Education Abroad

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LITERARY LOCATIONS

Literary Locations, the Department of English's summer study abroad program, enables students to study the art and history of a location while also living there for a month over the summer. Through the program, students will take a three credit hour course which focuses on a specific contribution of a particular city to the world. As a part of the course, students will visit sites and engage in activities relevant to the course subject like seeing plays, visiting art galleries and taking literary/historical walks in London. The Literary Locations program offers students the opportunity to earn upper-level credit, which can be applied to their English majors, English minors or overall university degrees. 

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A city of labyrinthine canals and alleys — known for its vast wealth and mix of Eastern and Western art and architecture, but also for its courtesans, conmen, casinos and Carnival — Venice has for centuries inspired tales of cultural conflict, sexual intrigue, magic and mystery, decay and death. See the city that fired the imