten Edwards
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing fiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.

English 3465 (20): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing
Instructor:
 Elizabeth Coulter Blackford
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing fiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.

English 3465 (30): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing
Instructor:
 Neil Grayson
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing fiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.

English 3466: Special Topics in Intermediate Poetry Writing
Instructor:
 Emmalee Hagarman
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing poetry. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.

English 3467S: Issues and Methods in Tutoring Writing
Instructor:
 Genie Giaimo
This course trains students to be effective tutors in the OSU Writing Center or within the Writing Associates Program, which includes learning and applying strategies for working with writers of all levels and writing at all stages of completion and comprehension. Through observation-work, students will learn about the day-to-day activities of a University Writing Center, and how tutors conduct themselves during their sessions with clients. Additionally, we will discuss different strategies that will help tutors as they work with English Language Learners. Students will also be trained in face-to-face and online tutoring methods, as well as individual and group tutoring methods.  Ultimately, this course should help students to feel more confident in their roles as writing consultants, and will shed insight into consulting strategies. This course is discussion-based and aims to engage students' areas of interest and expertise to the formal study of writing, literacy, and writing centers. This course will offer training in research methods and data analysis and will use the Writing Center as a research space, with a hands-on practical learning component that includes observation, supervised tutoring and, ultimately concludes with employment opportunities at the OSU Writing Center or within the Writing Associates Program.

English 3468: Special Topics in Intermediate Creative Nonfiction Writing — Reimagining the Essay
Instructor: 
Elizabeth Smith
As writers, we are using memory and imagination to create new worlds from the raw materials of the senses. Together we will explore the act of writing, the act of remembering and how the senses affect memory, the imagination and the texture of language. We will pay particular attention to setting, place, and the exploration of relationships with the physical world: how those relationships are reflected in our own physicality and how they reflect the interiority of characters—motivation, ideas, feelings and thoughts. We will examine connections between outside and inside. For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing fiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored. Prereq: Grade of C or above in 2265. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs. 

English 3662: An Introduction to Literary Publishing
Instructor:
 Kelsey Hagarman
An introduction to the theory and practice of editing and publishing literature.


4000-level

 

English 4150: Cultures of Professional Writing
Instructors:
 Staff
Examine writing in various workplaces. Analyze writing discourse that shapes professional organizations. Explore ongoing technological and cultural shifts required of workplace writers and the role of digital media.

English 4189: Professional Writing Minor — Capstone Internship
Instructor:
 Staff
Students work on-site in an organization doing writing-related work and meet weekly to discuss related topics.

English 4321: Environmental Literatures, Cultures and Media — Environmental Humanities
Instructor:
 Thomas Davis
This course will introduce students to the vibrant, interdisciplinary field of the Environmental Humanities. We will think together about the affordances of humanistic inquiry for addressing topics such as climate change, energy futures, resource extraction, environmental justice, toxicity, settler colonialism and ecotourism, among others. 

English 4400: Literary Locations — Literary Rome
Instructor:
 Sean O’Sullivan
Study of sites of literary importance, and texts connected with them in Rome. Concludes with 10-day visit to location. Taught in conjunction with English 5797.

English 4515: Chaucer
Instructor:
 Ethan Knapp
The aim of this course will be to introduce students to the poetry of Geoffrey Chaucer, starting with his early works and leading up to a reading of large sections of his most famous poem, The Canterbury Tales.  Chaucer's poetry offers a window onto an unusually exciting moment of political, cultural and philosophical transformations, and we will consequently read these poems with close attention to the society and culture that produced them, the turbulent end of the fourteenth century.  Students should also acquire a familiarity with Chaucer's Middle English and with the literary culture of the time.

English 4520.01: Shakespeare
Instructor:
 Luke Wilson
In this upper-level course in Shakespeare, we'll explore why Shakespeare remains a central figure in our culture. There's a Calvin and Hobbes comic in which Calvin is forced by his mother to eat a pile of food as it recites "To be or not to be." Is Shakespeare still good eating? Or is he a meal we're all compelled to consume whether we like it or not? I'd say he's not yet past his use-by date, and in this course we'll see why he still hits the spot, reading plays in the major dramatic genres in which he wrote - comedy, history, tragedy and what later came to be called romance - as well as some of his poems; we'll also do some ancillary critical reading. Requirements will include frequent brief informal response papers; one or two substantial essays; and a final exam. Text: The Norton Shakespeare, ed. Stephen Greenblatt, et al. 3rd ed., in two volumes.

English 4521: Renaissance Drama — The Infamous Christopher Marlowe
Instructor: 
Alan Farmer
Although Shakespeare is undeniably now the most famous playwright from early modern England, that was not always the case. In the early 1590s, when Shakespeare’s career was just beginning, Christopher Marlowe was undeniably London’s most influential and notorious playwright. A spy and supposed atheist, he was ultimately killed, and perhaps assassinated, in a barroom brawl in May 1593. Before then, Marlowe wrote plays that transformed the early modern theater in exciting, unsettling, and troubling ways. His plays are filled with disturbing villains, daring women, violent spectacles, cruel humor, and subversive political and sexual philosophies. In this course, we will read seven plays by Marlowe and consider how they offer radical explorations of such early modern—and contemporary—topics as religion, sexuality, politics, feminism, science, and power. Requirements include a couple of essays, quizzes, an exam, and active participation.

English 4522: Renaissance Poetry
Instructor:
 Sarah Neville
Dragons. Knights. Swordfights. Magicians. Princesses. Satyrs. Tournaments of Champions. King Arthur. Giants. Enchantresses. Secret meanings. Symbolism. Righteous English patriotism. A desperate plea for patronage. And that’s just the first book. Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene is a rollicking adventure story, a powerful national epic, a searching philosophical meditation and guide for moral conduct, a profound exploration of renaissance theology, a pointed critique of traditional attitudes toward gender and class, a wildly imaginative work of fantasy, and a deeply beautiful poem unto itself – this is unquestionably one of the most fascinating and complex works in all of English literature. In this course we will read the whole poem – all six books and change – paying special attention to historical questions about gender, class, politics, science, and religion. Reading all of The Faerie Queene is a major accomplishment that few people ever attempt – Publishers’ Weekly named it one of the Top Ten Most Difficult Books – making it the Everest climb on an English major’s bucket list and offering lifelong bragging rights. Are you brave enough to take the challenge? Students will be evaluated by reading quizzes, short essays, and a final creative project.

English 4540: Nineteenth-Century British Poetry
Instructor:
 Jacob Risinger
In this course, we will consider how Romantic and Victorian poets tried to make sense of the nineteenth century and its tumultuous changes. These poets were some of the first writers to grapple with the modern world as we know it. Their century was rocked by the invention of the train, the telegraph, the photograph, and the bicycle. The industrial revolution gave rise to a broad but unpredictable social realignment, and Darwin’s evolutionary hypothesis disrupted religious convictions and comfortable visions of nature. Revolutionary political ideas prompted the reconsideration of tradition, custom, and order. As the British Empire expanded to cover a quarter of the globe, both the Romantics and the Victorians confronted an increasing disjunction between local culture and a globalized world. Over the course of the semester, we will think about how these developments resulted in the formal and thematic transformation of British poetry. Poets we will discuss range from William Wordsworth and John Keats to Christina Rossetti and Oscar Wilde.

English 4542: The Nineteenth-Century British Novel
Instructor:
 Amanpal Garcha
In this course, we will study how the novels of the 1800s, in their ways of representing characters and events, reveal some of the major conflicts in nineteenth-century English society. The five works of fiction we will read – Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights, Charles Dickens's Oliver Twist, Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Anthony Trollope's The Fixed Period – try to embrace seemingly irreconcilable ideas: of a Romantic emphasis on individual passion and freedom and a more modern emphasis on social conformity; of the aristocracy's age-old cultural power and the new middle class's increasing influence; of traditional concepts of truth and new ideas from science, including Darwin's theory of evolution; of male power and women's changing roles; and of ancient community ideals and the expansion of governmental and capitalistic institutions. Requirements include regular class attendance and participation, the completion of periodic reading quizzes and a few short papers.

English 4547: Twentieth-Century Poetry
Instructor:
 Brian McHale
Readers encounter poems in various material situations – on the page of an anthology or a journal or magazine, on a website, in a book – and where we encounter them makes a difference to how we appreciate and make sense of them.  This semester we will explore one particular situation: our encounter with poems published in a collection of other poems by the same poet.  We will read about a dozen such books, cover to cover, thinking about the way the individual poems interact with each other and how they “add up” to a whole that is larger and different than the sum of the parts.

English 4550: Special Topics in Colonial and Early National Literature of the U.S.
Instructor:
 Beth Hewitt
The popularity of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton has turned the “ten dollar founding father” into something of a household name. This class will use Hamilton’s life—as immigrant, as soldier, as revolutionary, as architect of American finance, as husband—as a lens to view the story of the early United States. We will read some of Hamilton’s own work, but also a range of other political, imaginative, and economic writing including novels, pastoral poems, captivity narratives, and plays by authors including Charles Brockden Brown, Olaudah Equiano, Ben Franklin, Philip Freneau, Thomas Jefferson, Judith Sargent Murray, Tom Paine, Susanna Rowson – and, of course, Lin-Manuel Miranda.

English 4563: Contemporary Literature
Instructor:
 Jessica Prinz
This semester, English 4563 will be a comparative course in literature and science in the postmodern era , including such readings as Einstein’s Dreams (Alan Lightman), The Crying of Lot 49 (Thomas Pynchon), “If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler” (Italo Calvino), David Eggers The Circle (among others, including one or two works of science fiction, like Ishiguro’s novel, Never Let Me Go). Course requirements include two papers, two exams, and participation in discussions.

English 4565: Advanced Fiction Writing
Instructor:
 Michelle Herman
This is the advanced creative writing workshop in fiction. Admission is limited to creative writing concentrators who have taken English 2265, and to other students who have successfully completed English 2265 with permission of the instructor (by portfolio submission--please send your best complete short story to Professor Herman).

English 4566: Advanced Poetry Writing
Instructor:
 Marcus Jackson
This is the advanced course in Creative Writing-Poetry designed primarily for undergraduates who have taken the series of workshops at the beginning and intermediate levels. This is a workshop course in which you create the texts we consider. We will also look at “model” poets for prompts and inspiration. Get ready to surprise yourselves!

English 4567S: Rhetoric and Community Service
Instructor:
 Beverly Moss
In this undergraduate service learning seminar, you will experience firsthand through in-class workshops and conversations coupled with writing for a community partner how rhetoric (and writing) can affect (both positively and negatively) social change. You’ll receive assistance from me and your classmates regarding your writing for a nonprofit organization with whom I’ll pair you during the first few course meetings. Your community partnership affords you exposure to the complexity of organizational communication and nonprofit labor—exposure you may not otherwise have were you confined only to the classroom.

English 4568: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor:
 Lee Martin
This is an advanced workshop in which students will write and critique original creative nonfiction. Each student will produce two essays and will significantly revise one of them to present at the end of the semester. Admission is by portfolio submission to the instructor.

English 4569: Digital Media in English Studies — Digital Protest and Online Activism
Instructor: 
Christa Teston
Because of their networked nature and participatory potential, digital media can be powerful actors in affecting social change. We tag, tweet, retweet, reblog, reshare, swipe left, swipe right, add filters, link, like, follow, friend and more. Connections are made. Alliances are forged. Technology, power, and values are wonderfully and frightfully connected. In this class, we will investigate and experiment with digital media’s affordances and constraints—particularly for the ways they do or do not engender social concern, garner attention, mobilize human and monetary resources, and spark social justice. This course, then, is critical and creative. We will both think about and tinker with digital media. Class discussions will provide a rich and safe environment for you to explore and experiment with the consequences of humans’ relationships with digital media, while studio days will afford hands-on guidance in leveraging digital media for the purpose of protest and activism. I also anticipate that events in the world will go on happening as they did before this class ever existed. So while the course has overarching learning objectives (listed below), how those objectives are achieved may be modified in response to uprisings, disasters, attacks, and other events of social consequence yet to occur.

English 4573.02: Rhetoric and Social Action — Health and Illness Activism
Instructor:
 Margaret Price
This course investigates sites of social action including public speech, demonstrations, social-media communications, and art/activism (“artivism”) that relate to questions of health and illness. We’ll study the rhetorical and discursive work that circulates around contemporary social-action movements such as The Ice Bucket Challenge, Breaking Out, Disability Justice, and The Icarus Project. We’ll engage questions such as these: Why did the Ice Bucket Challenge take off so vigorously (with more than 17 million participants worldwide), and who actually benefited from all that money and visibility? What are the implications of more “covert” movements such as Project Semicolon—again, who benefits, and how is “benefit” being defined? What are the implications when health/illness activism moves globally—for example, when people based in the U.S. text a number to donate money for disaster-relief support, medical supplies, or clean water?

English 4578 (20): Special Topics in Film — Hollywood in the Seventies
Instructors:
 Jared Gardner
This course will explore one of the most interesting periods in American film industry, from the New Hollywood maverick directors who reigned supreme at the start of the decade to the rise of the blockbuster at decade's end. We will explore dominant themes during this period—such as paranoia and conspiracy—alongside the emergence of underground and fringe cinema.

English 4578 (30): Special Topics in Film — Film and American Society after World War II
Instructors: Ryan Friedman
This course examines the history of the American cinema in the years immediately following the Second World War, focusing on the ways in which Hollywood movies reflected, responded to, and inflected the major social issues of the period. We will view and discuss classic films from a variety of genres, contextualizing them by reading both primary sources (like government documents and period magazine articles) and the work of contemporary film historians. Most weeks will pair a specific film with a significant social development from the period (for instance, Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House with economic “reconversion,” The Best Years of Our Lives with the so-called “veterans problem,” and Blackboard Jungle with the emergence of “juvenile delinquency”). We will also examine the development of film technology and style during the 1940s and 50s, thinking about phenomena like the rise of Technicolor and widescreen formats and the emergence of film noir.

English 4580: Special Topics in LGBTQ Literatures and Cultures — The Speculative Closet: Queering Horror, Fantasy and Sci-Fi
Instructor:
 Nick White
In this course, we will explore how queer writers approach supernatural and futuristic elements in narrative fiction. We will read novels by the likes of Octavia Butler, Jewelle Gómez, Rainbow Rowell, Emma Donoghue, Michael Cunningham, Perry Moore, Poppy Z. Brite and others. There will be quizzes, daily writings, a presentation and one final project.

English 4582: Special Topics in African American Literature — Rethinking the Romance Plot: Love, Marriage and Singleness in African American Culture
Instructor:
 Andrea Williams
From romance narratives, we’ve grown accustomed to women’s stories that end with marriage as the “happily ever after.” But what else might constitute a fitting story, particularly for single women? This class traces the enduring, but changing, appeal of the romance plot by examining how African American culture represents the lives, loves, and adventures of single black women. Studying literature, film, television, and music, we will pursue questions such as these: Why might an artist choose to focus on an unmarried protagonist or narrator? How can we account for the popular success of “chick lit” or its African American parallel, “sista girl” fiction?  How do matters of class, privilege and citizenship relate to who has the chance to marry or not? Course materials may include texts by Nella Larsen, Toni Morrison, Terry McMillan, and others, as well as pop culture productions by Shonda Rhimes and Beyoncé. Assignments may include quizzes, reading journal, response paper (3-5 pages) and final essay (7-10 pages).

English 4583: Special Topics in World Literature in English
Instructor:
 Pranav Jani
Study of literatures written in English and produced outside of the U.S. and Britain; topics include colonial/postcolonial writing, regional literature, theoretical and historical approaches, genres.

English 4587: Special Topics in Asian American Literature and Culture: Empire, Diaspora, Sexuality
Instructor:
 Martin Ponce
This course examines Asian American literature through three frameworks that have become indispensable to studying this body of work: empire, diaspora, and sexuality. We will use these concepts to explore some of the main themes, issues, and problems that Asian American studies has grappled with since its emergence as an academic interdiscipline in the late 1960s. Through readings of key literary and scholarly texts and viewings of documentary films and other visual artifacts, we will consider a variety of topics that extend from the 19th century to the present: Chinese immigration and exclusion, U.S. colonialism in the Philippines and Filipino immigration, South Asian labor migrations, Japanese American internment and redress, U.S. and Asian settler colonialism in Hawai’i, the complex aftermaths of the Korean and Viet Nam/American wars, the Asian American movement and the activist roots of Asian American Studies, the “model minority” myth, the transformations of post-1965 Asian America, and the reconfigurations of race and religion after 9/11/2001. Throughout the course, we will remain attentive to the ways that race and ethnicity intersect with class, gender, sexuality, dis/ability, location, and other social differences to produce the heterogeneous imaginary known as “Asian America.” Possible authors include Carlos Bulosan, Jessica Hagedorn, Mohsin Hamid, Maxine Hong Kingston, Jhumpa Lahiri, Chang-rae Lee, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Julie Otsuka, Aimee Phan.

English 4590.02H: The Renaissance
Instructor:
 Jennifer Higginbotham
This class is about the pleasure of poetry and the poetry of pleasure in Renaissance England. What made poems sound good to Shakespeare and his contemporaries, and what makes those same poems sound good or not to us? Students will master knowledge of the key Renaissance poetic forms and genres, including the sonnet sequence, metrical patterns such as iambic pentameter, blank verse, ballad, narrative, and lyric. We will be doing the equivalent of taking apart an engine to figure out how it works. Readings will include the master stylists of the age, such as Katherine Philips and John Milton, but we’ll also examine some poetry that is so bad it’s good. Non-honors students are welcome, and no previous work in the Renaissance is required.

English 4591.01H: Honors Special Topics in Creative Writing
Instructor:
 Elissa Washuta
In conversations about nonfiction and its basis in verifiable facts, how do we handle the unverifiable—the supernatural, the eerie, the awesome, the magical? What do we do with that which can’t be fact-checked, which fills us with wonder and doubt? In this course, we will read literary nonfiction devoted to supernatural occurrences and displays of illusion, ranging from the magician’s secrets to unexplainable phenomena. We’ll employ intuitive techniques and introspective tools like tarot to create new essays, we’ll learn about incorporating research into our first-person accounts, and we’ll consider issues of appropriation, commodification and overexposure of sacred practices. Students will be expected to read, write and workshop.

English 4592 (10): Special Topics in Women in Literature and Culture
Instructor:
 Roxann Wheeler
This course teaches students several ways to analyze literature written by and about women through the principles of feminist theory. We will explore the fictional strategies that the first commercially successful women writers employed, including the formal features of narration, structure, plot, and character that they inherited and shaped, the generic features of several early forms of the novel, and the content. This period of 1660-1808 is remarkable in literary history because the modern novel was a new commercial genre; women writers dominated this market and shaped key conventions still recognizable today such as romantic comedy in novel and film as well as problem novels that explore social ills that call for economic, social, and even political reform. Four of our writers wrote novels that explored the nexus of slavery, capitalism, and racism. Recent events in our lives, such as the renewed interest in safe spaces and hate speech, Black Lives Matter, and the #MeToo movement, attention to unequal pay for equal work, and what liberty means for women are issues that compelled a number of women writers of the long eighteenth century, albeit in a very different context than today.

English 4592 (20): Special Topics in Women in Literature and Culture
Instructor:
 Sandra MacPherson
Using feminist perspectives, students will learn to analyze literature and other cultural works (film, television, digital media) written by or about women.

English 4998: Undergraduate Research — Thesis
Instructor:
 Staff
A program of reading arranged for each student, with individual conferences, reports and a paper and/or thesis.

English 4998H: Honors Research
Instructor:
 Staff
A program of reading arranged for each student with individual conferences, reports and an honors thesis. Open only to candidates for distinction in English.


5000-level

 

English 5189s/CompStd 5189s: Ohio Field School
Instructor:
 Cassie Patterson
The Ohio Field Schools course provides an introduction to ethnographic field methods (participant-observation, writing field notes, photographic documentation, audio-interviewing), archiving and the public exhibition of research for both undergraduates and graduate students. Students will contribute to a team-based, immersive research project designed to document the ways that diverse communities express and preserve a sense of place in the face of economic, environmental and cultural change. This semester-long, experientially-based course will consist of three parts:

  1. Introduction to fieldwork (on Ohio State campus in Columbus)
  2. A one-week field experience in Scioto County during spring break (where students will reside together on-site)
  3. Accessioning, digital gallery preparation and reflection (on Ohio State campus in Columbus.

Thus, throughout the semester, students will practice all of the skills necessary to construct a permanent record of local expressive culture that will be accessible to future researchers and community members. Participation in all parts of the course is required.
*Advanced undergraduate students are encouraged to enroll in 5000-level courses.*

English 5191: Promotional Media Internship
Instructor:
 Scott DeWitt
This internship opportunity will offer students experience in creating timely, relevant and compelling short-form promotional media (primarily video and audio) for the Department of English. Students will work closely with their supervisor as well as with key communications personnel to develop projects and set priorities and deadlines. English 5191, Promotional Media Internship, will be intensely hands-on and focus almost exclusively on digital media production and related work-management skills in professional settings. This internship site requires students to work both independently and collaboratively. This internship opportunity is especially applicable to English majors who would like to develop their digital media skills in a workplace setting and for those who have digital media skills with nowhere to apply them. Students with digital media skills are encouraged to enroll.  However, media skills are NOT a pre-requisite; students will learn all media skills necessary for the class. (This internship does not fulfill the digital media requirement for the Writing, Rhetoric, and Literacy concentration in the English Major.)
*Advanced undergraduate students are encouraged to enroll in 5000-level courses.*

English 5664: Studies in Graphic Narrative: Comics, History and Time
Instructor:
 Jared Gardner
This course will examine the ways in which graphic narrative considers new ways of narrating history and representing time. We will look at a wide range of texts, both fiction and non-fiction, including works by Chris Ware, Jason Lutes, Joe Sacco, Rutu Modan, Emil Ferris, and Kyle Baker.
*Advanced undergraduate students are encouraged to enroll in 5000-level courses.*

English 5723.01/02: Graduate Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture
Instructor: 
Staff
*Advanced undergraduate students are encouraged to enroll in 5000-level courses.*

English 5804: Analyzing Language in Social Media
Instructor:
 Lauren Squires, Marie-Catherine de Marneffe
This course will approach the study of language and interaction in social media from both theoretical and practical angles. From the theoretical side, we will explore why social media are of interest for linguistic and other social science researchers, focusing on previous research findings about communicative behavior in social media. From the practical side, we will teach students to perform analysis of social media behavior, covering all steps in the research process from data collection/selection to quantitative and qualitative analysis and reporting. Students in the course will learn to think more critically about these daily media practices and their role in society, and they will also gain hands-on skills they can take to their future endeavors. No previous experience in linguistics or programming is required, though some background in the study of language will be helpful.
*Advanced undergraduate students are encouraged to enroll in 5000-level courses.*

Text

1000-level

 

English 1109: Intensive Writing and Reading
Instructor: Staff
Provides intensive practice in integrating academic reading and writing.

English 1110.01 (01, 02, 58): First-Year English Composition
Instructor: Angela Romines
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers.
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01 (03, 04, 26): First-Year English Composition
Instructor: Lauren Cook
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers.
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01 (13, 39, 48): First-Year English Composition
Instructor: Sonya Parrish
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers.
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01 (37): First-Year English Composition
Instructor: Katelyn Hartke
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers.
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01 (49): First-Year English Composition
Instructor: Madeline Price
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers.
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01 (68): First-Year English Composition
Instructor: Chad Iwertz
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers.
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01 (76): First-Year English Composition
Instructor: Francis Donoghue
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers.
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01: First-Year English Composition — The Fantastical Other
Instructor
: Michael Grifka
Vampires, shapeshifters, aliens, witches: fiction is rich with depictions of the not-quite-human. Why have writers throughout the ages been fascinated by supernatural beings? How do their differences from us underline their similarities? In novels, comics, video games, and films, we will investigate the question of how supernatural beings reveal our anxieties about the Other, that mysterious category that tells us so much about our own nature. Through the course, we will explore stories of supernatural difference as an entry point to exploring the construction of humanity in fiction, and the stakes of departing from “acceptable” limits. Students will use our readings as a springboard to develop their analytical writing and thinking skills, and will have the opportunity to develop their own research questions in line with the concerns of the class. As we go through the semester, we will investigate the crucial questions: why are we fascinated by the supernatural other? When do they become monstrous, and why? And what happens when we desire to be them?
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01: First-Year English Composition
Instructor:
Staff
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers.
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.02: First-Year English Composition
Instructor
: Staff
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers. Taught with an emphasis on literary texts.
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.03: First-Year English Composition
Instructor
: Staff
Intensive practice in fundamentals of expository writing illustrated in the student's own writing and essays of professional writers; offered in a small class setting and linked with an individual tutoring component in its concurrent course, ENGLISH-1193. This course is available for EM credit only through the AP program.
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1193: Individual Studies
Instructor
: Staff
Intensive practice in the fundamentals of expository writing.


2000-level

 

English 2201 (10): Selected Works of British Literature — Medieval through 1800
Instructor
: Karen Winstead
This survey will introduce students to the vibrant minds and culture that produced the masterpieces of British literary heritage. Students will sample the writings of poets, playwrights, essayists and novelists including Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton and Johnson. Readers will get to know the worlds they inhabited, the issues they cared about and how they may have thought about themselves as artists and human beings. While exploring the past, students will find surprising precedents for popular genres of contemporary times, including horror, romance and graphic narrative. English 2201 is a foundational course for English majors but it is also a rewarding experience for anyone seeking an appreciation of English literary heritage. Lectures will sketch out the contours of literary history, and weekly recitations will provide opportunities for group close reading and discussion. Requirements include a final exam, a journal of responses to the readings and weekly online quizzes on the lectures.
GE: Literature; Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2201: Selected Works of British Literature — Medieval through 1800
Instructor
: Staff
An introductory critical study of the works of major British writers from 800 to 1800.
GE: Literature; Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2220 (10): Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructor
: Jennifer Higginbotham
Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience.
GE: Literature; Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2220 (20): Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructor
: Luke Wilson
Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience.
GE: Literature; Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2220 (30): Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructor
: Hannibal Hamlin
For four centuries now, William Shakespeare has been widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language. We come not to praise Shakespeare, however, but to study him, reading a sampling of his plays, in a variety of genres and over the course of his career. Though literary reviewing of the Siskel and Ebert variety is not our business (thumbs up? thumbs down?), we will want to ask and discuss why Shakespeare has been so highly praised by so many, for so long-what is it that gives his literary work its power and appeal? We will also ask how his plays work as theater; how he adapts and transforms the source material on which so many of his plays depend; how Shakespeare can be such an "original" when he borrows so much from other writers; how he can create such deep and realistic characters; and how it is that Shakespeare can accomplish all of the above (and more) through language. In order to explore these and other questions, we will need to consider a variety of approaches to Shakespeare's plays. Of course, first and foremost, we will be reading some wonderful literature. Plays will include Henry IV Part 1A Midsummer Night’s DreamHamletAntony and Cleopatra, and Cymbeline, and we’ll also read some poems. Assignments will include two short critical papers, a midterm test, and a final exam.
GE: Literature; Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2220: Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructor
: Staff
Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience.
GE: Literature; Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2220H (10): Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructor
: Alan Farmer
In this course students will read several plays written by Shakespeare and consider how they both conform to and work against the genres of comedy, tragedy, history and romance. Looking at the plays as works to be both performed and read, the class will pay particular attention to the politics of gender, religion and kingship in the plays, topics that Shakespeare returned to again and again and that were vitally important, and indeed controversial, in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. In addition to some critical and historical essays on the early modern theater and culture, students will read some combination of the following plays: Henry VTwo Gentlemen of VeronaTwelfth NightMeasure for MeasureMacbethJulius CaesarCoriolanus and the Tempest. Requirements include a midterm exam, final exam, two essays (one shorter, one longer), regular attendance and active participation.
GE: Literature; Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2260 (20): Introduction to Poetry
Instructor
: Jacob Risinger
How can poems written hundreds of years ago still resonate with our experiences of love, grief, anxiety, ecstasy, and apprehension?  This course will serve as an introduction and grand tour of classic and contemporary British and American poetry.  It will also be a course where we think about how poetry intersects with ordinary human life.  Over the course of the semester, we will consider the major themes, forms, contexts, and innovations that have shaped the evolution of poetry.  How has love poetry changed over the four centuries that separate Shakespeare from Seamus Heaney?  Why do poets like William Wordsworth, Langston Hughes, and Bob Dylan turn to the ballad as a form of social and aesthetic critique?  What poetic devices do metaphysical poets like John Donne and pop artists like Katy Perry share in common? We will read a great deal of poetry, from Shakespeare to current US Poet Laureate Tracy Smith.   No prior familiarity with poetry is necessary.   
GE: Literature

English 2260: Introduction to Poetry
Instructor
: Staff
Designed to help students understand and appreciate poetry through an intensive study of a representative group of poems.
GE: Literature

English 2261 (10): Introduction to Fiction
Instructor
: Jessica Prinz
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations; comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.
GE: Literature

English 2261: Introduction to Fiction
Instructor
: Staff
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations; comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.
GE: Literature

English 2261H (10): Introduction to Fiction
Instructor
: Francis Donoghue
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations; comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.
GE: Literature

English 2263 (10): Introduction to Film
Instructor
: Sean O’Sullivan
Introduction to methods of reading film texts by analyzing cinema as technique, as system and as cultural product.
GE: Visual and Performing Art

English 2263: Introduction to Film
Instructor
: Staff
Introduction to methods of reading film texts by analyzing cinema as technique, as system and as cultural product.
GE: Visual and Performing Art

English 2264 (10): Introduction to Pop Culture Studies
Instructor
: Alexandra Sterne
Introduction to the analysis of popular culture texts.
GE: Cultures and Ideas
Cross-listed in Comparative Studies

English 2264 (20): Introduction to Pop Culture Studies
Instructor
: Frank DiPiero
Introduction to the analysis of popular culture texts.
GE: Cultures and Ideas
Cross-listed in Comparative Studies

English 2264 (30): Introduction to Pop Culture Studies
Instructor
: Pritha Prasad
Introduction to the analysis of popular culture texts.
GE: Cultures and Ideas
Cross-listed in Comparative Studies

English 2265 (10): Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructor
: Molly Rideout
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.

English 2265 (20): Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructor
: Alaina Belisle
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.

English 2265 (30): Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructor
: Elizabeth Blackford
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.

English 2265 (40): Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructor
: Neil Grayson
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.

English 2266 (10): Introductory Poetry Writing
Instructor
: Emmalee Hagarman
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, composition and prosody; practice in the writing of poetry; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published poems by established poets.

English 2267 (10): Introduction to Creative Writing
Instructor
: Kelsey Hagarman
An introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction. Analysis and discussion of student work, with reference to the general methods and scope of all three genres.

English 2268 (10): Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor
: Caroline Angell
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of creative nonfiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published essays by masters of the many forms of creative nonfiction.

English 2268 (20): Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor
: Julia Garbuz
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of creative nonfiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published essays by masters of the many forms of creative nonfiction.

English 2269 (10): Digital Media Composing
Instructor
: Gavin Johnson
Mobile devices--such as smart phones, computer tablets, and wearable devices--are ubiquitous, rhetorical technologies that we use daily to compose. From text messages to viral videos, we use mobile composing practices to complete everyday tasks while expressing ourselves and engaging our communities. In this course, students will consider the intersections of technologies, composing practices, and identity while producing original material using mobile devices. Our examination of identity will include topics like race, gender, age, sexuality, and disability. Our goal is to not only discuss the possibilities available when composing with mobile technologies but also provide students with a new way to think critically about themselves, their communities, and their mobile devices. You do not need previous experience with video, audio, or image editing technologies in order to complete class projects; you will receive necessary instruction and practice during the course of the semester.
GE: Visual and Performing Arts

English 2269 (40): Digital Media Composing
Instructor
: Laura Allen
Mobile devices--such as smart phones, computer tablets, and wearable devices--are ubiquitous, rhetorical technologies that we use daily to compose. From text messages to viral videos, we use mobile composing practices to complete everyday tasks while expressing ourselves and engaging our communities. In this course, students will consider the intersections of technologies, composing practices, and identity while producing original material using mobile devices. Our examination of identity will include topics like race, gender, age, sexuality, and disability. Our goal is to not only discuss the possibilities available when composing with mobile technologies but also provide students with a new way to think critically about themselves, their communities, and their mobile devices. You do not need previous experience with video, audio, or image editing technologies in order to complete class projects; you will receive necessary instruction and practice during the course of the semester.
GE: Visual and Performing Arts

English 2270: Introduction to Folklore
Instructor
: Staff
Folklore theory and methods explored through engagement with primary sources: folktale, legend, jokes, folksong, festival, belief and art. Folklore minor course.
GE: Cultures and Ideas
Cross-listed with Comparative Studies 2350

English 2276: Arts of Persuasion
Instructor
: Staff
Introduces students to the study and practice of rhetoric and how arguments are shaped by technology, media and cultural contexts.
GE: Cultures and Ideas

English 2277: Introduction to Disability Studies
Instructor
: Staff
Foundational concepts and issues in disability studies; introduction to the sociopolitical models of disability.
GE: Cultures and Ideas

English 2280 (10): The English Bible
Instructor
: James Fredal
In 2280, students will read the Bible pretty much straight through. Not the whole thing, but much of it, to understand what it says, what it doesn’t say, and what it means. The class will talk about the different kinds of Bible literature--myths, tales, laws, poetry, parables, proverbs and the like--and talk about the cultural context in which this literature was written. Students will look at techniques for understanding why the Bible looks the way it does, and some traditional methods of biblical interpretation. If you’ve ever wondered what is in the Bible, or you’ve read the Bible from a religious point of view and want a non-doctrinal perspective, this class will be for you. Students will have an opportunity to read, talk about, ask about and learn about the Bible as an amazing an influential work of literature.  
GE: Literature

English 2281 (10): Introduction to African-American Literature
Instructor
: Koritha Mitchell
This course will not only introduce students to major figures in African American literature; it will also place these figures in the context of African American history and culture. We will work from the premise that this literary tradition has never existed solely to respond to so-called "dominant" culture and "mainstream" literature. In addition to well-known writers, such as Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston, this course will explore the work of equally important but less widely known authors, such as Harriet Jacobs, Ida B. Wells, Charles Chesnutt and Audre Lorde. All students must invest in both volumes of the Norton Anthology of African American Literature.
GE: Literature; Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
Cross-listed with African American Studies

English 2282 (10): Introduction to Queer Studies
Instructor
: Lesia Pagulich
Introduces and problematizes foundational concepts of the interdisciplinary field of queer studies, highlighting the intersections of sexuality with race, class and nationality.
GE: Cultures and Ideas; Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
Cross-listed in Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies

English 2282 (20): Introduction to Queer Studies
Instructor
: Zachary Harvat
Introduces and problematizes foundational concepts of the interdisciplinary field of queer studies, highlighting the intersections of sexuality with race, class and nationality.
GE: Cultures and Ideas; Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
Cross-listed in Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies

English 2291 (10): U.S. Literature 1865 to Present
Instructor
: Brian McHale
This course provides a broad survey of American literature over a century and a half, from the aftermath of the Civil War to the new millennium. Examining a wide range of fiction, nonfiction, poetry and drama, the course studies literary engagements with such historical and cultural phenomena as post-Civil War Reconstruction; the expanding social, economic and cultural networks of the late-nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; immigration and internal migration; race and regional identity; the two World Wars and other armed conflicts of the twentieth-century; and the increasingly rapid pace of social and technological changes over the last half-century. Our investigation of literary responses and influences will include attention to such literary genres, trends and movements as the short story, the emergence of new forms of poetry, realism and its variants, modernism and postmodernism.
GE: Literature

English 2367.01: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience
Instructor
: Staff
Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America.
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.); Writing and Communication—Level 2

English 2367.01H (40): Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience
Instructor
: Pranav Jani
Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America.
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.); Writing and Communication—Level 2

English 2367.02: Literature in the U.S. Experience
Instructor
: Staff
Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.
GE: Literature; Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.); Writing and Communication—Level 2

English 2367.02H: Literature in the U.S. Experience
Instructor
: Staff
Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.
GE: Literature; Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.); Writing and Communication—Level 2

English 2367.03: Documentary in the U.S. Experience
Instructor
: Staff
An intermediate course that extends and refines skills in critical reading and expository writing through analysis of written texts, video and documentaries.
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 2

English 2367.05: The U.S. Folk Experience
Instructor
: Staff
Concepts of American folklore and ethnography; folk groups, tradition and fieldwork methodology; how these contribute to the development of critical reading, writing and thinking skills.
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.); Writing and Communication—Level 2

English 2463: Introduction to Video Game Analysis
Instructor
: Staff
An introduction to humanities-based methods of analyzing and interpreting video games in terms of form, genre, style and theory. No background in video game play is necessary. All students will have regular opportunities for hands-on experience with different game types and genres in both the computer-based classroom and the Department of English Video Game Lab.
GE: Visual and Performing Arts


3000-level

 

English 3150 (10): Career Preparation for English and Related Majors
Instructor:
Jennifer Patton
This general elective course helps English majors and students from other Humanities disciplines to explore and prepare for careers after graduation. Students will analyze texts to gain a practical and theoretical understanding of the world of work. They will learn to identify their own strengths and preferences to guide their job activity and career choices.

English 3271: Structure of the English Language
Instructor:
Staff
Students learn basic characteristics of English linguistics focusing on the basic building blocks of language; the sounds of English and how they are put together, word formation processes and rules for combining words into utterances/sentences. Students investigate and explore linguistic variation, accents of American English and the implications of language evaluation in educational settings.

English 3304 (50): Business and Professional Writing
Instructor:
John Jones
The study of principles and practices of business and professional writing.

English 3304 : Business and Professional Writing
Instructor:
Staff
The study of principles and practices of business and professional writing.

English 3305 (10): Technical Writing
Instructor:
Samuel Head
The study of principles and practices of technical writing. Emphasis on the style, organization and conventions of technical and research reports, proposals, memoranda, professional correspondence, etc.

English 3305: Technical Writing
Instructor:
Staff
The study of principles and practices of technical writing. Emphasis on the style, organization and conventions of technical and research reports, proposals, memoranda, professional correspondence, etc.

English 3331 (10): Thinking Theoretically
Instructor:
Sandra MacPherson
Study of fundamental texts and practices informing contemporary understandings of theory in the humanities and social sciences.
GE: Literature

English 3361 (10): Narrative and Medicine
Instructor:
James Phelan
Study of fictional and nonfictional narratives offering diverse perspectives on such medical issues as illness, aging, health and healing, treatment and doctor-patient relationships.
GE: Literature

English 3364: Special Topics in Pop Culture
Instructor:
Staff
Focused study in reading popular culture texts, organized around a single theme, period or medium.
GE: Cultures and Ideas

English 3364 (30): Special Topics in Pop Culture — True Crime
Instructor:
Elizabeth Hewitt
This course will study the long and varied tradition of true crime narratives. Beginning with the stories of witches, murderers, and sexual vandals that so captivated their 17th century audiences, to Victorian serial murderers like Jack the Ripper, to modern celebrity crimes and criminals, students will consider why writers and readers so often turn to blood, violence and malfeasance as the stuff of entertainment. We will read in a wide variety of genres (confession narratives, novels, exposes, genre fiction) and in a wide variety of media (books, comics, television, film) as we traverse the long history of this literary and cultural form. Authors will include: Edgar Allen Poe, Alan Moore, Truman Capote, Vincent Bugliosi, Janet Malcolm and James Ellroy.
GE: Cultures and Ideas

English 3372 (10): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy — FutureNow
Instructor:
Jared Gardner
We often think about science fictions as speculations about the distant future, but the genre is always thinking about the present. In this class we will be focusing on speculative fictions set in a not-so-distant future which ask us to consider how the decisions we make today can shape our future worlds.
GE: Literature

English 3372: Science Fiction and/or Fantasy
Instructor:
Staff
Introduction to the tradition and practice of speculative writing. Provides students the opportunity to examine and compare works of science fiction and/or fantasy.
GE: Literature

English 3378 (10): Special Topics in Film and Literature
Instructor:
Frederick Aldama
Have you ever wondered why you love watching superhero movies or reading comics? Why do we pay money to go see something that we know is clearly not real? This course examines the art of film and comics storytelling and, simultaneously, the emotion and cognitive responses that they trigger. We will focus on the contemporary period to see how filmmakers and comic book creators build their storyworlds as well as audience consumption. We will also explore the crosspollination of devices used to give shape to filmic and comic book storytelling modes. We will acquire theoretical concepts and tools to understand better how our set of films and comics are built and how they might make (or not) new our perception, thought, and feeling concerning issues of racism, ableism, misogyny, homophobia and the like.
GE: Cultures and Ideas

English 3379 (10): Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy
Instructor:
Susan Lang
Introduction to the interrelated fields of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy, familiarizing students with key concepts that underlie work in these interrelated fields and to the scholarly methods of WRL. Together, this discipline studies the ways people use language and other symbols to convey messages, persuade audiences, and create meaning and how these practices are learned and taught.

English 3379 (20): Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy
Instructor:
Jonathan Buehl
Introduction to the interrelated fields of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy, familiarizing students with key concepts that underlie work in these interrelated fields and to the scholarly methods of WRL. Together, this discipline studies the ways people use language and other symbols to convey messages, persuade audiences, and create meaning and how these practices are learned and taught.

English 3398 (10): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor
: Koritha Mitchell
This class will introduce students to a variety of "methods" for literary studies. It builds on the critical thinking and writing skills that students already possess by offering opportunities to put forth clear, thesis-driven arguments. We will cover several theoretical approaches to literature. In many cases, we will examine Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby through different lenses in order to get a feel for how these approaches illuminate the richness of a single text. To further test the theories introduced, we will read other literary forms, including drama and poetry.

English 3398 (20): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
Jacob Risinger
In this gateway course, we’ll take our cue from one of George Orwell’s famous lines: “If people cannot write well, they cannot think well, and if they cannot think well, others will do their thinking for them.”  Over the course of the semester, our weekly readings, discussions, and informal exercises will work to annihilate old patterns of complacent reading—leaving in their place the analytical skills and rhetorical strategies you need to establish your own critical/original perspective on literary texts.   We’ll attend to the practical work of conducting literary research and writing solid, well-argued essays—but we’ll also practice using literary theory and various methods of criticism to identify new levels of meaning, even in familiar or (seemingly) straightforward texts.  The hard work of writing and analysis will be supplemented by an array of engaging texts.  We’ll start with The Winter’s Tale—one of Shakespeare’s “problem plays”—and end with Tom Stoppard’s recent play The Hard Problem.  Along the way, we’ll read poetry by Yeats, Elizabeth Bishop and Claudia Rankine; short stories by James Baldwin, Raymond Carver and Nathaniel Hawthorne; and Jesmyn Ward’s novel Salvage the Bones (recipient of the 2011 National Book Award).  Requirements will include attendance, active participation, informal writing exercises and five essays.

English 3398 (30): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
Antony Shuttleworth
This course is designed as the gateway to the English major. The course emphasizes the skills required to make the transition from a "reader" to a "critic" of literary texts: close reading; an introduction to literary theory and methods of criticism; library research; methods of writing papers with a clear argument, effectively selected evidence and virtually no errors of grammar, punctuation, usage and style—the requirements for excellence in upper division courses. The basis for analysis and discussion will be the different ways in which human evil has been represented in literature, examined mainly in poems and short stories. 

English 3398 (60): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
Sandra MacPherson
Serves as the "Methods" course for the Literature and Creative Writing concentrations within the English major. Its purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing. Required of English majors. Open to English majors only or others by department permission.

English 3398 (70): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
Sean O’Sullivan
Serves as the "Methods" course for the Literature and Creative Writing concentrations within the English major. Its purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing. Required of English majors. Open to English majors only or others by department permission.

English 3398 (80): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
Ethan Knapp
Serves as the "Methods" course for the Literature and Creative Writing concentrations within the English major. Its purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing. Required of English majors. Open to English majors only or others by department permission.

English 3405 (10): Special Topics in Professional Communication
Instructor:
Susan Lang
Study of principles and practices in technical communication, technical editing, managerial communication, international business communication, visual rhetoric, writing for the web and scientific writing.

English 3405: Special Topics in Professional Communication
Instructor:
Staff
Study of principles and practices in technical communication, technical editing, managerial communication, international business communication, visual rhetoric, writing for the web and scientific writing.

English 3465 (30): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing
Instructor:
Memory Risinger
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing fiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.

English 3465 (20): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing
Instructor:
Tyler Sones
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing fiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.

English 3466 (10): Special Topics in Intermediate Poetry Writing
Instructor:
Pablo Tanguay
Advancing on what you learned in 2266, we will focus on turning thoughts into poems, turning feelings into poems, turning the world around us into poems. We will read poems and write poems and talk about poems and think about poems. We will be rigorous and thorough and exacting. We will be carefee and flippant and wild. We will be all poem, all the time.

English 3467S (10): Issues and Methods in Tutoring Writing
Instructor:
Beverly Moss
This course will focus on theories and practices in tutoring writing. The aim of this course is to prepare undergraduates to work with writers from diverse backgrounds and disciplines. This class provides a unique opportunity for its members to learn about composition theory and pedagogy, tutoring strategies and writing center theories and practices in order to put these theories and practices to work in classroom and writing center settings. Students will apprentice as writing consultants in the University Writing Center. Therefore, in addition to regularly scheduled class time, students enrolled in this course will spend approximately one hour per week for six weeks in the Writing Center. Upon completing the course, students are eligible to apply for paid positions in the University Writing Center.

English 3468 (10): Special Topics in Intermediate Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor
: Steffan Hruby
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing creative nonfiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.

English 3662 (10): An Introduction to Literary Publishing
Instructor:
Eliza Smith
An introduction to the theory and practice of editing and publishing literature. Students will engage complex aspects of the literary publishing landscape as writers, readers and editors. This class is aimed at young writers interested in the inner workings of literary magazines and publishing houses, as well as aspiring editors, publicists and agents interested in careers in the publishing industry, either in the "Big Five" houses or for small, independent presses. The course is also for anyone who has a serious interest in the public presentation of literature.


4000-level

 

English 4150 (10): Cultures of Professional Writing
Instructor: 
Staff
Examine writing in various workplaces. Analyze writing discourse that shapes professional organizations. Explore ongoing technological and cultural shifts required of workplace writers and the role of digital media.

English 4150 (20): Cultures of Professional Writing
Instructor: 
Jennifer Patton
Examine writing in various workplaces. Analyze writing discourse that shapes professional organizations. Explore ongoing technological and cultural shifts required of workplace writers and the role of digital media.

English 4189: Professional Writing Minor: Capstone Internship
Instructor:
 Jennifer Patton
Students work onsite in an organization doing writing-related work and meet weekly to discuss related topics.

English 4513: Introduction to Medieval Literature
Instructor: 
Leslie Lockett
This course introduces students to major genres of medieval European literature written over the span of a millennium and situates those works of literature within their diverse historical and intellectual contexts.  Building upon selections from classical Rome and early Christianity, we will explore the medieval literature of feud and warfare, romance, monastic and scholastic learning and popular religion and mysticism. This is a literary history class, so in addition to wrestling with the ideas conveyed by the readings, students will be accountable for learning when, where, and in what languages and genres our readings were composed. We will also devote time to dismantling “presentist” misconceptions about the Middle Ages, particularly those that oversimplify pliable categories such as “hero” and “feminist.” Major assignments (research papers and in-class presentation) will emphasize research skills and the integration of multiple primary and secondary sources into literary-historical analysis.

English 4520.01: Shakespeare 
Instructor:
 Jennifer Higginbotham
In late sixteenth-century London, on the south bank of the Thames, amongst bear-baiting rings and brothels stood a round wooden theater that brought together people from all walks of life—aristocrats and merchants, cobblers and tailors, seamstresses and fishwives. It was for this space and for these people that William Shakespeare first wrote his influential plays, and in this course, we’ll be imagining what it was like to stand with them and watch Shakespeare’s theater in action. This particular section of Introduction to Shakespeare will be experimenting with cutting edge techniques for facilitating embodied learning through the combination of rehearsal room techniques modeled on professional theater companies with close textual analysis of Shakespeare’s language. Our in-depth exploration will include selected comedies and tragedies, not to mention a lot of fun along the way.

English 4520.02: Special Topics in Shakespeare — Hamlet: Prehistory and Afterlife
Instructor:
 Christopher Highley
Every great actor has aspired to play the lead; many a writer has responded to it; and Shakespearean critics continue to fathom its mysteries. Why for the last 400 years or so has Hamlet—the play and the character—proven so central to the western cultural imagination?  Why is the figure of the prince addressing a human skull so iconic, and the words, ‘to be or not to be,’ so instantly recognizable? This class will approach such questions by placing Shakespeare’s play in a broad literary and historical context—one that looks back to the Greco-Roman origins of revenge drama; examines Shakespeare’s immediate sources as well as contemporaneous revenge tragedies and religious controversies; and traces the afterlife of the play and its title character in other literature, in art, on film and in other popular media. We will discover that Hamlet is not one unchanging thing: Shakespeare’s play survives in three quite distinct early printed versions and its cultural afterlife is one of continual change, adaptation, and reimagining.

English 4523: Special Topics in Renaissance Literature and Culture — Popularity and Popular Culture in Renaissance England
Instructor: 
Alan Farmer
In addition to being undeniably popular in the theater, Shakespeare was a best-selling author in Renaissance England. But what other authors were popular during this period, and what were other best-selling works? What does it even mean for a text or an author to be “popular,” and what kinds of texts in general were popular?  In this course, we will read “popular” works in Renaissance England as we consider such issues as popular vs. elite culture, the dangers of popularity in politics and culture, and the economics of popularity in the early modern book trade.  The course readings will range from “low” forms of popular literary culture, such as ballads, plays and satirical pamphlets by authors such as Shakespeare, Thomas Kyd and Thomas Dekker; to more elevated forms of political and scientific writing by such authors as Francis Bacon and King James; to some of the most important religious works in Renaissance England, including sermons, prayer books, treatises, and various translations of the Bible and Psalms. Finally, this course will involve hands-on research in Ohio State’s Rare Books Library as we investigate the production and material history of popular books in Renaissance England. Course requirements include curiosity, creativity, several research exercises, a longer final essay, several quizzes and active participation.

English 4535: Special Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Culture —Literature of Slavery and Freedom during the Enlightenment
Instructor:
 Roxann Wheeler
This course will feature the ways that slavery and colonization shaped English literature, particularly the novel. Wrestling with the new information available about the world, writers during the time period 1660-1800, known as the Enlightenment, told a variety of stories about native Americans, Africans, and the hybrid populations of the Caribbean, many of whom were enslaved, and also told stories impersonating their perspectives critical of Britons. Students will read both the literature of Britons and the literature by former slaves and women of color. A cultural study of literature, we will also read recent theories about Enlightenment views of race, racism, and about the institution of slavery in Britain and the Caribbean sugar colonies.

English 4551: Special Topics in 19th-Century U.S. Literature — Social Reform and American Literature
Instructor: 
Elizabeth Hewitt
The nineteenth century was a period in United States history that saw an explosion of social reform projects – practical experiments and theoretical investigations designed to make the world happier, healthier, safer, and more equitable. However, it was also a period in which chattel slavery was legal and that saw rising social inequities as the American population grew larger and more diverse. In our course, we will focus on the literature of these social reform projects: women’s suffrage, abolitionism, temperance, worker’s rights, immigrant rights, agrarianism, sexual liberation, prison reform, and financial reform. Authors will include David Walker, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Rebecca Harding Davis, Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne, T.S. Arthur, Ida B. Wells, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Frank Norris, Jacob Riis, Helen Hunt Jackson and Sutton Griggs. 

English 4553: Twentieth-Century U.S. Fiction
Instructor: 
Jessica Prinz
A study of American fiction after 1914, with emphasis on such major figures as Anderson, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and Faulkner.

English 4559: Introduction to Narrative and Narrative Theory
Instructor: 
Brian McHale
“Narrative” is a current buzzword and a catch-all term— everything is narrative nowadays!  However, it is also one of the principle means of organizing experience in everyday life and conversation, popular culture and literary works. This course introduces students to the basic concepts and tools of “classical” narrative theory and analysis, in four general areas: the underlying structure of story; the reordering of story-events in the plot; the production of a story-world (narrative time and space); and the representation of selves (narrators, speakers, perceivers, minds).  We will study a selection of classic essays in narrative theory, and we will read and analyze a variety of mainly literary narrative – fairy tales, short stories, novels, one graphic narrative and at least one film.  We will also survey some of the developments in “post-classical” narrative theory, including rhetorical narrative theory, feminist and queer narratology and cognitive narrative theory.

English 4560: Special Topics in Poetry — The Experience of Poems
Instructor: 
Hannibal Hamlin
Dylan Thomas said that poetry was what made his toenails twinkle, Carl Sandburg that a poem was an echo asking a shadow dancer to be a partner, and Marianne Moore that poems were imaginary gardens with real toads in them. What are poems really, how do they work, and how should we read them? This course will focus on short, lyric poems in English from the middle ages to the present, exploring the different things poems do, the different forms they take and sounds they make, and the experience of reading them. We'll also try talking and writing about them. We'll read many poets, including William Shakespeare, John Donne, John Keats, Emily Dickinson, Gerard Manley Hopkins, E.E. Cummings, Elizabeth Bishop and Derek Walcott.

English 4564.02: Major Author in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century British Literature— Charles Dickens' Bleak House
Instructor: 
Jill Galvan
This course will center around one masterpiece novel, Charles Dickens’ Bleak House (serialized 1852-53). The class will have two main aims: to close-read a celebrated nineteenth-century work, and to think about literary genres as instruments of social critique—then and now. Bleak House is a work of satire; it uses humor to make biting observations about contemporary society. Additionally, as the title hints, this novel borrows from the Gothic, also for social criticism. Ominous secrets and settings help Dickens to comment on Victorian problems, including urban poverty, inadequate legal systems, and constraining gender norms. Ultimately, the course will turn to a few related texts: Hannah Crafts’ The Bondwoman’s Narrative, a nineteenth-century American slave narrative that draws on Bleak House; and three recent films, It Follows (2014), Mudbound (2017), and Get Out (2017), all of which contain some form of the Gothic, and the last of which is also a satire. Through this juxtaposition, students will ask how socially critical fictions change over time, and how they deploy genre in different ways. What new objects of cultural horror do modern Gothic stories unearth? How does satire today differ from nineteenth-century satire, reflecting new priorities, values, injustices, etc.? Tentative requirements: engaged participation; frequent reading quizzes; five or six short analytical response papers (1-2 pp. each); and one longer term paper (5-7 pp.).

English 4565: Advanced Fiction Writing
Instructor:
 Lee Martin
This is an advanced workshop in which students will write and critique original fiction. Each student will produce two pieces of fiction, either short stories or excerpts from novels, and will significantly revise one of them to present at the end of the semester.

English 4566: Advanced Poetry Writing
Instructor: 
Marcus Jackson
Advanced workshop in the writing of poetry. This is a class for serious students of creative writing. Admission is by portfolio submission to the instructor.

English 4568: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor: 
Elissa Washuta
Advanced workshop in the writing of creative nonfiction. This is a class for serious students of creative writing. Admission is by portfolio submission to the instructor.

English 4569—Digital Media and English Studies
Instructor:
 John Jones
Have you ever wondered what your voice-activated speakers are saying about you after you’ve left the room? Did you know that your Fitbit was a published author? In this course, students will explore how digital culture enables physical objects to argue, both in the production of new genres of written text and in their interactions with people and the environment. We will explore the rhetorical possibilities of emerging interfaces such as voice control, paying particular attention to the new forms of digital creativity they are enabling as well as to how the data they produce are impacting privacy and security. In order to do so, we will not only analyze these objects but become makers ourselves, using tinkering as a way of thinking about new relations between people and the physical world that are enabled by our devices and the new forms of writing these relations can support. 

English 4572: Traditional Grammar and Usage
Instructor:
 Staff
An examination of terminology and structures traditionally associated with the study of English grammar and usage rules, especially problematic ones, governing edited written American English. 

English 4574: History and Theories of Writing — From Clay Tablets to Trump's Tweets
Instructor:
 Christa Teston
This class will explore how writing has evolved since premodern times to contemporary cultural practices.

English 4575: Special Topics in Literary Forms and Themes
Instructor:
 Angus Fletcher
Study of the origins, definitions, and development of writing, including historical, cultural, technological, theoretical and/or ideological issues. 

English 4577.02: Folklore II — Legend, Superstition and Folk Belief
Instructor:
 Merrill Kaplan
This course introduces students to legend, superstition and folk belief, genres that include reports of alien abductions, sightings of Slender Man, the sharing of fake news and that haunted house near where you grew up. Students will gain familiarity with traditions of several places and times while exploring the relationship between legend, belief and personal experience, and the nature of legend as contested truth. By the end of the course, students will have learned strategies for interpreting legend and rumor as meaningful expression. Written work will include a folklore collection project. Folklore Minor course. 

English 4578: Special Topics in Film — Films of the 1990s
Instructor: 
David Brewer
This course will investigate the film (mostly American) produced in the decade in which most Ohio State undergraduates were born, though you may not have then watched anything beyond Toy Story.  In so doing, we will consider what we gain by approaching films in relation to their chronological peers, rather than organizing them by genre or director.  The '90s saw the advent of "indie" film, the expansion of ways of watching movies outside of theaters and the increasing use of digital technology in filmmaking.  Likely assignments will include a viewing journal, a presentation and a series of short writing exercises.  Possible viewings include Pulp Fiction, The Silence of the Lambs, The Big Lebowski, Trainspotting, L.A. Confidential, American Beauty, The Incredibly True Adventures of Two Girls in Love, Chasing Amy, Crooklyn, Delicatessen, Chunking Express and Princess Mononoke.

English 4580: Special Topics in LGBTQ Literatures and Cultures — Historical Fictions, Speculative Futures
Instructor:
 Martin Ponce
This course examines twentieth- and twenty-first-century U.S. literary texts and films that explore “queer” pasts and futures. Which historical figures have LGBTQ writers and filmmakers invoked, reimagined, and represented? Whom have they claimed as their predecessors, ancestors, or antagonists? What historical moments and cultural contexts have they perceived and invoked as worthy of “queer” investigation and representation? Alternatively, what kinds of “queer” worlds, environments, and inhabitants have writers and filmmakers postulated in utopian and dystopian futures? Has queer life gotten better or worse? Possible authors and filmmakers include Samuel Delany, Cheryl Dunye, Thomas Glave, Isaac Julien, Larissa Lai, Mark Merlis, Joanna Russ, Monique Truong and Craig Womack.

English 4581: Special Topics in U.S. Ethnic Literatures 
Instructor:
 Pranav Jani
Study of selected issues or forms in U.S. ethnic literatures and cultures. Topic varies. Examples: Native American autobiography, Asian American poetry; Latino/a novel. 

English 4582: Special Topics in African-American Literature — Black Experiments 
Instructor:
 Martin Ponce
This course explores the innovative formal experiments that African American writers have invented and practiced across the twentieth century and into the twenty-first. Through historically contextualized readings of poetry, fiction, and literary nonfiction, we will consider such topics as the relations between the orality and literacy, music and writing, opacity and accessibility, traumatic pasts and speculative futures, radical art and radical politics, as well as the intersections among race, gender, sexuality, class, and location. Possible authors include Elizabeth Alexander, James Baldwin, Amiri Baraka, Octavia Butler, Samuel Delany, W.E.B. Du Bois, Henry Dumas, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Douglas Kearney, Audre Lorde, Nathaniel Mackey, Toni Morrison, Harryette Mullen, Claudia Rankine, Sonia Sanchez, Evie Shockley and Jean Toomer.

English 4583: Special Topics in World Literature in English — Afropolitans and Afropolitanism
Instructor: 
Adeleke Adeeko
Study of literatures written in English and produced outside of the U.S. and Britain; topics include colonial/postcolonial writing, regional literature, theoretical and historical approaches, genres.

English 4587 — Studies in Asian American Literature and Culture
Instructor:
 Jian Chen
Focuses on problems and themes in Asian American literature and culture from the late nineteenth century to the present. Topic varies. Examples: Asian American Literature and Popular Culture; Empire and Sexuality in Asian American Literature. Cross-listed in Comparative Studies 4803
*Combined section class

English 4590.01H: The Middle Ages
Instructor:
 Christopher Jones
Intensive study of the middle ages. 

English 4590.06H: The Modern Period —The Art of Anthropocene; or, An Unnatural History of Modernism
Instructor:
 Thomas Davis
For a long time we understood modernism as the art of the bustling metropolis, furious technological change, radical social developments, and the massive political crises that defined the first half of the 20th century.  This class investigates the various ways modernist cultures think through the changing relationships between human and nonhuman nature in the first half of the twentieth century.  We will examine the ways modernism interacted with ecology and environmental science, economic theories of growth, population expansion after World War II, fossil fuels and energy and transformations in geopolitics and empire.  Our archive of materials will be global and we will draw heavily from contemporary work in the Environmental Humanities.  Authors may include: H.G. Wells, Virginia Woolf, E.M. Forster, Jean Rhys, Amos Tutuola, the Italian Futurists, Anthony Burgess, early documentary cinema, Doris Lessing, J.G. Ballard and others.

English 4592: Special Topics in Women in Literature and Culture
Instructor:
 Roxann Wheeler
The class will combine recent feminist essays about women in regard to class and patriarchy as well as race and empire as a way to interpret fiction and non-fiction written by eighteenth-century women. As a rule, in this era which first saw an outpouring of commercial feminist writing, women wrote satirical, didactic, utopian and realistic fiction about women’s situations. Students will examine both the conservative and radical traditions of women’s writing. Two biographies will also anchor our readings and provide a rich cultural context for the literature: biographies about a famous elite woman and an actress.

English 4597.01: The Disability Experience in the Contemporary World
Instructor: 
Margaret Price
This course is organized around the question, What does it mean to “see” disability? We will begin with an examination of the common metaphor for disability awareness, “visibility,” moving from there to questions of staring, blindness, visual culture, and representation. We will investigate ways that disability is represented multimodally, and will create such multimodal compositions ourselves.

English 4597.02: American Regional Cultures in Transition — Appalachia, Louisiana  and the Texas Border Country
Instructor: 
Dorothy Noyes
This course will introduce you to the folklore of three American regions. Each is famous for its traditional culture, but each is often thought of as deviating in a distinctive way from the  national culture: Louisiana is “creole,” Texas is “border,” and Appalachia is “folk.” While exploring these differences, we’ll also observe the commonalities: positive and negative stereotyping from outside, complex racial and class composition, heavy in- and out-migration, environmental distinctiveness and stress, extraction economies, tense and often violent relationships with both government and business. We’ll look at historical change through the prism of celebrated folklore forms such as Louisiana Mardi Gras, Appalachian fairy tales, and the Tex-Mex corrido. We’ll also explore the impact of Hurricane Katrina and the reconstruction of the Gulf Coast, mountaintop-removal mining and the energy economy in Appalachia, and the cross-border trafficking of people, drugs, and capital.  A general question arises: what counts as America? Folklore Minor course.


5000-level

 

English 5191: Internship in English Studies — Promotional Media Internship
Instructor: 
Scott DeWitt
This internship opportunity will offer students experience in creating timely, relevant and compelling short-form promotional media (primarily video and audio) for the Department of English. Students will work closely with their supervisor as well as with key communications personnel to develop projects and set priorities and deadlines. English 5191, Promotional Media Internship, will be intensely hands-on and focus almost exclusively on digital media production and related work-management skills in professional settings. This internship site requires students to work both independently and collaboratively. This internship opportunity is especially applicable to English majors who would like to develop their digital media skills in a workplace setting and for those who have digital media skills with nowhere to apply them.  Students with digital media skills are encouraged to enroll.  However, media skills are NOT a pre-requisite; students will learn all media skills necessary for the class. (This internship does not fulfill the digital media requirement for the Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy concentration in the English Major.) ***Advanced undergraduate students are encouraged to enroll in 5000-level courses***

English 5194.01/.02: Group Studies — History of the Book in Modernity
Instructor:
 David Brewer
This pilot course will investigate books (and similar artifacts, such as periodicals) as physical objects and explore how they have functioned in the modern world--say, between 1830 and today.  The course will be completely embedded in Ohio State's Rare Books and Manuscripts Library and will culminate in a public exhibition of artifacts from our collections selected and curated by you.  Among the issues we'll consider are how books are made, how publication format shapes the ways in which books are read, the uses to which books can be put other than reading, and how books fare when other media (radio, film, the internet) emerge as potential rivals. So come explore objects ranging from serialized nineteenth-century novels to contemporary queer zines and learn how to judge a book by its cover in the most rigorous and far-reaching ways possible. ***Advanced undergraduate students are encouraged to enroll in 5000-level courses***

English 5710.01/02: Introduction to Old English Language and Literature
Instructor:
 Christopher Jones
Introduction to Old English language, followed by selected readings in Anglo-Saxon prose and verse texts. ***Advanced undergraduate students are encouraged to enroll in 5000-level courses***

Text

1000-level

 

English 1109: Intensive Writing and Reading
Instructor: 
Martha Sims
Provides intensive practice in integrating academic reading and writing. 

English 1110.01: First-Year English Composition
Instructor:
 Staff
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers. 
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01: First-Year English Composition — Writing for a Cause
Instructor: 
Jessie Male
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers. 
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01: First-Year English Composition — Capitalism and Identity
Instructor: 
Carlos Kelly
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers. 
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01: First-Year English Composition — Representations of Singlehood
Instructor:
 Eliza Smith
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers. 
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01: First-Year English Composition — Disaster Narratives
Instructor: 
Amanda Ingram
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers. 
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English-1110.01: First-Year English Composition — Book-to-Screen Adaptations
Instructor: 
Nicole Pizarro
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers. 
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English-1110.01: First-Year English Composition — Rhetorical Monsters and Monstrous Rhetoric
Instructor:
 Nicholas Hoffman
In a powerful narrative moment, the Monster that inhabits the pages of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein calls out to his creator (and to us as readers): “Who was I? What was I? Whence did I come? What was my destination?” (Chapter XXV). When we encounter images and descriptions of “monsters” we may be struck with the very same questions, and the matter of what defines a monster is consistently up for debate. Our primary goal in this course will be to explore and develop our analytical techniques in the writing of academic discourse. In achieving this goal, we will pay close attention not only to how we define monstrosity but also to how monsters are constructed and utilized in both text and image to various rhetorical ends. Depictions of monstrosity abound in historical texts and artwork as well as in contemporary film trailers, video games, and writing (both fictional and nonfictional), and participants will have the opportunity to develop their own research topics, ultimately crafting an argument for what is at stake in their chosen sources. All the while we will question where monsters reside in these texts, how they appeal to us as readers, and ultimately who creates or is made into a monster and for what purpose. 
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01H: Honors First-Year English Composition — Immigration & Ethnography
Instructor: 
Frank Donoghue
This course will examine in detail the process of writing a college-level paper or essay through the theme of immigration. We will read immigrants’ stories in their own words for each class and then discuss these readings in groups. We will also do some ethnographic exercises in the first weeks of class, both to give you practice writing but to also examine your experience of getting to Ohio State. After group discussion, we will regroup as a class for grammar and writing exercises. Grammar exercises are ungraded and are meant to strengthen your writing skills, not to impact your grade. Along with these exercises, we will cover how to write a paper or essay in a workshop format, working together on each step of the writing process. There will be a series of very short papers in the first month of the course, but the central writing assignment will be a research paper that students will develop over the course of the final two months of the semester. The required texts are Geraldine Woods’ English Grammar for Dummies (second edition), John Bowe’s Gig: Americans Talk About Their Jobs, David Mamet’s Glengarry Glen Ross, and excerpts from Paul Lauter, ed., Literature, Class and Culture. There will also be occasional supplements to these texts.
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.01H: Honors First-Year English Composition
Instructors: 
James Fredal and Daniel Seward
Provides intensive practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers. 
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.02: First-Year English Composition
Instructor:
Staff
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers. Taught with an emphasis on literary texts. 
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.03: First-Year English Composition — Meanings Behind Movie Posters
Instructor: 
Christiane Buuck
Intensive practice in fundamentals of expository writing illustrated in the student's own writing and essays of professional writers; offered in a small class setting and linked with an individual tutoring component in its concurrent course, ENGLISH-1193. This course is available for EM credit only through the AP program. 
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1110.03: First-Year English Composition — Belief and the Supernatural
Instructor: 
Martha Sims
Intensive practice in fundamentals of expository writing illustrated in the student's own writing and essays of professional writers; offered in a small class setting and linked with an individual tutoring component in its concurrent course, ENGLISH-1193. This course is available for EM credit only through the AP program. 
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English 1193: Individual Studies
Instructor:
 Martha Sims         
Intensive practice in the fundamentals of expository writing. 


2000-level

 

English 2202: Selected Works of British Literature — 1800 to Present
Instructor:
 Staff
An introductory critical study of the works of major British writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2202 (10): Selected Works of British Literature — 1800 to Present
Instructor: 
Jill Galvan
This course will introduce you to some of the major British texts, authors, and literary forms and trends of the last two centuries. In the process, you will be learning about diverse perspectives on important cultural developments over the past two centuries, including the French Revolution, the abolition of slavery, the Industrial Revolution, imperialism, debates over gender roles and sexuality, the rise of scientific values, the twentieth-century world wars and decolonization. We will study major literary modes such as the Romantic lyric, the Gothic novel, the dramatic monologue, World War I poetry, postcolonial narrative, and the Bildungsroman (or "coming-of-age novel"). Our fiction and drama will include Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol, Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest and Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2202H: Selected Works of British Literature — 1800 to Present
Instructor: 
David Riede
We will be looking at some of the greatest and most influential works of English literature from William Blake's "Songs of Innocence" (1789) to Zadie Smith's "White Teeth" (2000). We will study the works in terms of historical and cultural context and of literary craft, and will look particularly to distinguish the Romantic, Victorian, Modern and post-colonial periods. 
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2220: Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructors: 
Christopher Highley and staff
Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience. 
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2220: Introduction to Shakespeare — Reading Shakes in Performance
Instructors: 
Manuel Jacquez
Although they are more often read as books today, Shakespeare’s dramatic works were initially viewed and interpreted as plays performed on a stage. In this class, we will read a handful of plays: Richard II, A Midsummer Night’s DreamThe Merry Wives of WindsorMacbeth, Othello and The Tempest. These plays all engage modern topics ranging from the acquisition of political power to assumptions about gender. We will consider how the medium of performance informed Shakespeare’s exploration of these topics. As you learn about Shakespeare’s London, his dramatic worlds and the performance practices that materialized them, you will hone your ability to think, read and write critically.

English 2220: Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructors: 
Jennifer Higginbotham
In late sixteenth-century London, on the south bank of the Thames, amongst bear--baiting rings and brothels stood a round wooden theater that brought together people from all walks of life-aristocrats and merchants, cobblers and tailors, seamstresses and fishwives. It was for this space and for these people that William Shakespeare first wrote his influential plays, and in this course, we'll be imagining what it was like to stand with them and watch Shakespeare's theater in action. This particular section of Introduction to Shakespeare will be experimenting on occasion with cutting edge techniques for facilitating embodied learning through the combination of rehearsal room techniques modeled on professional theater companies with close textual analysis of Shakespeare's language. Our in-depth exploration will include comedies, tragedies and a few of his poems,  not to mention a lot of fun along the way.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2220H: Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructor: 
Alan Farmer
In this course we will read several plays written by Shakespeare and consider how they both conform to and work against the genres of comedy, tragedy, history, and romance. Looking at the plays as works to be both performed and read, we will pay particular attention to the politics of gender, religion and kingship in the plays, topics that Shakespeare returned to again and again and that were vitally important, and indeed controversial, in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. In addition to some critical and historical essays on the early modern theater and culture, we will read some combination of the following plays: Henry V, Two Gentlement of Verona, The Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, Much Ado About Nothing, Othello, Macbeth, Julius Caesar, Coriolanus, The Tempest and The Winter's Tale.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

English 2260: Introduction to Poetry
Instructor: 
Staff 
*This course is intended as an introduction to major poems and poets in the English language and will examine poems in historical, literary-historical and broader cultural contexts. We will be concerned especially with poetic form and craft and the many and various uses of such forms as sonnets, ballads, odes, blank and rhymed verse and so on, and we will also focus on the crafting of voice, tone, imagery, sound and rhythm. 
GE: Literature

English 2260 (30): Introduction to Poetry — Love, Eroticism and Renaissance Poetry
Instructor:
 Benjamin Moran
In this iteration of "Introduction to Poetry," we will explore a seemingly narrow selection of verse: the love and erotic poetry of the English Renaissance (1500-1700). These parameters will, however, lead us to encounter what is considered some of the greatest poetry ever written, including William Shakespeare's Sonnets, John Milton'sParadise Lost, the lyrics of John Donne and George Herbert, as well as poems by lesser known writers like Aemelia Lanyer and and Mary Wroth. As we read this remarkably diverse writing, we will learn about the formal qualities of these poems while also reading them for their varied expressions of love, sex, desire and emotion. Often challenging, often weird, but always sexy, the poetry of this course will prove an exciting introduction to the study of verse. 
GE: Literature

English 2260H: Introduction to Poetry
Instructor: 
David Riede 
This course is intended as an introduction to major poems and poets in the English language, and will examine poems in historical, literary historical and broader cultural contexts. We will be concerned especially with poetic form and craft and the many and various uses of such forms as sonnets, ballads, odes, blank and rhymed verse and so on, and we will also focus on the crafting of voice, tone, imagery, sound and rhythm.
GE: Literature

English 2261: Introduction to Fiction
Instructors: 
Roxann Wheeler and staff
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included. 
GE: Literature

English 2261 (20): Introduction to Fiction
Instructors: 
David Brewer
This course will examine the central building blocks of fiction:  plot, character, narration/point of view, and setting.  We'll also explore how style connects with and contributes to these various building blocks. Our emphasis throughout will be on how fiction works and why we should care about its workings. Likely readings include Donna Tartt's The Secret History, Gillian Flynn's Gone Girl, Truman Capote's In Cold Blood, Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and a range of short stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, Lee K. Abbott, Donald Ray Pollock, Flannery O'Connor, Shirley Jackson, James Thurber, Viet Thanh Nguyen, H. P. Lovecraft, and Claire Vaye Watkins. Likely assignments include a weekly reading journal, four short descriptions of how our building blocks work in a passage from our readings, and your choice of a short paper on how the style of one of our authors connects to these building blocks OR a short piece of fiction with commentary on how you're approaching our building blocks
GE: Literature

English 2261 (30): Introduction to Fiction
Instructors: 
Zoe Thompson
This course begins with the assumption that fictions are at the heart of human existence, that stories are our way of making sense of the world. Tracing the novel from the nineteenth century to today, the course explores the stories we tell ourselves about love, identity and sexuality, covering some of the greatest books of all time from The Great Gatsby to Gone Girl.
GE: Literature

English 2263: Introduction to Film
Instructor: 
Staff
Introduction to methods of reading film texts by analyzing cinema as technique, as system and as cultural product. 
GE: VPA

English 2263 (10): Introduction to Film
Instructor: 
David Brewer
This course will explore the formal and technological means through which stories are told on film, and how those techniques interact with the film industry and the viewers on which it relies.  Among other things, we'll consider cinematography, editing, mise-en-scene, sound, genre, distribution, exhibition venues, and the star system. Throughout, our emphasis will be on bringing out and building upon the skills as a viewer that you've already developed over two decades or more of watching. Likely viewing will include Some Like It Hot, The Silence of the Lambs, The Palm Beach Story, Kick-Ass, Rope, Moonrise Kingdom, Singin' in the Rain, Dazed and Confused, Star Wars, Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, High Society, something quite recent and internationally successful, and a documentary (The Story of Film), along with a wide range of clips.
GE: VPA

English 2264: Introduction to Popular Culture Studies
Instructor: 
Staff
Introduction to the analysis of popular culture texts. 
GE: Cultures & Ideas
*This is a combined section class

English 2265: Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructors:
 Rachel ToliverElizabeth BlackfordTyler Sones and Jessica Rafalko
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.

English 2266: Introductory Poetry Writing
Instructors:
 Margaret Cipriano and Babette Cieskowski
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, composition, and prosody; practice in the writing of poetry; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published poems by established poets.

English 2267: Introduction to Creative Writing
Instructor: 
Allison Talbot
An introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction. Analysis and discussion of student work, with reference to the general methods and scope of all three genres. 

English 2268: Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor:
 Steffan Hruby
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, and composition; practice in the writing of creative nonfiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published essays by masters of the many forms of creative nonfiction.

English 2269: Digital Media Composing
Instructor: 
Staff
A composition course in which students analyze and compose digital media texts while studying complex forms and practices of textual production. 
GE: VPA

English 2270: Introduction to Folklore
Instructor: 
Staff
Folklore theory and methods explored through engagement with primary sources: folktale, legend, jokes, folksong, festival, belief, art. Folklore Minor course.
GE: Cultures & Ideas
*This is a combined section class

English 2276: Arts of Persuasion — Cultural Rhetorics
Instructor: 
Gavin Johnson
Rhetoric is cultural and culture is rhetorical. In this course, we will explore and practice the arts of persuasion by learning about frameworks for both analyzing and producing arguments for different media, audiences and cultures. Through assigned readings and “real world” examples, the course will introduce students to classical and contemporary rhetoric, cultural rhetorics and digital and multimodal rhetorics. Students will produce a final critical-creative project on a topic of their choice in consultation with the instructor.
GE: Cultures & Ideas
*Professional Writing Minor Requirement or Elective

English 2277: Introduction to Disability Studies (online)
Instructor: 
Jessie Male
This on-line course investigates the ways that disability is composed in contemporary life. We’ll think about disabled people in terms of identity and culture, but we’ll also think about the way disability itself functions to shape our ideas about ourselves, and others. What does it mean when you taste food and say, “That’s crazy good”? What does it mean when you break your ankle and spend a few months using crutches?  Our purpose is not to say, “This way of speaking or behaving is good, and that other way of speaking or behaving is bad.” Rather, our purpose is to ask, over and over again: How does disability make meaning in contemporary life?  We will explore various models of disability, paying attention to the ways that each model intersects with race, gender, class, and sexuality. We’ll theorize concepts such as normal, passing, inspiration, and access, and consider how these concepts both emerge and are contested through individual authors’ and artists’ composing practices. 
GE: Cultures & Ideas

English 2280: The Bible as Literature
Instructor:
 Bethany Christiansen
In this class, students will approach the Bible as a literary text, rather than as a religious text, though naturally, the theological and the spiritual will be part of the discussions. This is not a course in religion, but in literature, and particularly, on the interpretation of the Bible through history. The Jewish and Christian scriptures contained in the Bible, in various forms, are perhaps the most important writings of the Western world. Students will examine how the texts included in the Bible came to be as historical artefacts, and will analyze the wild and wonderful stories it contains as fundamental to western literary and cultural heritage. The objectives of this course are for students to gain an understanding of Biblical literary forms (poetry, mythology, eyewitness testimony), and an understanding of the Bible as interpretable through the ages (spanning from Jewish biblical commentaries through biblical literalists of the present-day US). Assignments seek to engage students in analysis of Biblical interpretations, and include a film review and an essay on an aspect of Biblical translation, and culminating in a creative project. 

English 2281: Introduction to African-American Literature
Instructor: 
Martin Ponce
This course introduces students to the major periods and authors of the African American literary tradition from the colonial period to our contemporary moment. In this survey, we will read texts in a wide range of genres (poetry, autobiographies, novels, short stories, nonfiction essays) that engage with an equally broad array of topics and issues, including slavery and freedom, orality and literacy, music and literature, gender and sexuality, political protest and artistic innovation and the persistence of structural racism and racial violence into the present. We will examine literature from the period of chattel slavery in the Americas, through Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, the Harlem Renaissance, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Black Arts Movement, postmodernism and the contemporary.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
*This is a combined lecture class

English 2282: Introduction to Queer Studies — Queer & Trans Cultures and Movements
Instructors:
 Jian Chen
This course explores queer and trans politics from the emergence of counter-cultural protest, critique, and community building in the late 1960s to the networked and embedded practices, relationships, and identities of the first decades of the twenty-first century. As a derogatory term turned back against those using it, queer has been claimed as a perversely “negative” descriptive that rejects common-sense ideas of heterosexual (and sometimes gender) normality, while also creating different ways of desiring, relating, and being in the world. The course tracks the shifting social conditions that continue to energize queer dis-identification and ways of living as political strategies that work through cultural transformation. At the same time, the course resists reactionary tides of white cis-hetero-patriarchal fundamentalism and lesbian and gay liberal (homo)nationalism to focus on the racially, colonially, and economically dispossessed and gender nonconforming origins of queer politics. The second half of the course will focus on the embodied struggles and cultural and political strategies of trans communities, especially trans people of color. Trans struggles and practices will be considered both emerging and foundational in relationship to the past, present, and future of queer politics.
GE: Cultures & Ideas
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
*This is a combined section class

English 2367.01: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience
Instructors: 
Martha Sims and staff
Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America. 
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

English 2367.01 (120): Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience
Instructors:
 Edgar Singleton
As students at The Ohio State University, you encounter on a daily basis people who do not share your particular racial identity, national or ethnic background, language, gender, social class, or other characteristics of your identity.  As you can see in the GE expectations for this course, it will be a place for examination of this remarkable diversity in the context of the U.S. experience. To that end, we will be reading, writing, and thinking about diversity as we explore how the country has (and is currently being) shaped by the wide range of people who live and work here. In addition, in light of the current national conversation about immigration, we will explore the very notion of what it means to be a citizen of any country. How does the US determine who is and who is not a citizen? Through reading, discussion, and writing, you will pose questions about an aspect of citizenship that will develop into a researched essay and presentation over the course of the semester.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

English 2367.01H: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience
Instructor: 
Nancy Johnson and staff
Extends and refines expository writing & analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America. 
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

English 2367.01S: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience — Literacy Narratives of Black Columbus
Instructor: 
Beverly Moss
Participants in this course will read about the importance of undertaking life-history and literacy narrative projects, with a particular focus on preserving the history of Columbus-area Black communities.  Collecting (and analyzing) literacy narratives-or literacy stories-is an important research strategy that can be used to document the history and current activities of any community.  It is especially important in Black communities where their/our literacy practices have often been under-reported or negatively characterized.  Collecting literacy narratives also provides an opportunity for community members to have a voice in telling their stories.  In this course-which welcomes community members and volunteers-students will learn about collecting and preserving the life-history narratives of Black Columbus, focusing specifically on stories having to do with literacy practices occurring in the Black business and activist communities. Some of the questions that we will explore this semester are what literacy practices do black business owners and/or activists from a variety of fields engage in as part of their work?  What specialized literacy practices did the community members acquire to enter into their specific line of work or community activism?  What is the relationship between their everyday literacy practices and their work-related literacy practices?  What is the relationship between school-based literacy practices and their community-based literacy practices?  What kind of reading and writing do they do?  How do they use technology? Class members will learn about interviewing techniques, view/listen to life history/literacy narrative recordings, and reflect on such texts as a medium of social activism.  Participants will also learn how to use digital audio recorders, digital still cameras, and digital video cameras to record the stories of research participants in Black Columbus, and all participants will conduct a series of life-history/literacy narrative interviews with members of the community.   You will work in groups to identify people and sites for collecting literacy narratives.  Guest speakers who have participated in similar projects will also be invited to speak to the class.  The course will culminate in a public reception at which each group?s final project will be shown.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

English 2367.02: Literature in the U.S. Experience
Instructor: 
Jennifer PattonAdeleke Adeeko and staff
To improve students’ analytical reading, writing, thinking, and research skills, this course focuses on creative nonfiction published in the Best American series—essays that reflect the experiences of and issues concerning people living in the United States. Because English 2367.02 is a writing course—and necessarily also a reading course—students can expect to build on the skills they learned in their first-year writing course to improve composition, analysis, logical construction of arguments, use of evidence, and cohesion. The class gives students the opportunity to deepen their thinking about their selected topic through in-class writing exercises, class discussions, and peer review. At the end of the term, students will verbally present their research during our in-class Colloquium.
GE: Literature
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

English 2367.02 (110): Literature in the U.S. Experience — Canonical Works:  The "Great" Literary Tradition
Instructors: 
Jessica Prinz
All sessions of English 2367 have the same subject: diversity in U.S. Literature. This class has not only a subject but also a thesis. While the up-to-date concern for  diversity would seem apt for new forms of literature and contemporary modes of art, I will argue that diversity has always been a subject for Twentieth-Century U.S. authors. Such "canonical" works (those texts deemed to be part of the "great" tradition)  have always treated the theme of diversity. Thus, such writers like Hemingway and Faulkner, Morrison and Ellison all address the diverse nature of life in the U.S. This quarter we?ll see some of the following: ethnic diversity (African-American, Native American, Asian American, and  Jewish); literature about disabilities (injured veterans; blindness, autism, depression; alcoholism); the insane and the temporarily insane; the victims of racism, prejudice, and violence. Many works also consider traditionally denigrated groups, like women and homosexuals. The conclusion here is  that such diversity in literature (as in life) calls for a good deal of tolerance and compassion, and  it exercises our capacity for empathy and understanding.
GE: Literature
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

English 2367.02: Literature in the U.S. Experience
Instructor: 
Pranav Jani
Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

English 2367.03: Documentary in the U.S. Experience
Instructor:
 Staff
An intermediate course that extends and refines skills in critical reading and expository writing through analysis of written texts, video and documentaries. 
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)

English 2367.03: Documentary in the U.S. Experience — The Rhetoric of Documentary Filmmaking
Instructor:
 Roger Cherry
We will watch several film documentaries, examining the rhetorial strategies employed by the filmmakers. The class focuses on rhetorical analysis and persuasive writing and employs a discussion format for discussing course readings and documentaries. 
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)

English 2367.05: The U.S. Folk Experience
Instructor:
 Staff
Concepts of American folklore and ethnography; folk groups, tradition, and fieldwork methodology; how these contribute to the development of critical reading, writing and thinking skills. 
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)

English 2463: Introduction to Video Games Analysis
Instructor: 
Staff
An introduction to humanities-based methods of analyzing and interpreting video games in terms of form, genre, style and theory. No background in video game play is necessary. All students will have regular opportunities for hands-on experience with different game types and genres in both the computer-based classroom and the Department of English Video Game Lab.
GE: VPA


3000-level

 

English 3271 (10): Structure of the English Language
Instructor: Gabriella Modan
This course is an introduction to English linguistics. We will learn about the basic characteristics of language: the sounds of English and how they're put together, word formation processes, and rules for combining words into utterances/sentences.  While studying how the basic building blocks of language work, we will also investigate linguistic variation, accents of American English, and language and education.  Finally, we'll explore how standard and non-standard varieties of English get evaluated in the US, and the implications of such evaluations in educational settings.
GE: Cultures & Ideas

English 3271 (20): Structure of the English Language
Instructor: 
Lauren Squires
Students learn basic characteristics of English linguistics focusing on the basic building blocks of language; the sounds of English and how they are put together, word formation processes, and rules for combining words into utterances/sentences. Students investigate and explore linguistic variation, accents of American English, and the implications of language evaluation in educational settings.
GE: Cultures & Ideas

English 3304: Business and Professional Writing
Instructor: Christiane Buuck and Staff
The study of principles and practices of business and professional writing.

English 3304: Business and Professional Writing — Principles and Practices
Instructor: 
Michael Blancato
In this course you will learn principles and practices associated with writing well in business and professional contexts. I’ll provide you with a feedback on your prose and give you several opportunities to refine your style, organization and collaborative writing strategies. Most of our in-class time will involve workshopping course deliverables and writing collaboratively.

English 3304: Business and Professional Writing
Instructor:
 Christa Teston
In this course you will learn principles and practices associated with writing well in business and professional contexts. I’ll provide you with a lot of feedback on your prose and give you several opportunities to refine your style, organization, and collaborative writing strategies. Most of our in-class time will involve workshopping course deliverables and writing collaboratively. At the end of this course, you will have writing samples that demonstrate expertise with the following genres, 

  • correspondence genres (letters, memos, social media); 
  • presentation genres (pitches, pecha kucha, slideware); 
  • collaboration genres (charter document, strategic plan); 
  • information genres (reports, documentation, public service announcements, fact sheets); 
  • proposal genres (project proposals, marketing proposals); 
  • employment search genres (resume, cover letter, interview techniques)

Research suggests that the best way to learn how to write professionally is to practice composing for meaningful, real world contexts, audiences, and purposes. In this class, therefore, you will practice rhetorically sound, professional writing by partnering with a real world client. You will have an opportunity to meet this client’s marketing and communication needs while negotiating budgetary and time constraints. 

English 3305: Technical Writing
Instructor: Staff
Study of principles and practices of technical writing. Emphasis on the style, organization, and conventions of technical and research reports, proposals, memoranda, professional correspondence, etc.

English 3331: Thinking Theoretically
Instructor: 
Sandra MacPherson
This course will introduce students to theoretical work on the Anthropocene—a new geologic epoch characterized by the catastrophic effects of human action on the Earth’s ecosystems. There is as yet no agreed upon origin point for the Anthropocene: scholars and scientists point to the Industrial Revolution (c. 1760), to the transoceanic movement of species during the colonization of the Americas (c. 1610), and to the “Great Acceleration” (c.1950), that is, expansions in human population, the development of novel materials (plastics!), and fallout from nuclear bomb testing following WWII. There are also a number of disciplinary approaches to the problem of climate change, and over the course of the semester we will survey the different modes of theoretical thinking that go along with them: natural history, multispecies ethnography, social history, ecological theory, popular journalism, anthropology, climate change activism, and of course, art. We will consider the cultural objects of the Anthropocene from the seventeenth century to the present, asking how art itself ‘thinks theoretically,’ and what genres and forms of human making might work to conceptualize the end of human existence.

English 3361: Narrative and Medicine
Instructor: Jared Gardner
Study of fictional and nonfictional narratives offering diverse perspectives on such medical issues as illness, aging, treatment, health and healing, and doctor-patient relationships. 
GE: Literature

English 3364: Special Topics in Popular Culture — History of the Comic Book in the U.S., 1933-2017
Instructor: Jared Gardner
This class will examine the history of periodical comics in the U.S, from the rise of the modern comic book form in the 1930s (and its immediate predecessors) to the underground comix revolution of the 1960s to the mini-comics and self-publishing movements of the 80s and 90s, to the transformations in American comics in the 21-century following the "Comics Crash" of the 1990s and the coming of the digital revolution. This class will focus as well on a wide range of genres, including superhero, crime, horror, and romance - as well as autobiographical, historical, educational and political comics. 
GE: Cultures & Ideas

English 3372: Science Fiction and/or Fantasy
Instructor:
 Elizabeth Hewitt and Staff
Stories about the end of the world have circulated for just as long as there have been stories. But authors became increasingly likely to write post-apocalyptic fiction in the aftermath of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, and these narratives have only become more popular in the 21st century with the urgency of climate change. This course will study some of the most influential post-apocalyptic fiction published between 1945 and 2013. Likely texts will include: Miller’s A Canticle for Leibowitz, Ballard’s The Drowned World, Disch’s The Genocides, LeGuin’s Lathe of Heaven, Butler’s Parable of the Sower, Atwood’s Oryx and Crake, McCarthy’s The Road and Lee’s On Such a Full Sea. We will consider the ways these speculative texts provide commentary on human catastrophe, natural crisis and social devolution. We will ask what difference the details make when authors construct their own versions of this archetypal plot? What can this particular subgenre of science fiction tell us about purposes of literary speculation? 
GE: Literature

English 3372 (30): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy — Tolkien's Monsters
Instructor: Merrill Kaplan
Tolkien`s bestiary of wights, wargs, balrogs, and nazguls is half the fun of his books. Add the "races" of elves, dwarves, hobbits, orcs, and men and there is a lot to talk about. What is a monster and what do monsters mean? What are the relationships between Tolkien`s monsters and the elves, dragons, and trolls of folklore and medieval epic? How have Tolkien`s ideas about race affected subsequent fantasy literature and games? In looking at monsters, we`ll examine the boundaries of the human and explore the violent language of dehumanization. We`ll hew to the books, not the movies, and readings will include the Hobbit, the Lord of the Rings trilogy, Tolkien`s essay "The Monsters and the Critics," modern theoretical works on monstrosity and about race, and comparative texts from folklore and medieval literature.
GE: Literature

English 3378: Special Topics in Film and Literature — Shakespeare and Film
Instructor: Alan Farmer
In this course, we will study some of the most innovative and influential films ever made of Shakespeare's plays.  We will read specific plays and view films that cut across dramatic genres, time periods, countries, and cinematic styles, by such directors as Max Reinhardt (Austria and Germany), Laurence Olivier (England), Akira Kurosawa (Japan), Baz Luhrmann (Australia), Michael Almereyda (U.S.), Al Pacino (U.S.), and Julie Taymor (U.S.). We will focus on how directors and actors have chosen to adapt Shakespeare for performance, but also consider how these films have shaped, and continue to shape, the cultural meaning of "Shakespeare" for modern audiences.  
GE: Cultures & Ideas

English 3379: Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy
Instructor: Nancy Johnson
Introduction to the interrelated fields of Writing, Rhetoric, and Literacy, familiarizing students with key concepts that underlie work in these interrelated fields and to the scholarly methods of WRL. Together, this discipline studies the ways people use language and other symbols to convey messages, persuade audiences, and create meaning, and how these practices are learned and taught. 

English 3398 (20): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor: Jessica Prinz
The purpose of this course is to read broadly in the history of American and British literature with the goal of improving reading and writing skills. All key genres of literature will be considered (fiction, drama, and poetry). We will also devote a significant portion of the class to the various theories used to analyze literature ("critical theory"). 

English 3398 (30): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor: 
Leslie Lockett
English 3398 is about developing arguments that speak to an academic audience beyond the classroom. This course is designed to build the skills needed for the advanced study of literature, especially the close reading of literary texts, familiarity with various genres of literature, the use of literary-critical methods and other scholars' research in developing one's analysis of texts, and the construction of clear and insightful essays about literature. We will practice several approaches to literary criticism, from close reading and historicist criticism to ecocriticism, deconstruction, and psychological criticism. We will study texts from across several literary genres, including poems, short stories, drama, and the novel.

English 3398 (40): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor: 
Jennifer Higginbotham
This is a course about what we read, why we read, and how we read. As an introduction to the critical study of literature, this class aims to help students gain the skills necessary to succeed as English majors and minors, including close reading, understanding genre, working with poetry, and writing English essays.

English 3398 (60): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
 Elizabeth Hewitt
This course's purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing. 

English 3398 (70): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
 Sandra MacPherson
This course's purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing. 

English 3405 (10) : Special Topics in Professional Communication — Technical Editing
Instructor:
 Jonathan Buehl
This course will introduce students to a continuum of technical editing practices: developmental editing, comprehensive editing, focused editing (for style, structure, design, etc.), copyediting, and proofreading. Through individual and collaborative projects, you will learn editing and publication-management strategies, and you will apply these strategies in both print and electronic publishing contexts. We will also discuss the ethical and legal aspects of technical editing and the social and organizational factors that affect editorial practices. 

English 3465 (10): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing — Toward a Single and Unique Effect 
Instructor:  David Bukspan 
The primary challenge in writing fiction, much more than filling a page, is making choices. It’s about asking the right questions and exploring different answers. But how to know what questions to ask, let alone how to answer? Edgar Allan Poe wrote that every aspect of a short story should be somehow contributing to “a single and unique effect.” Every word, every image, every detail about the characters and the setting and the plot should be chosen to help create a particular result. So okay, maybe “every” is a pretty tall order, but you get the idea. Fiction is a big sea, with all kinds of weird animals below the vast surface. In your Introduction to Fiction Writing, if not earlier, you started wading into the water, hopefully beginning to recognize how the elements of plot and point of view and character and setting and style and so on work together, impacting one another. Pushing this metaphor a little further, you can think of this class as dive boat, and each week we’ll look around. We’ll use The Anchor Book of New American Short Stories, an anthology of noteworthy recent domestic short fiction, as more of a net than an anchor, having a look at samples of the state of the art. We can think of Rust Hill’s Writing in General and the Short Story in Particular then as part field guide, part instruction manual. It will teach us not only to recognize how the stories we read work, but how we, too, can learn to swim better, move through the waters with more confidence and success.

English 3465 (20): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing — Journeys Elsewhere: Travelers, Expats and Other Roamers in Fiction
Instructor: 
 Mallory Laurel
A close study of stories about characters in foreign places, with a focus on the experiences of American travelers. We will read for technique while asking how these narratives use travel to address issues of identity and nationality, foreignness, home, culture, history, and language. Students will have the chance to explore these themes in their own writing through exercises and workshops during the semester. Readings may include: Leaving the Atocha Station by Ben Lerner, Motion Sickness by Lynne Tillman, Giovanni's Room by James Baldwin, Two Serious Ladiesby Jane Bowles, The Apartment by Greg Baxter, The Mosquito Coast by Paul Theroux and other selected writings. Additional narrative media may include Sofia Coppola's Lost in Translation.

English 3466: Special Topics in Intermediate Poetry Writing
Instructor: Jessica Lieberman
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing poetry. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.

English 3467S: Issues and Methods in Tutoring Writing
Instructor: Genie Giaimo
This course trains students to be effective tutors in the OSU Writing Center or within the Writing Associates Program, which includes learning and applying strategies for working with writers of all levels and writing at all stages of completion and comprehension. Through observation-work, students will learn about the day-to-day activities of a University Writing Center, and how tutors conduct themselves during their sessions with clients. Additionally, we will discuss different strategies that will help tutors as they work with English Language Learners. Students will also be trained in face-to-face and online tutoring methods, as well as individual and group tutoring methods.  Ultimately, this course should help students to feel more confident in their roles as writing consultants, and will shed insight into consulting strategies. This course is discussion-based and aims to engage students' areas of interest and expertise to the formal study of writing, literacy, and writing centers. This course will offer training in research methods and data analysis and will use the Writing Center as a research space, with a hands-on practical learning component that includes observation, supervised tutoring and, ultimately concludes with employment opportunities at the OSU Writing Center or within the Writing Associates Program. 

English 3468: Special Topics in Intermediate Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor: Elizabeth Rose-Cohen
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing creative nonfiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.

English 3662: An Introduction to Literary Publishing
Instructor: Jacob Scheier-Schwartz
An introduction to the theory and practice of editing and publishing literature. 


4000-level

 

English 4150: Cultures of Professional Writing
Instructors:
 Jennifer Patton and Daniel Seward
Examine writing in various workplaces. Analyze writing discourse that shapes professional organizations. Explore ongoing technological and cultural shifts required of workplace writers and the role of digital media. 

English 4189: Professional Writing Minor — Capstone Internship
Instructor: 
Jennifer Patton and Daniel Seward
Students work on-site in an organization doing writing-related work and meet weekly to discuss related topics.

English 4400: Literary Locations — Literary Dublin
Instructor:
 Sebastian Knowles
A unique opportunity to study the work of James Joyce and spend ten days walking in the footsteps of the novel itself in Dublin, Ireland, bringing the book to life.  We will also read the poetry of W. B. Yeats and visit the Lake Isle of Innisfree, the beautiful West Country, and the hills of Glendalough.  There will be a free day in Dublin.  No knowledge of Joyce, Yeats or Irish literature required.  Open competitively to all majors - a maximum of eighteen students will be accepted. Study of sites of literary importance and texts connected with them in the British Isles, Ireland and elsewhere. Concludes with ten-day visit to location. Taught in conjunction with English 5797. 

English 4515: Chaucer
Instructor: 
Karen Winstead
We will read Chaucer’s magnum opusThe Canterbury Tales, which “records” the stories told by pilgrims en route to the shrine of Saint Thomas Becket at Canterbury Cathedral.  The storytelling pilgrims represent a cross-section of medieval society, including aristocrats, entrepreneurs, professionals and officers of the Church.  The stories they tell range from romances to raunchy fabliaux, saints’ legends to beast fables.  Indeed, The Canterbury Tales includes some of the finest examples of all the major literary genres of the late Middle Ages.  Honor, death, feminism, friendship, marriage, domestic violence, morality and true love are hotly debated by Chaucer’s motley crew, whose sparring elucidates the complex world of social strivings, aspirations and anxieties that Chaucer inhabited.   

English 4520.01: Shakespeare
Instructor:
 Hannibal Hamlin
"The remarkable thing about Shakespeare is that he is really very good - in spite of all the people who say he is very good." - Robert Bridges, British Poet Laureate, 1913-1930. Our goal is simply to read, discuss and try as best as we can to enjoy and understand a sampling of the works of William Shakespeare, who for various complex reasons is the most widely read and influential writer in the history of the world (really). We'll work with the premise that the enjoyment depends upon the understanding. To this end, we'll focus a good deal on language, since that's the medium in which Shakespeare worked (his plays were staged, of course, but his theater was a far more verbal than visual medium, compared, say, to modern film). It's a commonplace that Shakespeare's "difficulty" lies in the changes in English over four centuries, but this is only partly true. Shakespeare's first audiences must have found his plays just as challenging as modern ones do, given his delight in coining new words, warping standard usage to suit his immediate dramatic needs, expressing himself in dense metaphorical puzzles and never using words in one sense when two, three or more are available. (We can call the last "punning," but only if we recognize that it's often vastly more than the lame joking normally so-called; for Shakespeare, the "pun" can be a figure of deep thought.) We'll read five plays: Henry IV, Part 1, The Merry Wives of Windsor, King Lear, Macbeth and The Winter's Tale and sample some of his non-dramatic poems.

English 4520.02: Special Topics in Shakespeare — The Merry Wives of Windsor
Instructor: 
Sarah Neville
This upper-level Special Topics in Shakespeare course is designed to give students an opportunity to explore the relationship between literary texts, criticism, and performance through the hands-on experience of working on a live Shakespeare production. Lord Denney's Players are producing Shakespeare’s The Merry Wives of Windsor in April 2018, and this section of ENGL 4520.02 will form the show’s backstage, promotions and front-of-house  team. 

English 4523: Special Topics in Renaissance Literature and Culture — Literature, Politics, and Religion in the Reign of Henry VIII
Instructor:
 Christopher Highley
This class surveys literary and cultural production during the reign of Henry VIII, paying special attention to representations of the king himself.  Henry VIII is possibly England's most notorious and recognizable ruler, enshrined in popular lore for marrying six times and beheading two of his wives.  But the significance of Henry and his reign reaches far beyond marital politics.  When Henry ascended the throne, England was a faithful Catholic country loyal to Rome and the pope; when Henry died, England had undergone a religious and cultural revolution, emerging as an independent nation-state with its own religion and imperial ambitions. To understand this unprecedented period of historic change, we will read selections from many different kinds of texts, including Henry's own letters and religious writings; selections from competing translations of the bible; court poetry by Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey and Sir Thomas Wyatt; drama by Shakespeare's precursors John Skelton and John Bale; historical chronicles by Edward Hall; and works of prose fiction like Thomas More's Utopia.  Readings and discussions will be organized by topics such as: humanism at Henry's court; war and diplomacy; courtly spectacle and chivalry; divorce and schism; resistance to Reformation; literature and the other arts; Henry's death and reputation. Finally, we will look at how Henry has been remembered over the last five centuries, especially in recent films, TV shows and fiction.

English 4540: Nineteenth-Century British Poetry
Instructor:
 Jill Galvan
This course covers British poetry written between 1789 and 1901, encompassing the Romantic and Victorian periods.  I’ll begin with some brief discussions of poetic elements and critical reading strategies, for those new to in-depth poetry analysis (or needing a refresher). (**You do not need to consider yourself fantastic at analyzing poetry to take this course! Part of my goal will be to help everyone become more confident approaching the genre by the end.) Authors will include William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Charlotte Smith, John Keats, Lord Byron, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, Christina Rossetti, A.C. Swinburne, Augusta Webster, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Mary Elizabeth Coleridge and Oscar Wilde. We will focus on these authors’ forms, styles and thematic concerns; at the same time, we will consider how their works respond to significant cultural/historical ideas and developments—for example, the French Revolution, abolitionism, ideas of the sublime, the “woman question” and debates about gender, momentous scientific discoveries, challenges to religious faith and burgeoning modern views about the value of art.  Students will also learn about important poetic forms (e.g., the ode, the sonnet, and the dramatic monologue), as well as about important literary modes and movements (e.g., the Gothic, the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and Aestheticism). 

English 4552: Special Topics in American Poetry through 1915 — American Poetry in "The Gilded Age": 1873-1898
Instructor: 
Elizabeth Renker
The tumultuous sociopolitical world of post-Civil War America has long been called "The Gilded Age," a time when robber barons, conflict between labor and capital, wealth inequality, massive economic shifts arising from large-scale industrialization, immigration, the nation's retrenchment from Civil Rights for freedmen, and other tumultuous social changes upended social and political life. Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner's 1873 novel of social critique, THE GILDED AGE: A TALE OF TODAY, sarcastically gave this period its name. Poetry was a very popular genre at this time, and reading, reciting, and sharing poems was a routine part of daily life - like music today.  We will study an array of poets, poems, and conversations in process in the newspapers and magazines in which these poems appeared, exploring how poetry participated in larger debates about current issues.  Poets will include some who are now well known (Paul Laurence Dunbar, Frances E.W. Harper, Sarah Piatt, Herman Melville, Stephen Crane, Edwin Arlington Robinson) and others who were well known in their own time but have been forgotten. We will also briefly discuss how and why commentators call our own era a "new Gilded Age." 

English 4553: Twentieth-Century U.S. Fiction — The Great 20th Century American Novel 
Instructor: 
Sebastian Knowles
Starting with Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, and Ralph Ellison, we will read books that aim to recover the American experience (The Nick Adams Stories, East of Eden, Invisible Man).  Turning to Tim O'Brien, Joseph Heller, and Toni Morrison, we will read books that open those first three books and turn them inside out (Going After Cacciato, Catch-22, Beloved).

English 4555: Rhetoric and Legal Argumentation
Instructor: 
James Fredal
We will examine legal arguments from the perspective of rhetoric. We'll read about rhetorical theories concerning things like narrative, deduction, analogy, emotion and organization, and we'll read some important legal cases: Supreme Court majority decisions, oral closing arguments and other legal texts to see how litigants persuade.

English 4563: Contemporary Literature — The Cultural Lives of Climate Change
Instructor: 
Thomas Davis
Scientists have long told us that climate change will reshape how we know and interact with our world.  There is no area of human life that is exempt from the effects of climate change: geopolitics, food security, biodiversity, social justice, energy production, economics, and urban planning to name but a few.  And yet, despite the overwhelming evidence to the ongoing changes to the Earth system, solutions and actions seem in short supply.  This class approaches climate change and its manifold problems through the cultural sphere.   We will pursue a few broad questions: first, what is the place of culture in comprehending and acting on climate change? Second, how might climate change and its attendant problems manifest differently across space and time? Third, what forms of knowledge and what kinds of interventions are generated by artworks, science fiction (cli-fi), creative non-fiction, documentaries, cinema, installation art, video games, and other cultural practices? Students will also have opportunities to interact with bioartist Brandon Ballengee, do voluntary field excursions, and engage in various forms of humanistic research into climate change.

English 4564.04: Major Author in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century British Literature — Bob Dylan
Instructor: 
Brian McHale
Surprisingly and controversially, the Swedish Academy bestowed the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature on Bob Dylan.  Everybody knows that Dylan is a pivotal figure in the history of American popular music, but is he a poet?  Are his writings literature?  Our course will explore these questions by reading Dylan's lyrics closely and intensively for their literary values.  It will be organized roughly chronologically, in four units: 1) Folk Dylan, 1961-64; 2) Electric Dylan, 1965-66; 3) After the Crash, 1967-78; 4) Born Again and the Endless Tour, 1979-2016.  Alongside Dylan's own lyrics we will read some of his precursors and literary models, sampling folk ballads and blues lyrics, literary ballads, the lyrics of Woody Guthrie, and poetry by Blake, Rimbaud, Eliot, Ginsberg, and his namesake, Dylan Thomas.  We will sample lyrics by some of his contemporaries, including Leonard Cohen, Lennon and McCartney, Joni Mitchell, and Paul Simon.  We will also view clips from key documentary and fictional films, including Pennebaker's Don't Look Back, Scorcese's No Direction Home, and Haynes's I'm Not There.

English 4565: Advanced Fiction Writing
Instructor: 
William White
Advanced workshop in the writing of fiction. This is a class for serious students of creative writing. Admission is by portfolio submission to the instructor.

English 4566: Advanced Poetry Writing
Instructor: 
Kathy Grandinetti
This is the advanced course in Creative Writing-Poetry designed primarily for undergraduates who have taken the series of workshops at the beginning and intermediate levels. This is a workshop course in which you create the texts we consider. We will also look at “model” poets for prompts and inspiration. Get ready to surprise yourselves!

English 4567S: Rhetoric and Community Service
Instructor: 
Christa Teston
In this undergraduate service learning seminar, you will experience firsthand through in-class workshops coupled with writing for a community partner how rhetoric (and writing) can affect (both positively and negatively) social change. You’ll receive one-on-one assistance from me regarding your writing for a nonprofit organization with whom I’ll pair you during the first few course meetings. Your community partnership affords you exposure to the complexity of organizational communication and nonprofit labor—exposure you may not otherwise have were you confined only to the classroom. Course deliverables include a wide range of kinds of writing for nonprofit organizations (e.g. press releases, brochures, flyers, social media content), a white paper based on your experiences with the organization you’re assigned, and a digital portfolio.

English 4569: Digital Media in English Studies — Digital Messaging and Storytelling
Instructor: 
Scott DeWitt
This course will take up the study of digital media and its relationship to messaging and storytelling. Students from across areas in the Department of English or in majors outside of English will work on a series of short form digital projects using rich media. The most significant part of this course focuses on the "P" word:  Production. This course is structured mostly as a studio class, where we will be working together in one of the Digital Media Project's classroom. Some of you may have experience with the technologies we will compose with. For those of you new to these technologies, I will teach you more than you need to know to be successful in this class. Please do not let your lack of experience with technology intimidate you. 

English 4572: Traditional Grammar and Usage
Instructor:
 Lauren Squires
You will learn to describe and analyze the structure of English sentences, developing technical terminology and practicing ways of representing sentence structure through diagrams. Rather than memorizing and applying rules for "correct" English, you will become familiar with the concepts and patterns of grammar from a linguistic—a scientific—perspective. The focus of the class is not “how to write well” or “how to have good grammar.” Instead, we will seek to understand the linguistic principles that underlie all speaking and writing in English. This will ultimately equip you with the skills to more critically understand speaking and writing style, including “good writing” and products designed to encourage it, such as usage handbooks.

English 4578 (20): Special Topics in Film — Film and Video Games
Instructors: 
Jesse Schotter
Special Topics in Film: Film and Video Games - In the last decade, the video game industry has eclipsed the movies in popularity. This class will examine how films from Hollywood and around the world have reacted to the rise of video games as a new and increasingly dominant medium. We'll spend the first few weeks articulating the similarities and differences between video games and cinema, and looking at the ways in which video games have become more like films. In so doing, we'll explore theories of video games and of the relationship between competing media forms. The bulk of the class will focus on an examination of recent films that seek to emulate or improve upon the unique characteristics of video games.  We'll examine issues of narrative, spectatorship, performance, and gender representation. Films may include The MatrixChildren of MenScott Pilgrim vs. The WorldRun Lola RunHoly Motors, and Being John Malkovich. Assignments will include two papers, as well as two brief responses and presentations about individual video games.

English 4578 (30): Special Topics in Film
Instructors: 
Jian Chen
Examination of particular topics, themes, genres, or movements in cinema; topics may include particular directors (Orson Welles), periods (The Sixties), genres (horror). 

English 4580: Special Topics in LGBTQ Literatures and Cultures — Baldwin, Lorde and LGBT Liberation
Instructor: 
Koritha Mitchell
James Baldwin (1924-1987) and Audre Lorde (1934-1992) were prolific writers who offered insights through several genres. Their artistic contributions continue to shape many people's understanding of the workings of capitalism, racism, sexism, and heteronormativity. Lorde famously dubbed herself a "black, lesbian, mother, warrior, poet" while Baldwin never claimed labels, but generations of artists, scholars, activists, and ordinary citizens (who find affirmation in their work) now celebrate them both as Black Queer Artists. This course will explore their contributions by sampling some of their most influential texts. Readings will likely include Baldwin's essays and novels as well as Lorde's essays, poetry, and her "biomythography" ZAMI. We will end the semester with Janet Mock's Redefining Realness in order to consider how Baldwin's and Lorde's efforts in the 1940s through the 1980s helped make a path for more recent articulations of LGBT liberation.

English 4582: Special Topics in African American Literature — Homemade Citizenship
Instructor: 
Koritha Mitchell
Even when they embody everything the nation claims to respect, African Americans cannot count on being treated like citizens. Simply consider the black soldiers and nurses who served in the Civil War, WWI, and WWII only to be disfranchised and denigrated … or consider the Ivy League-educated constitutional lawyer who rose to the office of president only to face demands that he “show his papers,” his birth certificate and academic transcripts. This course gives students an opportunity to explore the ways in which African Americans have made home and made citizenship from scratch. Despite the nation's constant attempts to convince them that they should never feel at home and never feel like citizens, they have cultivated a sense of belonging nonetheless. So, rather than assume that Black-authored texts primarily protest injustice, we will examine how Black cultural expression affirms what community members ideally already know about themselves and each other. Readings will likely include nineteenth-century works by Henry "Box" Brown, William & Ellen Craft, and Frances Harper, and twentieth-century works by Zora Neale Hurston, Audre Lorde, and Tayari Jones.

English 4587: Studies in Asian American Literature and Culture — The South-Asian Diaspora
Instructor:
 Pranav Jani
This course investigates literature, film and nonfictional texts by and about South Asian Americans, paying special attention to the politics of identity formation. What notions of religion, gender, nation, class, and sexuality govern these identities? Where have South Asian Americans fit in terms of the racial and ethnic dynamics of American society? How have ideas about the "exotic" or "spiritual" East and the "materialist" West shaped the image (and self-image) of this group? Throughout, our aim will be to see the historical contexts within which these questions have changed—especially since greater immigration from Asia was allowed in 1965. We will specifically discuss how cultural identities have been shaped recently by corporate globalization and the global popularity of everything "Indian," from Bollywood, bhangra and mehndi to writers and software engineers. The South Asian-British experience will also be referenced by way of comparison. By drawing on literary, cinematic, historical and ethnographic texts, this course seeks to provide students with an interdisciplinary framework for understanding the diverse and often conflicting ways through which the desi experience is portrayed and understood. Grading will be based on intensive class participation, an oral presentation, regular blog posts, two short papers and a longer research paper.

English 4592: Special Topics in Women in Literature and Culture — Medieval Women
Instructor:
 Karen Winstead
This course will examine literature written by, for and about women during the Middle Ages. We will read Hrotsvitha of Gandersheim, medieval Europe's first dramatist; Hildegard of Bingen, a Rhineland nun, mystic, advisor to rulers and popes, and author of poetry, music, plays and treatises on topics ranging from botany to sex; Margery Kempe, wife, mother of fourteen, entrepreneur and would-be saint; and Christine de Pizan, young widow and controversial "proto-feminist" who supported her children and mother by writing poetry, political allegories and self-help books at the court of France.  We will also read about remarkable gender-benders, including the military leader and martyr Joan of Arc and the (fictional) Silence, born a woman but raised to be a great knight.  

English 4595: Literature and Law — The Outsider in the Courtroom
Instructor: 
Clare Simmons
"Literature and Law" is a course in the representation of law in literature and the literary analysis of legal discourse; it is not a course in the study of law, but should be of interest to anyone who wants to engage with the role of law in culture; the legal and literary representation of human rights; and how law uses language. Literature and Law can be applied towards the English major and Human Rights minor; many students from other departments also take it to fulfill upper-level course requirements, so the course provides an excellent opportunity to meet students from a wide variety of fields who are interested in law and perhaps thinking about Law School.  We will read both some legal materials and some literature that represents law in action. The special topic of this course is "The Outsider in the Courtroom," so we will read some actual cases and also a variety of fictional representations of law in action, and consider how the rights of outsiders are protected, or sometimes forgotten, by the law.  We will also practice some courtroom procedures of our own in mock-trials.  Readings will include a 2000-year-old murder trial; some medieval animal trials; Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice; the Amistad trial; Wilkie Collins's novel The Law and the Lady; Reginald Rose's Twelve Angry Men; and Kate Rose Guest Pryal's Short Guide to Writing About Law.  

English 4597.04H: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Narrative in the Contemporary World — Serial Storytelling Across Media
Instructor: 
Sean O'Sullivan
Stories told in installments have been wildly popular since the nineteenth century—and they play a huge role in our current digital moment.  In this course, we will examine serial narratives across eras, platforms and media—including television, podcasts, film, comics and novels.  We will consider central questions of how we experience time, routine, memory and character and how we connect and distinguish the part and the whole.  Our materials are likely to include, among other stories: the Serial podcast; the TV series Breaking Bad and AtlantaA Tale of Two Cities; and Groundhog Day.”

English 4999: Undergraduate Research — Thesis
Instructor:
 Staff
A program of reading arranged for each student, with individual conferences, reports and a paper and/or thesis.

English 4999H: Honors Research
Instructor:
 Staff
A program of reading arranged for each student with individual conferences, reports and an honors thesis. Open only to candidates for distinction in English. 


5000-level

 

English 5189s/CompStd 5189s: Ohio Field School
Instructor: Cassie Patterson
**Advanced undergraduate students are encouraged to enroll in 5000-level courses. The Ohio Field Schools course provides an introduction to ethnographic field methods (participant-observation, writing field notes, photographic documentation, audio-interviewing), archiving and the public exhibition of research for both undergraduates and graduate students. Students will contribute to a team-based, immersive research project designed to document the ways that diverse communities express and preserve a sense of place in the face of economic, environmental and cultural change. This semester-long, experientially-based course will consist of three parts:

  1. Introduction to fieldwork (on Ohio State campus in Columbus)
  2. A one-week field experience in Scioto County during spring break (where students will reside together on-site)
  3. Accessioning, digital gallery preparation and reflection (on Ohio State campus in Columbus.

Thus, throughout the semester, students will practice all of the skills necessary to construct a permanent record of local expressive culture that will be accessible to future researchers and community members. Participation in all parts of the course is required. 

English 5664: Studies in Graphic NarrativeGraphic Memoir
Instructor: Robyn Warhol
**Advanced undergraduate students are encouraged to enroll in 5000-level courses."Graphic Memoir" studies the styles, structures, and strategies of autobiographies told in comics form. Beginning with how-to books drawn by comics artists Scott McCloud (Making Comics) and Matt Madden (99 Ways to Tell a Story: Exercises in Style), we will read graphic memoirs in book form and online, asking what it means to put the "graph" in "autobiography." We begin with graphic narratives connecting individuals with historical events such as Art Spiegelman's memoir of his father's experience of the Holocaust, Maus; Marjane Satrapi's story of her childhood and early adult years in Iran during the Islamic Revolution, Persepolis; and G. B. Tran's search for his family's role in the Vietnam War, Vietnamerica. Next we read memoirs of illness and recovery, such as Marisa Acocella Marchetto's Cancer Vixen; David B's Epileptic; and Khale McHurst's webcomic, I Do Not Have an Eating Disorder. And finally we read women's memoirs focusing on gender and sexuality such as Alison Bechdel's Fun Home, Lynda Barry's One! Hundred! Demons!, and Phoebe Gloeckner's The Diary of a Teenage Girl. Throughout the course we will read examples of academic comics theory and criticism.

English 5723.01/02: Graduate Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture — Religion, Revolution and Retreat in Seventeenth-Century Literature
Instructor: Hannibal Hamlin
**Advanced undergraduate students are encouraged to enroll in 5000-level courses. The first European Revolution exploded in England in the seventeenth century. After years of Civil War the New Model Army of the Puritan Parliament defeated supporters of King Charles I, and the king was tried and publicly beheaded for crimes against the state. For over a decade England was a Puritan Commonwealth ruled by zealots who expected the Apocalypse in their lifetimes. The world was turned upside down, shaking up a storm of radical religious and political ideas. New sects sprang up across the country: Baptists, Presbyterians, Quakers, Levellers, Diggers, Ranters, Familists, Fifth Monarchists, Grindletonians, Philadelphians, Muggletonians, and Dissenters of all sorts, along with more mainstream Puritans and traditional Anglicans. Much of the most powerful and exciting literature of the period expressed, questioned, and explored religious ideas. We will read some of the great metaphysical poems of John Donne, George Herbert, Henry Vaughan, and Thomas Traherne, radical pamphlets by Gerard Winstanley, John Reeve, and Abiezer Coppe, the religious autobiography of the physician Thomas Browne, and John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress, written while he was in the Bedford Jail for illegal preaching, and one of the most popular books in English literary history. Women also saw opportunities in these revolutionary times, and we will read poems by Aemelia Lanyer, Hester Pulter, and the author of Eliza’s Babes, as well as prophecies by Lady Eleanor Davies, Anna Trapnel, and Mary Cary. We’ll talk about religious ideas (and their social and political implications) and the interpretation of the Bible, as well as literary matters like poetic form, rhetorical styles, and allegorical narrative. We may also ask what these centuries-old religious expressions mean for us in twenty-first century America. Can devotional poems be read in a secular context, or is this eavesdropping on personal prayers? What is the difference between a divinely-inspired mystic and a victim of delusion and madness? Can both produce great literature? Finally, was the English Revolution the birth of religious liberty or an efflorescence of zealous extremism shut down by the secular Enlightenment? 

Text

1000-level

 

English-1109: Intensive Writing and Reading
Instructor:
 Staff
Provides intensive practice in integrating academic reading and writing. 

English-1110.01: First-Year English Composition
Instructor:
 Staff
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers. 
*Traditional and online sections available
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English-1110.01H: Honors First-Year English Composition
Instructors: 
Nancy Johnson and Francis Donoghue
Provides intensive practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers. 
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English-1110.02: First-Year English Composition
Instructor
: Staff
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing and in the essays of professional writers. Taught with an emphasis on literary texts. 
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English-1110.02H: Honors First-Year English Composition
Instructor: 
Christiane Staff
Provides intensive practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student’s own writing and in the essays of professional writers. Taught with an emphasis on literary texts.
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English-1110.03: First-Year English Composition
Instructor: 
Christiane Buuck and Staff
Intensive practice in fundamentals of expository writing illustrated in the student's own writing and essays of professional writers; offered in a small class setting and linked with an individual tutoring component in its concurrent course, ENGLISH-1193. This course is available for EM credit only through the AP program. 
GE: Writing and Communication—Level 1

English-1193: Individual Studies
Instructor:
 Martha Sims               
Intensive practice in the fundamentals of expository writing. 


2000-level

 

ENGLISH-2201: Selected Works of British Literature—Medieval Through 1800
Instructors: 
Hannibal Hamlin and Staff
An introductory critical study of the works of major British writers from 800 to 1800. 
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

ENGLISH-2201H: Selected Works of British Literature—Medieval Through 1800|
Instructor: 
Leslie Lockett
An introductory critical study of the words of major British writers from 800 to 1800. 
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

ENGLISH-2202: Selected Works of British Literature—1800 to Present
Instructor: 
Staff
An introductory critical study of the works of major British writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

ENGLISH-2202: Selected Works of British Literature—1800 to Present
Instructor: 
Clare Simmons 
*This course is designed to introduce students to the major periods in British literature from 1800 to the present, namely, the Romantic, Victorian, Modern and Postmodern periods, through the study of representative works and central ideas. The course provides a historical foundation for advanced-level study of British literature. A loose theme for this course will be the tension between a rationalist understanding of the material world and the world of imagination and feeling—or as Jane Austen expressed it, Sense and Sensibility, the title of the first novel that we will read. Other readings will include influential poetry by Wordsworth, Coleridge, Tennyson, Browning, the Rossettis, Hardy, Eliot, Thomas and others; and samplings of fiction by such authors as Dickens, Woolf, Conrad and Rushdie. By the end of the course, you should be able to read and analyze poetry and prose and place them in their historical context; you should also be able to write a brief critical analysis of a literary work. Finally, you should be able to compare and contrast aspects of British culture of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with those of the present day.  
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

ENGLISH-2202H: Selected Works of British Literature—1800 to Present
Instructor:
 David Riede
*This course is designed as an introduction to the great literary figures and movements from the time of the French Revolution to our own times. We will be especially interested in distinguishing the Romantic, Victorian, modernist and postcolonial periods and movements. Classes will consist of lecture and discussion, but mostly discussion, I hope. 
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

ENGLISH-2220: Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructors: 
Antony Shuttleworth, Hannibal Hamlin and Staff
Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience. 
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

ENGLISH-2220H: Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructor: 
Christopher Highley
Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience. 
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

ENGLISH-2260: Introduction to Poetry
Instructor: 
David Riede 
*This course is intended as an introduction to major poems and poets in the English language and will examine poems in historical, literary-historical and broader cultural contexts. We will be concerned especially with poetic form and craft and the many and various uses of such forms as sonnets, ballads, odes, blank and rhymed verse and so on, and we will also focus on the crafting of voice, tone, imagery, sound and rhythm. 
GE: Literature

ENGLISH-2260: Introduction to Poetry
Instructor: 
Matthew Cariello
Designed to help students understand and appreciate poetry through an intensive study of a representative group of poems. 
GE: Literature

ENGLISH-2261: Introduction to Fiction
Instructors:
 Mark Conroy, Roxann Wheeler, Sandra MacPherson, David Brewer, Jill Galvan and Matthew Cariello
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included. 
GE: Literature

ENGLISH-2261: Introduction to Fiction
Instructors: 
Elizabeth Renker
*This class will introduce students to fiction as an art form. The instructor will train you in a core group of analytical methods that will enable you to understand how fiction works. We will read an array of short stories and short novels by various authors who have experimented with fiction over the past two centuries, including Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Flannery O'Connor, Charles Chesnutt, John Barth and more.  You will finish this class with improved skills for understanding fiction and stronger analytical abilities. 
GE: Literature

ENGLISH-2261: Introduction to Fiction
Instructor: 
Jill Galvan
*This course has two goals. The first is to familiarize (or re-familiarize) you with some of the basic literary concepts (character, point of view, tone, symbolism, etc.) associated with the genre of fiction. The second is to help you feel comfortable approaching fiction critically. You will learn college-level strategies for analyzing literature, including reading a text with an eye for fine detail (a.k.a. close-reading) and how to construct logical interpretations based on textual evidence. The instructor will likely provide some lecture in each meeting, but much of the class will be conducted as a general discussion. Our readings will span literary history, as well as diverse cultural and social perspectives. They will loosely circulate around the theme of humanity/what it means to be human. Texts are still very tentative but might include Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Octavia Butler's Kindred, Justin Torres's We the Animals and Karen Joy Fowler's We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves. 
GE: Literature

ENGLISH-2261H: Introduction to Fiction
Instructor:
 Zoe Thompson
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations; comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included. 
GE: Literature

ENGLISH-2263: Introduction to Film
Instructor:
 Staff
Introduction to methods of reading film texts by analyzing cinema as technique, as system and as cultural product. 
GE: VPA

ENGLISH-2263: Introduction to Film
Instructor:
 Ryan Friedman 
*This course familiarizes students with the basic building blocks of film, the forms that movies use to tell stories, move viewers emotionally, communicate complex ideas, and dramatize social conflicts. It also introduces students to significant developments in film history and ways of approaching film interpretation. Our primary goal is to become skilled at thinking, talking and writing critically about movies and, in the process, to deepen our appreciation and understanding of the film medium.
GE: VPA

ENGLISH-2264: Introduction to Popular Culture Studies
Instructor:
 Frank DiPiero and Staff
Introduction to the analysis of popular culture texts. 
GE: Cultures & Ideas
This is a combined section class

ENGLISH-2265: Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructors:
 Mallory Laurel, David Bukszpan, Tyler Sones and Meghan Callahan
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.

ENGLISH-2266: Introductory Poetry Writing
Instructors: 
Allison Talbot and Jessica Lieberman
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, composition, and prosody; practice in the writing of poetry; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published poems by established poets.

ENGLISH-2267: Introduction to Creative Writing
Instructor: 
Zoe Thompson
An introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction. Analysis and discussion of student work, with reference to the general methods and scope of all three genres. 

ENGLISH-2268: Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor:
 Elizabeth Rose-Cohen
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, and composition; practice in the writing of creative nonfiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published essays by masters of the many forms of creative nonfiction.

ENGLISH-2269: Digital Media Composing
Instructor: 
Staff
A composition course in which students analyze and compose digital media texts while studying complex forms and practices of textual production. 
GE: VPA

ENGLISH-2270: Introduction to Folklore
Instructor: 
Katherine Borland
Folklore theory and methods explored through engagement with primary sources: folktale, legend, jokes, folksong, festival, belief, art. Folklore Minor course.
GE: Cultures & Ideas
This is a combined section class

ENGLISH-2275: Thematic Approaches to Literature—Oil and Water in Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Native American Literatures
Instructor:
 Joshua Anderson
GE: Literature
*Rather than upholding the cliché that “oil and water don’t mix,” this course explores how oil and water have long been intertwined in Indian Country. With works by Native authors Winona LaDuke and Thomas King we will explore the art, activism and literature related to the recent #NoDAPL Standing Rock and Keystone XL pipeline protests, and discuss the contemporary hip-hop of Lakota rapper Frank Waln, the punk-influenced music of AlterNative bands and the artwork of Native artist Bunky Echo Hawk. With Linda Hogan’s novel Mean Spirit and materials from online FBI case files, we will trace the history of oil and water back to the 1920s Oklahoma oil boom that made the Osage Tribe the “wealthiest nation on earth” and resulted in the “Reign of Terror,” in which more than 60 Osage were murdered, most of which remain unsolved. Finally, in our unit “Representation and Resistance,” we will read works by Eric Gansworth, Sherman Alexie, and Louise Erdrich that will help us recognize the interconnections between (mis)representations of Native peoples in politics and and pop-culture and resistance to economic and environmental racism. With an emphasis on interdisciplinary learning, this GE: Literature course invites participation from a broad range of students with interests in literature and environmental studies, law, politics, and pop-culture, engineering, economics, health care, and resource management.

ENGLISH-2276: Arts of Persuasion
Instructor:
 James Fredal
*This course will be an introduction to the arts of persuasion as taught and practiced through the discipline of rhetoric and sophistic since the fifth century B.C. We will first review the elements of a rhetorical encounter, including the speaker or producer, the viewer or audience, the topic and text, the cultural context and situation, etc. Then we'll examine a series of different genres of persuasive texts, both verbal, visual, and auditory, to better understand the uses, goals, resources and limitations available to all parties to a rhetorical encounter to make themselves heard, understood and accepted.
GE: Cultures & Ideas

ENGLISH-2277: Introduction to Disability Studies
Instructor: Sean Kamperman
*This course investigates the ways that disability is constructed in contemporary life and how it shapes our ideas of ourselves and others. Together, we’ll discuss concepts like normal, passing, inspiration and access, and consider how these concepts emerge and are contested through individual authors’ and artists’ composing practices.
GE: Cultures & Ideas

ENGLISH-2280: The English Bible
Instructor:
 James Fredal
*You’ve heard about it, seen movies about it, wondered what's really in it, maybe you’ve even tried to read it: the Bible continues to be one of, if not the, best-selling book of all time and a book of tremendous importance not only for the religious lives of individuals and communities, but for Western and indeed, world history. Perhaps no book has had as great an impact on as many people and nations across the centuries as the Judeo-Christian Bible. It has long been revered as the authoritative source of moral and spiritual teaching and individual and world salvation. It has also, more recently been reviled for its role in supporting slavery, misogyny, homophobia, racism, colonialism and genocide. Unfortunately, it can also be notoriously difficult to follow, interpret or even understand the Bible's strange language. Compelling stories are often followed by long lists of boring “begats” Strange tales involving improbable characters with unpronounceable names are followed by long-winded speeches or a string of “shalt-nots” that often seem simplistic, impossible to apply or completely irrelevant to contemporary life. Impossibilities and contradictions abound. Who can make sense of it? Our goal in this class is not to produce the final answer on the Bible or its meaning, but simply to get used to its language and to work through some of its most important genres, themes and characters. Our goal is to get a handle on the Biblical story in all its parts and sections, as it has been built up over centuries by dozens or hundreds of mostly anonymous authors. Our goal will also be to get a sense, beyond its many parts and contradictions, of the larger unity of thought and aspiration conveyed through the Bible. We will attempt to get a handle on its message and its purpose.
GE: Literature

ENGLISH-2281: Introduction to African-American Literature
Instructor: 
Koritha Mitchell
*How does music (including hip hop, jazz and the blues) relate to the Nobel prize-winning literature of someone like Toni Morrison? Does the slang some African Americans speak have any relationship to the work of black scholars who write academic books while teaching at universities? This course will answer these and similar questions while exposing students to the African American literary tradition, from 1760 to the present. It will also empower students to answer such questions long after the class is over, by equipping them with intellectual concepts: call and response, masking and signifyin(g). This course will not only introduce students to major figures in African American literature; it will also place these figures in the context of African American history and culture. We will work from the premise that this literary tradition has never existed solely to respond to so-called "dominant" culture and "mainstream" literature. In addition to well-known writers, such as Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston, this course will explore the work of equally important but less widely known authors, such as Harriet Jacobs, Ida B. Wells, Charles Chesnutt and Audre Lorde. 
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
This is a combined lecture class

ENGLISH-2282: Introduction to Queer Studies—Queer & Trans Micro-Politics of the Everyday
Instructors: 
Joy Ellison and Jian Chen
*This seminar explores queer and trans politics from the emergence of counter-cultural protest, critique and community building in the late 1960s to the networked and embedded practices, relationships and identities of the first decades of the twenty-first century. 
GE: Cultures & Ideas
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
This is a combined section class

ENGLISH-2290: Colonial and U.S. Literature to 1865
Instructors: 
Jared Gardner and Staff
Introductory study of significant works of U.S. literature from its colonial origins to 1865. 
GE: Literature

ENGLISH-2367.01: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience
Instructors: 
James Griffith, Scott DeWitt and Staff
Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America. 
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

ENGLISH-2367.01H: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience
Instructor:
 Staff
Extends and refines expository writing & analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America. 
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

ENGLISH-2367.01H: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience
Instructor: 
Staff
Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

ENGLISH-2367.01S: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience—Literacy Narratives of Black Columbus Visual Artists 
Instructor: 
Sherita Roundtree
*This course will focus on the literacy narratives of Black visual artists in Columbus. We will learn from these artists’ literate lives and explore literacy’s relationship to their art. As a writer in this course, you will engage your perceptions of literacy through community-based research, expository writing and oral presentation.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

ENGLISH-2367.02: Literature in the U.S. Experience
Instructor: 
Staff
Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

ENGLISH-2367.02H: Literature in the U.S. Experience
Instructors: 
Pranav Jani and Jennifer Patton
Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience. 
GE: Literature
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

ENGLISH 2367.03: Documentary in the U.S. Experience
Instructor:
 Staff
An intermediate course that extends and refines skills in critical reading and expository writing through analysis of written texts, video and documentaries. 
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)

ENGLISH-2367.05: The U.S. Folk Experience
Instructor: 
Staff
Concepts of American folklore and ethnography; folk groups, tradition, and fieldwork methodology; how these contribute to the development of critical reading, writing and thinking skills. 
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)

ENGLISH-2463: Introduction to Video Games Analysis
Instructor:
 Staff
An introduction to humanities-based methods of analyzing and interpreting video games in terms of form, genre, style and theory. No background in video game play is necessary. All students will have regular opportunities for hands-on experience with different game types and genres in both the computer-based classroom and the Department of English Video Game Lab.
GE: VPA


3000-level

 

ENGLISH-3150: Career Preparation for English and Related Majors
Instructor: 
Jennifer Patton
This general elective course helps English majors and students from other humanities disciplines to explore and prepare for careers after graduation. Students will analyze texts to gain a practical and theoretical understanding of the world of work. They will learn to identify their own strengths and preferences to guide their job activity and career choices.

ENGLISH-3271: Structure of the English Language
Instructor:
 Lauren Squires
*Students learn basic characteristics of English linguistics focusing on the basic building blocks of language; the sounds of English and how they are put together, word formation processes and rules for combining words into utterances/sentences. Students investigate and explore linguistic variation, accents of American English and the implications of language evaluation in educational settings.
GE: Cultures & Ideas

ENGLISH-3304: Business and Professional Writing
Instructor:
 Christa Teston
*In this course, you will learn principles and practices associated with writing well in business and professional contexts. You will be provided with a good deal of feedback on your prose and several opportunities to refine your style, organization, and collaborative writing strategies. Most of in-class time will involve workshopping course deliverables and learning the nuances of successful professional communication. At the end of this course, you will have writing samples that demonstrate expertise with the following genres: correspondence genres (letters, memos, social media); presentation genres (pitches, pecha kucha, slideware); collaboration genres (charter document, strategic plan); information genres (reports, documentation, PSAs, fact sheets); proposal genres (project proposals, marketing proposals); employment search genres (resume, cover letter, interview techniques).

ENGLISH-3305: Technical Writing
Instructor: 
Staff
Study of principles and practices of technical writing. Emphasis on the style, organization, and conventions of technical and research reports, proposals, memoranda, professional correspondence, etc.
GE: Cultures & Ideas

ENGLISH-3361: Narrative and Medicine 
Instructor:
 Jared Gardner
*This course is built on the principle that narrative competence improves outcomes for both caregivers and patients. We will explore this by taking up a range of questions, for instance: How does narrative give us greater insight into illness, medical treatment, doctor-patient relationships and other aspects of health and medicine?   
GE: Literature

ENGLISH-3364: Special Topics in Popular Culture—Vampires 
Instructor: 
Karen Winstead 
*This course will examine the representation of vampires in popular culture, from their folkloric roots and their classic literary representations in the nineteenth century—John Polidori's Vampyre, Sheridan Le Fanu's Carmilla and Bram Stoker's Dracula—to their recent incarnations in TV, film and novels. We will consider what made blood-suckers so mesmerizing and how their image has shifted over the centuries. We will also consider how these figures have been used to explore a host of social issues—generational and class conflict, changing gender roles, sexual identity—as well as to articulate "forbidden" passions and fears.  
GE: Cultures & Ideas

ENGLISH-3364: Special Topics in Popular Culture—Insurgent Youth: Punk, Riot Grrrl and Black Metal 
Instructor:
 Thomas Davis
*How do cultural worlds respond to moments of political distress? How can music, art and lifestyles model other ways of living and thinking? This class pursues these two questions by investigating three distinct subcultures: punk, riot grrrl and black metal. We will listen to a wide range of music, placing it in its historical context and tracing its lasting influences. Readings and viewings will range across documentary films, memoirs, cultural theory, zines and other literary and visual texts. Our class will also host visits from music journalists, scholars and participants in these three subcultures.
GE: Cultures & Ideas

ENGLISH-3372: Science Fiction and/or Fantasy: Science Fiction, or, How to Build Worlds
Instructor:
 Brian McHale
* If you regularly read science fiction and watch sf films and consider yourself a knowledgeable fan, or if you only occasionally read or watch SF, or if you never read SF and seldom watch SF films—whichever of these categories you belong to, this course is for you! Its purpose is to give you tools for thinking, speaking and writing about SF. Our main concern won't be SF’s history, its marketing and readership or even its ideas—though all of these things will come into the picture. Our focus will be on how SF is made—its form. We'll explore questions such as, What distinguishes science fiction from other types of fiction? How are science fiction novels (and films) constructed? How do we get from sentences on a page (or shots in a film) to worlds in the imagination? Specific topics will include the future, the alien and world-building. What does it mean to imagine the future? When we try to do so, are we really just imagining versions of the present? What about aliens— are they really just versions of ourselves, after all, ourselves in a funhouse mirror, or can we imagine something that is genuinely, radically not-us? What is involved in building a world? Why go to the trouble of building one, when there is a well-made and perfectly usable one all around us? 
GE: Literature

ENGLISH-3378: Special Topics in Film and Literature—Film and Comics: Race, Class, Sexuality and Disability
Instructor: 
Frederick Aldama 
*This course will study the conceptual and theoretical debates that have shaped film studies. It will also offer methods and approaches for understanding the devices used (mise-en-scene, lensing, sound, casting, for instance) by film directors to give shape to their various distillations and reconstructions of the building blocks of reality. It will also explore the perception, thought and feeling systems involved in audience consumption of film. It will explore how a film director creates a visual and auditory narrative that audiences know is not real, yet it triggers real emotions and thoughts about the world. However, in the contemporary period of our focus we will see how they become increasingly reciprocal, forming what we might call a world storytelling system built out of idiomatic and shared world storytelling mechanisms. We will acquire theoretical concepts and tools to understand better how our set of films and comics are built and how they may or may not make new our perception, thought and feeling concerning issues of racism, ableism, misogyny, homophobia and the like.
GE: Cultures & Ideas

ENGLISH-3379: Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy
Instructor:
 Roger Cherry
*This is an introduction to three fields that make up of one of the department's concentrations in the English major: writing, rhetoric and literacy. The course is a discussion-based and your participation and attendance are not merely encouraged but expected.  The instructor will provide relevant context; some rhetorical, historical and social background; and occasionally pose questions for discussion. The class will be a forum for the discussion of a variety of issues and will be most rewarding for both students and instructor if you are actively engaged and committed to lively classroom interaction.

ENGLISH-3379: Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy
Instructor:
 Evonne Halasek
Introduction to the interrelated fields of writing, rhetoric and literacy, familiarizing students with key concepts that underlie work in these interrelated fields and to the scholarly methods of WRL. Together, this discipline studies the ways people use language and other symbols to convey messages, persuade audiences, create meaning and how these practices are learned and taught. 

ENGLISH-3398: Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
 Sarah Neville, Christopher Jones, Amanpal Garcha, Sebastian Knowles, Christopher Highley and Ethan Knapp
This course serves as the methods course for the Literature and Creative Writing concentrations within the English major. Its purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of creative writing. 

ENGLISH-3465: Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing
Instructor:
 Stuart Lishan, Memory Risinger and Jessica Rafalko
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing fiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.

ENGLISH-3466: Special Topics in Intermediate Poetry Writing
Instructor:
 Babette Cieskowski
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing poetry. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.

ENGLISH-3467.S: Issues and Methods in Tutoring Writing
Instructor:
 Beverly Moss
Theories and practices in tutoring and writing; explores writing-learning connections and prepares students to work as writing consultants/tutors for individuals and small writing groups.

ENGLISH-3468: Special Topics in Intermediate Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor:
 Rachel Toliver
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing creative nonfiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.

ENGLISH-3662: An Introduction to Literary Publishing
Instructor:
 Margaret Cipriano
An introduction to the theory and practice of editing and publishing literature. 


4000-level

 

ENGLISH-4150: Cultures of Professional Writing
Instructors: 
Christiane Buuck, Daniel Seward and Christa Teston
Examine writing in various workplaces. Analyze writing discourse that shapes professional organizations. Explore ongoing technological and cultural shifts required of workplace writers and the role of digital media. 

ENGLISH-4189: Professional Writing Minor—Capstone Internship
Instructor:
 Jennifer Patton
Students work on-site in an organization doing writing-related work and meet weekly to discuss related topics. 

ENGLISH-4513: Introduction to Medieval Literature
Instructor: 
Christopher Jones
The study of masterpieces from the Middle Ages, chosen for their values in interpreting medieval culture as well as for their independent literary worth. 

ENGLISH-4520.01: Shakespeare
Instructor:
 Alan Farmer
*This course will explore the formal, social, and political engagements of Shakespeare's plays. It will pay particular attention to how his plays conform to and work against the genres of comedy, tragedy, history, and romance, and to how they represent such issues as gender, sexuality, religion, race and political power. In addition to some critical and historical essays on the early modern theater and culture, we will likely read some combination of the following plays: Richard III, Henry V, The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado About Nothing, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Measure for Measure, Othello, King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra, Macbeth, The Winter’s Tale and The Tempest. 

ENGLISH-4522: Renaissance Poetry—Milton’s Paradise Lost and the Fall in Renaissance Literature
Instructor: 
Alan Farmer
In this course, we will read what is arguably one of the best, most exciting, most contentious and most challenging poems in English literature: John Milton's Paradise Lost. First published in 1667 (and revised in 1674), Milton's epic largely centers on the fall of Adam and Eve, but it also covers events from the beginning of creation to the end of time. The poem looks back to the fall from Heaven of Satan and his rebel angels, ahead to the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus, and ultimately to the final judgment. In doing so, the poem addresses issues ranging from divine justice and the authority of God, to the origin of evil and the nature of sin, to the values of love and heroism, to the topical concerns of political theory and nationalism. We will read the entirety of Paradise Lost, but we will also study Milton's poem in relationship to his earlier, radical political writings from the 1640s, in which he called for the freedom of the press, the right to divorce and the execution of King Charles I. Finally, we will read other narratives of the Fall found in sermons, treatises and poems, including works by Aemilia Lanyer, Rachel Speght, Mary Roper and other women writers, as we consider the complicated religious, gender and literary politics of Milton's poem.

ENGLISH-4535: Special Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth Century British Literature and Culture
Instructor: 
Sandra MacPherson
Focused study of a major theme and/or critical problem arising from literature Restoration and/or eighteenth-century Britain: race and enlightenment, crime and criminals, sex and the city, the culture of sensibility and transatlantic literary culture. 

ENGLISH-4543: Twentieth-Century British Fiction—Political Fictions
Instructor:
 Thomas Davis
This course examines a wide range of fiction produced from locations that made up the British world system. We will be concerned primarily with the way literary texts register historical and political tensions and, sometimes, get marshaled directly for political ends. Our readings will take us through the various ways literature engages questions of empire, racism, fascism and migration in the twentieth century. We will close with two contemporary novels: Ali Smith's Autumn (first post-Brexit novel) and Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go, astirring meditation on the human. To address the relationship of aesthetics and politics, we will consider the formal dimensions of texts-figural language, emplotment, characterization, perspective, generic fidelity and infidelity-as encryptions of the multiple historical antagonisms that plagued Britain's slow descent from atop the world-system over the course of the twentieth century. Authors may include: Joseph Conrad, Virginia Woolf, Christopher Isherwood, George Orwell, Ali Smith, Kazuo Ishiguro, Sam Selvon and others.

ENGLISH-4547: Twentieth-Century Poetry
Instructor:
 Sebastian Knowles
A study of twentieth-century British and American poetry, with emphasis on such major figures as Frost, Yeats, Stevens, Eliot, Williams, Auden, Bishop and Langston Hughes. 

ENGLISH-4553: Twentieth-Century U.S. Fiction
Instructor: 
Jesse Schotter
A study of American fiction after 1914, with emphasis on such major figures as Anderson, Fitzgerald, Hemingway and Faulkner.

ENGLISH-4559: Introduction to Narrative and Narrative Theory
Instructor: 
Sean O’Sullivan
Study of narrative in its different manifestations, e.g., novel, autobiography, film, legal testimony and theories of its form and significance. 

ENGLISH-4563: Contemporary Literature
Instructor:
 Jessica Prinz
A study of poetry and prose written since approximately 1960.

ENGLISH-4564.02: Major Author in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century British Literature—Oscar Wilde
Instructor: 
Jill Galvan 
*Oscar Wilde is many things to many people. Some know him for his wit: his famously brief, paradoxical sayings and his comically masterful play The Importance of Being Earnest. Others associate him with modern ideas of art, especially the theory of art for art's sake, laid out most strikingly in his preface to The Picture of Dorian Gray. For still others, Wilde is an iconic gay man, remarkable for his sexual expression in his life and his art and ultimately tragically condemned for it. His biography gives us a stark portrait of a culture in which homosexuality is a literal crime. This class will examine these various faces of Wilde—his comedy, his sexuality, his celebrity, his individualism, his avant-gardism. We will read his major writings, in all their stunning range of genre (farce, melodrama, fairy tale, Gothic novel, Socratic dialogue, prison letter and more), putting them in the context of late-Victorian literature and history. Additionally, we will reflect on our own contemporary perception and mythology of Oscar Wilde. What have his writings on art, identity and culture come to represent for us, and why? 

ENGLISH-4565: Advanced Fiction Writing
Instructor: 
Lee Martin
*This is an advanced writing workshop that asks you to think about how literary fiction is made. Therefore, we won't be considering genre fiction (romance, sci-fi, fantasy, etc.). By literary fiction, I mean stories that are more character-driven than plot-driven. These stories show us something about the complexity of human existence by concentrating on characters and their conflicting wants, needs, fears, hopes, etc. I don't mean to suggest that these types of stories are without plots. Plenty happens, but what happens externally is less important than what happens internally to the characters involved and what it means for the rest of their lives. In other words, events occur because of the types of people characters are, and the plots that unfold always reveal something new about the inner lives of those characters. We might put it this way: characters create plots, and plots reveal characters. The main texts for this workshop will be the two stories that each student writes and presents for discussion. At the end of the semester, each student will present a portfolio that will include the drafts of the two stories with one of them significantly revised. We may have outside reading assignments of craft articles and stories. Each student will mark manuscripts and prepare summary letters for the other writers in the workshop.

ENGLISH-4566: Advanced Poetry Writing
Instructor:
 Marcus Jackson
Advanced workshop in the writing of poetry. This is a class for serious students of creative writing. Admission is by portfolio submission to the instructor. 

ENGLISH-4568: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor: 
Staff
Advanced workshop in the writing of creative nonfiction. This is a class for serious students of creative writing. Admission is by portfolio submission to the instructor.

ENGLISH-4571: Studies in the English Language—Language and Media
Instructor: 
Lauren Squires
The uses of language in media reveal the complicated interplay of language and social identity. This course will explore language in various popular media, bringing critical analysis to bear on media texts. We will use sociolinguistic concepts from the fields of language variation, discourse analysis and studies of genre, register and style. These will help us explore both mass media (like movies, TV, newspapers, music and sports broadcasting) and digital media (like instant messaging, Facebook, Twitter and texting). In our investigations, we will pay careful attention to media forms, linguistic forms and social factors. You will leave the class equipped with new ways of viewing media and popular culture, and with new tools for critically considering the role of language in everyday life.

ENGLISH-4572: Traditional Grammar and Usage
Instructor: 
Roger Cherry
*This course will first explore various meanings of the term "grammar."  We will examine our personal experience with "grammar" in order to establish a foundation for the academic study of the subject. Then we will turn our attention to the grammatical structures identified in the study of English syntax. Finally, we will take up a number of usage issues. Although the study of English grammar and usage might enhance speaking or writing abilities, the main focus of the course is not on improving these skills; for that you should enroll in a speech or writing course.

ENGLISH-4575: Special Topics in Literary Forms and Themes—Tainted Love: Queer Narratives, 1963 to Present Day
Instructor: 
William White
*From John Rechy's hustler travelogue City of Night to Audre Lorde's biomythography Zami to Alison Bechdel's graphic novel Fun Home, this seminar will explore how queerness has been portrayed, explored, challenged and broadened over the past sixty or so years. Topics will include coming-out stories, the literature of AIDS, performances of gender (with a keen eye toward drag), queer anti-urbanism and queer retellings. There will also be optional movie nights, with viewings of the classic documentaries Paris Is Burning and Small Town Gay Bar (popcorn provided). Readings: Alison Bechdel, Fun Home; Rita Mae Brown, Rubyfruit Jungle; Bernardine Evaristo, Mr. Loverman; Garth Greenwell, What Belongs to You; Randall Kenan, A Visitation of Spirits; Audre Lorde, Zami: A New Spelling of My Name; Mark Merlis, An Arrow's Flight; John Rechy, City of Night; Justin Torres, We the Animals and Achy Obejas, Memory Mambo.

ENGLISH-4576.01: History of Critical Theory I: Plato to Aestheticism
Instructor:
 Ethan Knapp
Study of the history of literary criticism and of special topics in critical theory; study of the developments and basic texts in literary criticism and critical theory from Plato to Oscar Wilde. 

ENGLISH-4577.02: Folklore II—Genres, Form, Meaning and Use
Instructor: 
Merrill Kaplan
Study of folk groups/communities, folklore genres and issues/methods in folklore studies. Study of the relationship between cultural forms, community interpretations and social uses. Folklore minor course. 

ENGLISH-4578: Special Topics in Film
Instructors: 
Sean O’Sullivan and Mark Conroy
Examination of particular topics, themes, genres or movements in cinema; topics may include particular directors (Orson Welles), periods (The Sixties) or genres (horror). 

ENGLISH-4580: Special Topics in LGBTQ Literatures and Cultures
Instructor:
 Martin Ponce
Focuses on themes and issues in LGBTQ literature and culture. 

ENGLISH-4583: Special Topics in World Literature in English
Instructor:
 Adeleke Adeeko
Study of literatures written in English and produced outside of the U.S. and Britain; topics include colonial/postcolonial writing, regional literature, theoretical and historical approaches and genres. 

ENGLISH-4587: Studies in Asian American Literature and Culture
Instructor: 
Martin Ponce
*This is a combined lecture course
Focuses on problems and themes in Asian American literature and culture from the late nineteenth century to the present. Topic varies. Examples: Asian American Literature and Popular Culture and Empire and Sexuality in Asian American Literature. 

ENGLISH-4590.07H: Literature in English after 1945
Instructor: 
Jessica Prinz
*This is a seminar in literature 1945 to the present. Students will be asked to do a hefty amount of reading in preparation for a discussion-based class. We will read novels by Delillo, Egan, Eggers, Morrison, Ishiguro and Danielewski. We will also consider a set of wonderful short stories by the following authors: S. Rushdie, K. Vonnegut, R. Carver, N. Hornby, R. Ellison, J. Cheever, D. Sedaris and D.F. Wallace. 

ENGLISH-4591.01H: Special Topics in the Study of Creative Writing—Creative Writing and Music
Instructor: 
Michelle Herman
*In this creative writing seminar, we'll look at all aspects of music-writing—from writing that describes what a piece of music or band or musician sounds like through written portraits and profiles of musicians and composers, fictional and non-, and from science writing about how and why we listen to music to writing for music (song lyrics and writing for musical theater). We'll read Nick Hornby, Stephen Sondheim, Rosanne Cash, Vikram Seth, Ellen Willis, Lavinia Greenlaw, Lin Manuel-Miranda and more. We'll listen to everything from Jimi Hendrix to Rufus Wainright. And you will be doing your own music writing in response to each segment of the course—and tackling a major final project that links music and creative writing. 

ENGLISH-4591.02H: Special Topics in the Study of Rhetoric
Instructor: 
Margaret Price 
Study of rhetorical theories and practices through examination of social communities, texts, movements and periods both past and present.

ENGLISH-4592: Special Topics in Women in Literature and Culture
Instructor: 
Jennifer Higginbotham
Using feminist perspectives, students will learn to analyze literature and other cultural works (film, television, digital media) written by or about women. Time period and topic vary.

ENGLISH-4597.01: The Disability Experience in the Contemporary World
Instructor: 
Margaret Price
Global, national and local issues of disability in the contemporary world; interdisciplinary approach combines historical, literary, philosophical, scientific and service-oriented analysis of experience of disability.

ENGLISH-4999: Undergraduate Research—Thesis
Instructor:
 Staff
A program of reading arranged for each student, with individual conferences, reports and a paper and/or thesis.

ENGLISH-4999H: Honors Research
Instructor: 
Staff
A program of reading arranged for each student with individual conferences, reports and an honors thesis. Open only to candidates for distinction in English. 


5000-level

Text

2000-level

 

English 2277—Introduction to Disability Studies
Instructor:
Andrew Sydlik
English 2277 is meant to help you become more critically informed about disability as a matter of history, biology, politics, art, power, identity, and more. This course fulfills the Arts and Humanities GEC Culture and Ideas requirement, and is a required core course for the interdisciplinary minor in Disability Studies. Our broad goal is to develop an understanding of disability as a complex and crucial part of the world's cultures and of human experience. More specifically, we will work together to:

  • Understand core concepts of Disability Studies and its emergence as a field of study
  • Explore disability as identity and way of being and knowing rather than as defect
  • Assess different "models" of understanding disability - social, medical, cultural, etc.
  • Contextualize attitudes and representations of disability according to historical time, place, and mediums (film, literature, law, etc.)
  • Apply Disability Studies concepts to your own fields of interest and study

At 20% of the population, people with disabilities constitute the largest minority in the United States (U.S. Census Bureau 2005), and total one billion (about 17%) globally (World Health Organization 2011). It is likely that most of us will have a disability, or be close to someone with a disability, at some point in our lives. Yet we rarely question the assumption that disability marks someone as lesser. We may not be aware of the barriers and discrimination that disabled people face. In this course we will interrogate and resist standards of beauty, able-bodiedness, and able-mindedness. This goes beyond representations and conscious prejudice. For example, why do we use words like blind, deaf, crippled, crazy, and retarded to describe moral failing, or to devalue someone? What unexamined beliefs do you hold about disability?

We will engage in critical conversations with each other and other scholars to discover the unexamined assumptions about disability (and bodies generally) embedded in society. Our aim is to say what texts leave unsaid, to state the non-obvious, to make their implicit ideas about disability explicit. Last but not least, we will learn to "talk back" to stereotypes and oppressive attitudes.

English 3271—Structure of the English Language
Instructor: Gabriella Modan
Students learn basic characteristics of English linguistics focusing on the basic building blocks of language; the sounds of English and how they are put together, word formation processes, and rules for combining words into utterances/sentences. Students investigate and explore linguistic variation, accents of American English, and the implications of language evaluation in educational settings.
Prereq: 1110.01 (110.01). Not open to students with credit for 4570 (570), 6760 (760), 271, 669, 671, 2271, or Linguist 601. GE cultures and ideas course.


3000-level

 

English 3304—Business and Professional Writing
Instructor: Christa Teston
In this course you will learn principles and practices associated with writing well in business and professional contexts. I'll provide you with a good deal of feedback on and several opportunities to refine your style, organization, and collaborative writing strategies. Most of our in-class time will involve workshopping course deliverables and learning the nuances of successful professional communication.

At the end of this course, you will have writing samples that demonstrate expertise with the following genres,

  • Correspondence genres (letters, memos, social media);
  • Presentation genres (pitches, pecha kucha, slideware);
  • Collaboration genres (charter document, strategic plan);
  • Information genres (reports, documentation, PSAs);
  • Proposal genres (project proposals, marketing proposals);
  • Employment search genres (resume, cover letter, interview techniques).

Research suggests that the best way to learn how to write professionally is to practice composing for meaningful, real world contexts, audiences, and purposes. In this class, therefore, you will practice rhetorically sound professional writing by partnering with Multiple Myeloma Opportunities for Research and Education (MMORE). You and your peers will have the unique opportunity to meet MMORE's marketing and communication needs while negotiating budgetary and time constraints. You'll also have a chance to work with cutting edge collaborative writing tools in a supportive digital media environment.


English 3305—Technical Writing
Instructor:
TBA
English 3305 (Technical Writing) is designed to improve the communication skills and career prospects of three groups: (1) science and engineering majors preparing for technology-focused careers, (2) humanities majors interested in exploring career options in technical communication, and (3) students of any major who want to enhance their marketability by learning about workplace writing. You do not need extensive background in science, technology, or writing to do well in this course.

English 3364: Special Topics in Popular Culture — Alternative Rock Lyrics as Poems
Instructor:
Elizabeth Renker
Before the twentieth century, poetry was as popular as music is today.  Many people today think of "poetry" as an elite or highbrow sphere of art that does not include the songs whose lyrics they love, sing out loud, ponder, and discuss with friends, but song lyrics are a vital and thriving form of poetry today--just as they have been for centuries.   Our class will train you in the skills of interpreting poetry and song lyrics, with special focus on the alternative/indie genre.  Our method will be to pair poems written over the past four centuries with recent songs that explore similar themes or forms.  For example, we might pair Arcade Fire with T.S. Eliot; St. Vincent with Robert Frost; John Donne with The Smiths; Emily Dickinson with Talking Heads; Neutral Milk Hotel with Edwin Arlington Robinson; The Antlers with Stars; Jackson Mac Low with Animal Collective; or Sharon Olds with Radiohead.

Over the course of the semester, class sessions will also include several videoconference sessions with working musicians from the local and national scenes who will talk to us about writing lyrics and about our interpretations of their songs. You will complete this class with a new ability to interpret the lyrics of the songs you love as well as a new appreciation for poetry. Monday and Wednesday sessions will be conducted as large lectures; Friday sessions will take a variety of formats, including smaller group meetings and online discussions and assignments in which you apply the learning from the week's lectures.

English 3364: Special Topics in Popular Culture — Janeites: Austen Fiction, Films and Fans
Instructor:
Robyn Warhol
Janeites: They have outfits. They re-enact Regency balls at annual conventions.  They are Jane Austen fanatics.  
There are at least 62 film and TV adaptations of works by Austen, 28 of them made in the last decade.  There are *Pride & Prejudice and Zombies*, movies about "Jane" herself, and movies where modern people go into Austen's world and vice-versa.  There's fan fiction.  There are Jane Austen action figures and "Mrs. Darcy" t-shirts.  And now there's even an online role-play game,  "Ever, Jane." There are children's versions of Austen novels.  Jane Austen cookbooks.  Advice books, card games, and board games about "WWJD?" ("What would Jane do?").  And of course, lots of literary criticism. In this class we will be reading some criticism as well as four Austen novels, and watching film adaptations including *Clueless* and the Bollywood-style *Bride and Prejudice*.  We will look at the proliferation of all these contemporary avatars of Jane and more, to ask what it means, especially for women now.

English 3372: Science Fiction and/or Fantasy — American Science Fiction of the 60s and 70s
Instructor:
Jared Gardner
This class will study the "New Wave" revolution in Science Fiction during the 1960s and 70s which challenged the aesthetics and ideals of the so-called "Golden Age" SF of the previous generation. Employing literary experimentation, and privileging of political and social issues over scientific realism this generation of writers and editors left a lasting impact on the genre that is still very much felt today. We will read from a wide range of writers, including Thomas Disch, Ursula Le Guin, Philip K. Dick, Octavia Butler,  Samuel Delany, Joanna Russ, James Tiptree, Jr. (Alice Bradley Sheldon), and Isaac Asimov. 
GE: Literature

English 3372: Science Fiction and/or Fantasy
Instructor:
 Karen Bruce, Katherine McCain, Sara Cleto
Introduction to the tradition and practice of speculative writing. Provides students the opportunity to examine and compare works of science fiction and/or fantasy. Prereq: 1110.01 (110.01) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 372.
GE: Literature

English 3372: Science Fiction and/or Fantasy — The Fairy Tale and Reality
Instructor: 
Dorothy Noyes
Most of us associate the fairy tale with magic and fantasy. This course considers the many ways in which fairy tales call us back to the "real" world; in fact, the modern Western world. We'll look first at the fairy tales of oral tradition as a kind of peasant survival guide, with examples from Italy, India, Ireland, and beyond. Then we'll see how the genre was domesticated and standardized in print and film, creating prominent models of selfhood and success along the way- a trajectory taking us from Perrault to the Grimms, to Hans Christian Andersen and Horatio Alger, and finally to Soviet children's writers and Walt Disney. There was always subversion on the sidelines, however, and we'll look at other writers and filmmakers who bend or break the dominant fairy tale script. In all these transformations, fairy tales explore the tension between three ways individuals can respond to the promise of modern society: playing the game to win, escaping the game, and changing the rules. But what happens when we lose faith in the game? In a group project we'll survey what has been happening lately to the fairy tale plot in popular culture. There will also be two exams.

English 3378—Special Topics in Film and Literature — Monsters Without and Within
Instructor:
Karen Winstead
Storytellers have long used monsters not only to frighten us but also to jolt us into thinking more deeply about ourselves, others, and the world we live in.  No film can be totally faithful to a written source; filmmakers perforce use different methods than do writers to tell their stories, to thrill and provoke.  However, this course focuses on films that aggressively transform their literary sources - reinterpreting characters and retooling plots to create monsters that offer different visions of what we have to fear and of how we can (or cannot) overcome the monsters without and within.We will move from dragons and humanoids to vampires, zombies, ghosts, androids, and psychopaths.  Our sampling of classics old and new will include Frankenstein, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Dracula, I Am Legend, and The Shining. Requirements will include weekly online quizzes, short papers, and a final exam.

English 3379—Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy
Instructor:
Jonathan Buehl
English 3379 is an introduction to three fields that make up of one of the Department's concentrations in the English major: Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Literacy Studies. We will discuss the history of these fields, the types of research problems that scholars in these fields investigate, and the theories and methods scholars use to study those problems. This course is also an introduction to being a student-scholar in the WRL concentration.  We will discuss and practice approaches to reading, research, and research-based writing that will help you succeed in this course as well as your other courses in the WRL concentration.

 

English 3398: Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
Adeleke Adeeko
This is a course on what we do, often implicitly, when we read and write about literature and culture. We will concentrate on methods of reading literary texts for the purpose of writing about how they convene readers to appreciate their form as literature. We will also study approaches that reading audiences bring to their making worldly sense of the texts.

English 3398: Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor: Jacob Risinger

In this gateway course, we'll take our cue from one of George Orwell's famous lines: "If people cannot write well, they cannot think well, and if they cannot think well, others will do their thinking for them." Over the course of the semester, our weekly readings, discussions, and informal exercises will work to annihilate old patterns of complacent reading-leaving in their place the analytical skills and rhetorical strategies you need to establish your own critical/original perspective on literary texts.   We'll attend to the practical work of conducting literary research and writing solid, well-argued essays - but we'll also practice using literary theory and various methods of criticism to identify new levels of meaning, even in familiar or (seemingly) straightforward texts. The hard work of writing and analysis will be supplemented by an array of engaging texts.  Well start with The Winter's Tale - one of Shakespeare's "problem plays" - and end with Tom Stoppard's recent play The Hard Problem.  Along the way, we'll read (among other things) lyric poetry by W.B. Yeats, Elizabeth Bishop, and Seamus Heaney; short stories by James Baldwin and Raymond Carver; and Jesmyn Ward's novel Salvage the Bones (recipient of the 2011 National Book Award). Requirements will include attendance, active participation, informal writing exercises, short essays, and a longer final essay.

English 3398: Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
James Fredal
Serves as the "Methods" course for the Literature and Creative Writing concentrations within the English major. Its purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing. Required of English majors. Open to English majors only or others by dept permission.
Prereq: 1110.01 (110.01) and declared major in English. Sr students must have the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Not open to students with credit for 2298, 3398H (398H), 302, 398, or 398H.

English 3398: Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
Jessica Prinz
The purpose of this course is to read broadly in the history of American and British literature with the goal of improving reading and writing skills. All key genres of literature will be considered (fiction, drama, and poetry). We will also devote a significant portion of the class to the various theories used to analyze literature ("critical theory"). Our primary text will be the anthology, A Little Literature (eds. Barnet, Berman, and Cain) as well as other texts to be assigned later. Requirements include several writing assignments, two exams,  and participation in class discussions.

English 3405: Special Topics in Professional Communication — Proposal Writing
Instructor: TBA

Proposals are documents that solve problems and help people and organizations make decisions. Good proposal writers are essential for many organizations, such as nonprofit groups that rely on grants to fund their operations and companies that compete for government contracts. In this class, you will learn about proposal-writing processes and practice writing proposals for real organizations. Our overarching goal will be to help our partner organizations secure new resources through grant proposals. In pursuing that goal, you will learn about the entire proposal development process-from analyzing the needs of clients and funders and identifying good funding opportunities to analyzing RFPs and creating feasible, affordable, and funding-worthy proposals. You'll also write a series of smaller proposals to help organize our collaborative work. Proposals are often large documents, and proposal writing is typically a collaborative endeavor. Therefore, part of this class will be dedicated to developing and practicing collaborative writing skills and strategies. We will examine and work with project-management and document-management systems used in contemporary workplaces to manage the complex workflows of proposal writing. Note: Grant proposals for scientific research grants will not be a primary focus of this class, though some of the skills we practice may translate to scientific grant writing.

English 3465: Special topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing
Instructor:
Alexander Odendahl
Our goal in this class is to better understand the craft of writing fiction, partly by studying the work of the masters, and partly by making our own foray into the grueling and yet oddly fulfilling (I hope) world of the fiction writer. We will read several short stories, focusing not only on our experiences as readers, but also approaching these works as fellow writers, studying how the authors have taken seemingly mechanical elements - plot, point of view, theme, symbol, style, structure, and other words that probably start with s - and created pieces greater than the sum of their parts: works of art that still surprise us decades after they were written. Then, from what we learn, we'll write our own stories.

English 3465: Special topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing — Revising Your Short Story
Instructor:
Cady Vishniac
What sort of story gets its author admitted to a top MFA program, or published in the New Yorker, or even nominated for a Booker or Nobel? Whose sentences will ring in our ears years after we turn the last page? The popular notion is that these writers are geniuses, people whose words always come out perfect on the first try. But the popular notion is wrong. Writing a good short story is a process that can and should take months, and many drafts. So that's what we'll be doing in this course: writing one story, then revising, revising, revising, making precisely one story as close to perfect as we can get it. On our last day of class, we will discuss submitting fiction to magazines and applying to funded degree programs in writing.

English 3465: Special topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing — Retellings
Instructor:
Noelle O'Reilly
In this intermediate fiction writing course, we will read and analyze contemporary stories that were inspired by fairytales, myths, and other classic tales. We will study both the original text and the modern retelling, seeking to understand how stories can borrow from the past but still stand on their own. For example, we will read the Brothers Grimm fairy tale "Hansel and Gretel" alongside Michael Cunningham?s short story "Crazy Old Lady." Cunningham borrows elements of the Grimm?s plot, but sets the story in modern times and tells it from the perspective of the witch. When we read Lauren Groff's 2006 short story "L. Debard and Aliette," we will also examine the 12th century letters upon which the story is based. In the second half of the semester, students will use a classic tale to inspire a short story of their own. This story will be workshopped by the class and then revised. The workshop will require students to analyze the work of their peers and provide constructive feedback.


English 3466: Special Topics in Intermediate Poetry Writing — Ekphrastic Poetry and Art Making
Instructor: Jacob Bauer
This will be an art-making course. A poetry course. A course that explores the relationship between art and poetry and blurs the boundaries between the two. "No ideas but in things" concrete poet Ian Hamilton Finlay once quipped. We will workshop student poems, created each week in response to various prompts. We will be investigating poetry that engages with and bisects other art forms. Beginning with ekphrasis -poems that respond to other art works in a variety of ways - by the end of the semester we will have tried our hands at poems that actually take the shape of other art forms. To do this, we will engage with text art and visual poetry, as well as other art forms. Although writing-focused and craft-driven, this will be a multi-modal course in which students think critically about how a poem is made. This includes standard concerns such as the line, diction, syntax, and form, but will also consider how poems work on and off the page. We will look at ekphrastic poems from across the 20th and 21st centuries, but also across disciplines for models, including pieces by artists working with poetry in other mediums, including William Blake, Jenny Holzer, Kendrick Lamar, and Babi Badalov.

English 3468: Special Topics in Intermediate Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor: 
Sonya Bilocerkowycz
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing creative nonfiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.
Prereq: Grade of C or above in 2268. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.

English 3662: An Introduction to Literary Publishing
Instructor: 
David Bukszpan
An introduction to the theory and practice of editing and publishing literature.
Prereq: 2265, 2266, 2267, or 2268. Not open to students with credit for 5662.01 or 662.

English 3662: An Introduction to Literary Publishing
Instructor: 
Suzannah Showler
This class is a seminar and practicum in literary editing and publishing. Through scholarly and literary readings, we will examine issues of ethics and aesthetics surrounding how books and magazines get made. Students will also work on acquiring some of the basic skills demanded by the publishing industry: substantive editing, copy-editing, fact-checking, design, innovation, aesthetic vision, etc. The course is designed around each student executing a major project of their choosing-something that will contribute to their job portfolios and/or development as a human. This class is aimed at self-starting, motivated students keen to develop skills and think seriously about literature and the industry surrounding its production.


4000-level

 

English 4150: Cultures of Professional Writing
Instructor:
TBA
Working both individually and collaboratively, you will conduct research, strategize, and produce work-world-ready text in a number of genres and media. Learn how to:

  1. Analyze the ways writing discourse shapes workplaces
  2. Enhance your professional writing skills and accuracy
  3. Craft texts for social media and other workplace platforms.

You will also explore the role of working writers in their organizations and present your findings as part of a panel on contemporary workplace writing. English 4150 is a required course for the Minor in Professional Writing and a prerequisite for the professional writing internship.

English 4189: Professional Writing Minor — Capstone Internship 
Instructor: 
Patricia Houston
Students work onsite in an organization doing writing-related work and meet weekly to discuss related topics.
Prereq: 4150 or CSTW 4150, and 2 courses in Professional Writing minor. Not open to students with more than 6 cr hrs of CSTW 4191. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs. This course is graded S/U.

English 4400: Literary Locations — Athens and Greece
Instructor: 
Jennifer Higginbotham
For centuries, Greek culture, philosophy, and literature has fascinated writers in the English tradition. Athens as a place shows up in the plays of Shakespeare and the poetry of Byron, and the genres developed by Greek writers have been integrated as tragedy and comedy, the modes of epic and lyric, and the forms of elegy, epigram, and Sapphic. In this class, we'll be reading Greek literature such as The Odyssey and Cavafy's poems alongside English works inspired by Greece and modeled after Greek writers. At the end of the semester, we'll compare our imaginations with the experience of a lifetime, exploring the landscape and ruins of Athens, the oracle at Delphi, the ancient theater at Epidavros, the quaint city of Nafplion, and the island of Corfu, places that shaped and have been shaped by English literary history. Students admitted to the Spring 2017 Literary Locations program will enroll in English 4400 (3 credit hours) during the Spring 2016 semester and English 5193 (1 credit hours) during the 1st summer session for the trip abroad. Navigate go to https://oia.osu.edu/ via the browser of your choice.  Select "Education Abroad," and "Getting Started," then search programs by country - Greece.  Select Literary Locations Greece and follow instructions for submitting your application.

English 4515:Chaucer
Instructor:
Ethan Knapp
Why take a course on Chaucer?  Chaucer's stories are some of the funniest, smartest, most beautiful and radically experimental works ever written.  You'll be surprised that medieval literature looks like this, and surprised to find how modern it feels.  The aim of this course will be to introduce students to these stories, starting with his early works and leading up to a reading of large sections of his most famous project, The Canterbury Tales.  Chaucer's poetry offers a window onto an usually exciting moment of political, cultural and philosophical transformations, and we will read these works with close attention to the society and culture in which they were produced.  Students will also acquire a familiarity with Chaucer's Middle English.  Requirements will include a short paper, midterm and final exam.

English 4520.01: Shakespeare
Instructor: 
Luke WIlson
Critical examination of the works, life, theater, and contexts of Shakespeare. 
Prereq: 6 cr hrs in English at 2000-3000 level, or permission of instructor. 5 qtr cr hrs of 367 or 6 sem cr hrs of 2367 in any subject are acceptable towards the 6 cr hrs. Not open to students with credit for 520 or 520.01.

English 4520.02: Special Topics in Shakespeare — The Tempest and its Afterlives
Instructor: 
Hannibal Hamlin
Shakespeare is the most widely known and most influential author ever to have written in English, or perhaps any language. Many of his plays have been performed continually over the last four centuries, and they have been adapted into every artistic medium imaginable, in languages and cultures across the world: novels, plays, poems, films, ballets, operas, and comics.

This course will begin with an intensive study of Shakespeare's magical desert island Romance "The Tempest" in its own time (being performed this spring by the English Department's Lord Denney's Players), as well as its background in tales of New World encounters (including Montaigne's essay "On Cannibals"), utopian fantasies, and stories of sorcerers and magic. We'll then sample some of its fascinating afterlives: Thomas Shadwell's Restoration opera, "The Enchanted Island;" Aime Cesaire's postcolonial Caribbean play, "Une tempete" (and Roberto Fernandez Retamar's influential essay, "Caliban: Notes Toward a Discussion of Culture in Our America"); W.H. Auden's long poem "The Sea and the Mirror," and shorter poems by Robert Browning, Kamau Brathwaite, and Safiya Sinclair; "The Diviners" by Canadian novelist Margaret Laurence; and two very different films, the sci-fi classic "The Forbidden Planet" and Peter Greenaway's postmodern fantasy, "Prospero's Books."

 

English 4522: Renaissance Poetry — The Faerie Queene
Instructor: Sarah Neville
Dragons. Knights. Swordfights. Magicians. Princesses. Satyrs. Tournaments of Champions. King Arthur. Giants. Enchantresses. Secret meanings. Symbolism. Righteous English patriotism. A desperate plea for patronage. And that's just the first book. Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene is a rollicking adventure story, a powerful national epic, a searching philosophical meditation and guide for moral conduct, a profound exploration of renaissance theology, a pointed critique of traditional attitudes toward gender and class, a wildly imaginative work of fantasy, and a deeply beautiful poem unto itself.  This is unquestionably one of the most fascinating and complex works in all of English literature. In this course we will read the whole poem - all six books and change - paying special attention to historical questions about gender, class, politics, science, and religion. Reading all of The Faerie Queene is a major accomplishment that few people ever attempt. Publishers' Weekly named it one of the Top Ten Most Difficult Books, making it the Everest climb on an English major's bucket list and lifelong bragging rights. Are you brave enough to take the challenge? Students will be evaluated by reading quizzes, short essays, and a final creative project.

English 4523: Special Topics in Renaissance Literature and Culture — The Intersectional Renaissance
Instructor: Jennifer Higginbotham
This course will focus on the intersection of race, class, gender, sexuality, religion, nationality, and other identity categories in Renaissance literature. Using theories of intersectionality, we will examine texts such as the first original play published by an Englishwoman, early works of science fiction such as Margaret Cavendish's The Blazing World, Shakespeare's poems, and travel narratives.

English 4535: Special Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth Century British Literature and Culture — The Invention of Celebrity
Instructor:
David Brewer
This course will investigate the invention of celebrity (and celebrities) over the course of the eighteenth century, generously defined.  Fame has been around since antiquity; celebrity began sometime between 1660 and 1820.  In so doing, we'll try to get a new vantage point from which to assess our own culture of celebrity.  Some of what we'll be considering will seem quite familiar, despite all the wigs.  Some of it will seem deeply weird, perhaps even alien or off-putting.  Either way, though, you should come away from this course with not only a fresh sense of both the eighteenth century and our present moment, but also the often twisted and counter-intuitive connections between the two.  For better or worse, we are the heirs of the eighteenth century in far more ways than just our political system.

We will range widely in our readings and viewings.  Among the issues and areas we'll consider are plays and their performers (including the ways in which actors bring the ghosts of their former parts to their new roles), politics (royalty are in many ways the first celebrities), portraiture (from high-end paintings by the likes of Reynolds and Gainsborough on down to cheap woodcuts), and prostitution (a surprising number of early celebrities were at least at the fringes of the sex trade).  We'll also consider what light this can all shed on the emergence of novelistic characters (some of whom became every bit as well known as flesh-and-blood celebrities) and on the advent of authorial celebrity:  mostly notably that of Shakespeare (200 years after his birth) and Byron.

English 4540: Nineteenth-Century British Poetry 
Instructor:
David Riede
We will focus on the major British poets of the nineteenth century, embracing both the Romantic and Victorian periods. In addition to reading the works carefully in their historical contexts, we will study distinctive characteristics of each period and particularly the continuation and modification of Romanticism in the Victorian period. Poets considered will include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning and others. Requirements: brief presentation, active participation in class discussion, several short in-class essays, one short research paper (4-6 pages).  The textbook for the class is The Longman Anthology of British Literature, volume B (Second Compact Edition).

English 4542—The Nineteenth-Century British Novel
Instructor:
Clare Simmons
Victorian Britons  loved novels. In the Victorian period, the novel became the dominant literary form in Britain, providing a means both to express cultural anxieties and to escape them.  A loose theme for this course is the representation of social class in the novel, raising such questions as how novels delineate class distinctions; the respective roles of men and women in society; and the representation of outsiders.  We will consider not only what story is told, but also how the story is told, and how the novel form responds to both material and cultural changes over the course of the nineteenth century. 

English 4549—Modern Drama
Instructor:
Francis Donoghue
This course will survey some of the most important plays of the twentieth-century.  We'll begin with two works by the Irish playwright, George Bernard Shaw, Pygmalion and Major Barbara.  Then we'll move to the U.S. and read Lillian Hellman's The Children's Hour, Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin in the Sun, Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman, Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?  We'll then read David Mamet's Glengarry Glen Ross and Oleanna, and conclude with Margaret Edson's Wit.

Throughout the course, we will conduct a variety of interactive exercises designed to underscore the unique features of drama as a genre.  Most important among these is that plays performed on stage entail layers of interpretation.  The author "merely" writes the play, sometimes, but not always offering detailed stage directions.  Then the producer and director make an assortment of decisions about how the sets should look, how the play should be cast, and even whether the text of the play should be kept intact or amended.  Finally, each actor must make a host of interpretive decisions about the character that he or she plays.  We will examine these layers in class, look at adaptations, and work through these issues in class.

 

English 4551: Special Topics in 19th-Century U.S. Literature — Work and Class Inequality
Instructor: Andrea Williams
The U.S. often has been considered a "classless" society, in which individuals earn rather than inherit their status. But does this characterization fully explain disparities in Americans' wealth, health and employment? This course examines how nineteenth-century American writers wrestled with questions of class inequality and social mobility in their fiction. What defines "honorable" work and a "good living," especially amid conditions of slave labor, child labor, women's work, and industrialization? How do race and gender impact people's chances for upward mobility? Can literature about class difference actually motivate social reform?

We will read works by Edith Wharton, Charles Chesnutt, William Dean Howells, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton, Jack London and others. Written assignments may include two short response papers (5 pages), discussion posts to CARMEN, quizzes, and a final essay (8-10 pages).

English 4553: 20th-Century U.S. Fiction
Instructor:
Mark Conroy
Course will examine the shifts in American literary fiction between the close of World War One and the 'sixties.  Hemingway (probably "In Our Time"), Fitzgerald ("Tender Is the Night"), Willa Cather ("The Professor's House"), Zora Neale Hurston ("Their Eyes Were Watching God"), and Nathanael West ("Miss Lonelyhearts") would account for the interwar years; John Cheever's stories, Vladimir Nabokov ("Lolita"), probably Walker Percy ("The Moviegoer") and perhaps Richard Yates ("Revolutionary Road") for the postwar 'fifties.  Brief papers, possibly three, with an oral report and a final, are the likely assignments.

English 4553: 20th-Century U.S. Fiction
Instructor:
Francis Donoghue
This will be a very unconventional approach to this very popular course in the English department's curriculum.  We will first read each of the main texts - Theodore Dreiser's Sister Carrie, F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, Walter Tevis' The Hustler, and Patricia Highsmith's The Talented Mr. Ripley - conventionally:  analyzing the novels' plots, characters, central themes - just as you would expect from any upper level English course.  However, once we've covered each novel we will then consider it as if it were a case study in a graduate level business course.  That is, we will ask:  "Did major characters make optimal decisions, and if they didn't, what else might they have done?"  We will, in other words, first talk about the novels in a way typical of English studies, and then talk about them in a way that engages the analytical tools and rhetoric of a very different academic discipline.  English and business may inhabit independent schools at Ohio State, but we need to remind ourselves that we are also part of the same university. 

English 4554: English Studies and Global Human Rights — Human Rights and Environmental Justice
Instructor:
Thomas Davis
Do we have a right to more fossil fuels if their use will make the planet less inhabitable for future generations?  Should we be having children in the era of climate change?  Should the nation-states historically responsible for the majority of carbon emissions pay reparations to the poorer states suffering from a warming planet?  How do we address environmental racism? What do the wars, revolutions, and refugee crises across the globe have to do with the environment? 

The most contested human rights issues of our young century overlap with our ongoing environmental crisis and, in the process, force us to rethink the "human" and the concept of "rights."  To approach these questions, we will focus on a global archive of fiction, creative non-fiction, activist events, philosophy, and artistic production. 

English 4559: Introduction to Narrative and Narrative Theory
Instructor:
Amy Shuman
Stories give shape to our everyday life experiences.  We tell stories about ourselves, about others, about trivial interactions that fade from memory, and about life changing events.  In this course we explore who tells stories to whom and in what contexts.  We'll examine narrative form, genre, performance, repertoire and interaction. 

English 4560: Special Topics in Poetry — Alternative Rock Lyrics as Poems
Instructor:
Elizabeth Renker
Before the twentieth century, poetry was as popular as music is today. Close links between these forms of art date back to the ancient world. The term "lyric," which now describes a kind of first-person "subjective" poem, originally comes from a stringed musical instrument, the lyre.  One of poetry's oldest terms for itself is "song."  Our class explores the intersections between these sibling art forms.  We will study song lyrics as themselves a vital part of the history of poetry.  Our method will be to pair poems written over the past four centuries with recent songs that explore similar themes or forms.  For example, we might pair Arcade Fire with T.S. Eliot; St. Vincent with Robert Frost; John Donne with The Smiths; Emily Dickinson with Talking Heads; Neutral Milk Hotel with Edwin Arlington Robinson; The Antlers with Stars; Jackson Mac Low with Animal Collective; or Sharon Olds with Radiohead.

Over the course of the semester, class sessions will also include several videoconference sessions with working musicians from the local and national scenes who will talk to us about writing lyrics and about our interpretations of their songs. We will also review various schools of interpretation and literary theory in English studies and consider their implications for our analyses.  I will send a poll to all enrolled students prior to the start of term so that I can integrate some student suggestions about bands and songs into our syllabus.  Students have suggested that it would be helpful for me to include an introduction to the basics of poetic form, such as how to detect and identify meter, so we will learn and review those concepts and continue to practice with examples as our class progresses.

English 4563: Contemporary Literature — Literature of the 20th and 21st Centuries
Instructor: Jessica Prinz
We will read broadly in the area of 20th and 21st Century fiction, focusing on the theme of science. Although "science fiction" is a genre devoted to science and its  fusion with literature, we will be looking at other genres as well, as we explore some of the central concerns and  themes of the period. Among works that may be considered are: Pynchon, "The Crying of Lot 49"; Zadie Smith,"White Teeth"; Egan, "A Visit from the Good Squad"; Delillo, "White Noise"  Calvino, "If on a Winter's Night a Traveler" -- and stories by many other excellent writers, including Kurt Vonnegut,Don Delillo, and William Gibson. Some writing and exams (and especially participation) will be required.

English 4565: Advances Fiction Writing
Instructor:
Memory Risinger
To quote John Gardner, "Fiction does not spring into the world fully grown, like Athena.  It is the process of writing and rewriting that makes a fiction original, if not profound."  This advanced course will seek out that originality by focusing on the writing and rewriting process.  Students who enroll in 4565 will write two new, original short stories and revise one.  They will also participate in a weekly workshop and complete weekly writing exercises. Admission to English 4565 is by permission of instructor only. To be considered, please submit a sample of your best work (20 pages max) to risinger.15@osu.edu by December 1st. I will contact you regarding your enrollment status as soon as possible after the deadline.

English 4566—Advanced Poetry Writing
Instructor: 
Zoe Thompson
Advanced workshop in the writing of poetry. This is a class for serious students of creative writing. Admission is by portfolio submission to the instructor. Prereq: 2266 and permission of instructor. Not open to students with 9 sem cr hrs of 4566 and/or 4566E. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

English 4568—Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor: 
Lee Martin
The focus of this course will be the study and practice of the craft of literary nonfiction in a workshop setting. We'll consider matters of narrative structure, scene construction, dialogue, pacing, reflection, persona, voice, reportage, fragmentation, and other issues relevant to our consideration of craft. Always, we'll ask the question, "What makes this essay memorable?" I'll ask each student to present two essays for workshop discussion. Students should be ready to participate in the workshop discussions by preparing written comments on the essays under consideration. Not only will I expect students to write comments on the workshop copies, I'll also ask that they prepare a written summary letter to be given to each writer at the end of the workshop discussion.  At the end of the semester, I'll ask each student to turn in a significantly revised version of one of the two essays that he or she presented to the workshop. To be considered for this course, please submit a writing sample-a complete essay of no more than 20 pages-to Professor Lee Martin at martin.1199@osu.edu by November 23, 2016.


English 4569: Digital Media and English Studies — Digital Messaging and Storytelling
Instructor: Scott DeWitt
This course will take up the study of digital media and its relationship to messaging and storytelling. Students from across areas in the Department of English or in majors outside of English will work on a series of short form digital projects using rich media.  The most significant part of this course focuses on the "P" word:  Production.  This course is structured mostly as a studio class, where we will be working together in one of the Digital Media Project's classrooms.  Some of you may have experience with the technologies we will compose with.  For those of you new to these technologies, I will teach you more than you need to know to be successful in this class.  Please do not let your lack of experience with technology intimidate you. 

You will not be asked to purchase a textbook for this class.  Also, you will have access to cameras, audio recorders, and computers from The Digital Media Project.  You may need to spend a small amount of money on materials (things like batteries, for example).  I will strongly (perhaps I should say "very strongly") recommend that you purchase an external hard drive for which you will find a great deal of use after this class ends.  I will advise you on this purchase once class begins. This class can be used to fulfill the Digital Media requirement in the Writing, Rhetoric, and Literacy concentration for the English Major.


English 4571: Studies in the English Language — The Sociolinguistics of Talk
Instructor: 
Gabriella Modan
The dinnertable conversations, class discussions, chats while exercising, arguments, and joking that we engage in every day are rich with pattern and meaning. This course is an introduction to the analysis of spoken language, with a focus on ordinary conversation. The course will not help you to become a better public speaker. Instead, you will learn about the mechanics of conversation: how do we start and end conversations, decide when it's our turn to talk, show politeness or interest, create identities for ourselves and others through our talk?

With a focus on face-to-face interaction, we'll examine how speakers utilize social context in talk and exploit language in order to achieve their goals, as well as how their goals sometimes get thwarted, in everyday settings. Topics covered include turn-taking and interruption, politeness, discourse markers such as "like" and 'y'know', cross-cultural communication, and language and power.

English 4572: Traditional Grammar and Usage 
Instructor:
Lauren Squires
You will learn to describe and analyze the structure of English sentences, acquiring technical terminology and the skills needed to represent sentence structure through diagrams. Rather than memorizing and applying rules for "correct" English, you will become familiar with the concepts and patterns of grammar from a linguistic -- a scientific -- perspective. The focus of the class is not "how to write well" or "how to have good grammar." Instead, we will seek to understand the linguistic principles that underlie all speaking and writing in English. This will ultimately equip students with the skills to more critically understand speaking and writing style, including "good writing" and products designed to encourage it, such as usage handbooks.

English 4573.02: Rhetoric and Social Action 
Instructor: 
Nancy Johnson
In this course, we will examine how rhetoric ( persuasion) is used  to  motivate social action and change.  Our central questions will be: How does social and cultural change happen? Why do people change their minds about beliefs and values? We will examine a range of rhetorical strategies used in social movements  including non-fiction, popular culture,  forms of rhetorical protest and performance,  film, fiction, poetry, oratory, pamphlets, posters, advertisements, periodicals, web communication systems, legal action, and music. Crucial concerns such as context, age, race, gender, region, historical period, ethnicity, and life style will also be stressed as major considerations in rhetorical analysis, a method that reveals how arguments work and why.

English 4578: Special Topics in Film 
Instructor: 
Mark Conroy
Course plans to explore the various ways in which Hollywood film has depicted the relationship between criminal acts and punishment.  Sections to include the classic age of crime, the 'forties ("Double Indemnity," "Mildred Pierce," "Out of the Past"); neo-gangster film ("Bonnie and Clyde," "GoodFellas," "Godfather II"); celebrity culture and criminality ("Taxi Driver," "To Die For," "Sunset Blvd," "The Player"); and a separate Hitchcock section ("Shadow of a Doubt," "Strangers on a Train," 'The Wrong Man").  Texts will include Naremore's "More than Night."  Assignments: two short papers, a longer paper, and a final.

English 4578: Special Topics in Film — Television, Narrative, Seriality
Instructor: 
Sean O'Sullivan
This course will consider central questions of televisual art and narrative, focusing on the first seasons of three recent series: The Wire, Mad Men, and Orange Is the New Black.  What are the basic narrative practices and structures of television - and serial television in particular?  How are storyworlds created?  What are the strategies and effects of devices such as the episode and the season?  How does character operate within television narrative?  How does televisual storytelling organize space and time?  What are the consequences of genre conventions and audience responses?  A recurring subject for the class will be the tension between the episodic and the serial - between individual aesthetic experiences and sprawling fictional universes. 

English 4580: Special Topics in LGBTQ Literatures and Cultures — Reading Race and Sexuality
Instructor: Martin Ponce
This course considers the difference that race makes when thinking about the possibilities and limitations of "queer" as an analytical framework, category of identification, and basis for political activism. Through readings of 20th and 21st literary and scholarly texts, we will explore the following questions: How have racial difference and sexual deviance been mutually connected in colonial, sexological, and state discourses? How have ethnic and indigenous writers challenged these histories of European and U.S. colonialism, racialization, and gender and sexual violence? To what extent has the mainstreaming of gay and lesbian politics since the 1980s been predicated on a separation of sexuality from racial difference and devaluation? In what ways have these homonormative aspirations impacted not only racial others in the U.S. but also queer formations and politics in other parts of the world? Possible authors include: Kazim Ali, James Baldwin, Alison Bechdel, Alexander Chee, Thomas Glave, Nella Larsen, Audre Lorde, Deborah Miranda, Janet Mock, Shani Mootoo, Richard Bruce Nugent, Monique Truong, Jose Garcia Villa, Edmund White, Craig Womack. Requirements: attendance, participation, two short presentations, one close-reading paper, one research project.

English 4583: Special Topics in World Literature in English — Young, Brash, Wordly, &, African: the Afropolitan Writers
Instructor: Adeleke Adeeko
This class will focus on fiction and poetry (written and spoken) by Anglophone writers of African descent who came of age in the last decade and termed themselves Afropolitans because their lives range over continents -mainly North America and Europe - and their cultural and artistic preoccupations refuse to leave Africa alone. We will read stories and poems by Chimamanda Adichie, Helen Oyewumi, Taye Sellasie, Doreen Baingana, Chris Abani, and Dinaw Mengestu. We will also analyze one or two "Nollywood" movies and a few Hip-Life recordings. Students will be expected to attend classes regularly and punctually, participate in class discussions, and write three papers.

English 4591.01H: Special Topics in the Study of Creative Writing — The Devil is in the Lit: from Dante's Inferno to Hellboy
Instructor: Lina Ferreira
This course is a seminar on the devil in literature with a creative writing component. A semester long exploration of the literary nature of evil, horror, rebellion and subversion through the recurring satanic metaphor in texts ranging from Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita, to Milton's Paradise Lost and Mignola's Hellboy.

English 4592: Special Topics in Women in Literature and Culture
Roxann Wheeler

Using feminist perspectives, students will learn to analyze literature and other cultural works (film, television, digital media) written by or about women. Time period and topic vary.
Prereq: 10 qtr cr hrs or 6 cr hrs of English at 2000-3000 level, or permission of instructor. 5 qtr cr hrs in 367 or 3 cr hrs in 2367 in any subject is acceptable towards the 6 cr hrs. Not open to students with 10 qtr cr hrs for 592. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.

English 4597.02: American Regional Cultures in Transition — Appalachia, Louisiana, and the Texas Border Country
Instructor: Dorothy Noyes
This course will introduce you to the folklore of three American regions. Each is famous for its traditional culture, but each is often thought of as deviating in a distinctive way from the national culture: Louisiana is "creole," Texas is "border," and Appalachia is "folk." While exploring these differences, we'll also observe the commonalities: positive and negative stereotyping from outside, complex racial and class composition, heavy in- and out-migration, environmental distinctiveness and stress, extraction economies, tense and often violent relationships with both government and business. We'll look at historical change through the prism of celebrated folklore forms such as Louisiana Mardi Gras, Appalachian fairy tales, and the Tex-Mex corrido. We'll also explore the impact of Hurricane Katrina and the reconstruction of the Gulf Coast, mountaintop-removal mining and the energy economy in Appalachia, and the cross-border trafficking of people, drugs, and capital.  A general question arises: what counts as America?


5000-level

 

English 5664: Studies in Graphic Narrative — Graphic Medicine
Instructor: Jared Gardner

Stories about illness-physical and mental-have emerged as a major focus in contemporary graphic narrative. Meanwhile, we have seen the rise of the relatively new field of narrative medicine, which brings together medical practitioners, patients, storytellers and narratologists to revitalize the increasingly lost art in medicine of engaging with and being moved by patients' stories as a central aspect of what it means to be a physician. The result of these related forces as been the emergence of what is called "graphic medicine," which explores the relationship between the unique affordances of graphic storytelling and the experiences and discourses of healthcare as both patient and caregiver. We'll be reading graphic memoir and fiction about illness, recovery and the landscapes in between, from Justin Green's BINKY BROWN (1972) to John Porcellino's HOSPITAL SUITE (2014) - as well as readings in comics theory, narrative medicine, and criticism.

 

English 5892—Workshop — Alt-Ac Workshop Series (Part II)
Instructor:
Cecily Hill
Session Four: Looking for Alt-Ac Jobs. Where do you even start looking for alt-ac jobs? This session will cover the basics of searching for jobs in a number of different industries. Using a computer lab, we'll start by looking at databases and move on to individual searching. To close, we'll discuss some of our more interesting finds and deconstruct the job requirements. This session will cover:

  1. Job search websites and resources.
  2. LinkedIn
  3. Informational Interviews (Part Two)

Session Five: Resumes and Cover Letters. Resumes look nothing like CVs, and transitioning to them can be daunting. In this session, we'll discuss how to translate common academic skills into bullet points. We will also go over the rhetorical moves common to non-academic cover letters.

Session Eight: Seriously, You Aren't Alone. Leaving the academy can be tough - even when you are prepared for it. This session deals with how to cope with inevitable change: how to maintain and rebuild a community, how to find writing and research groups.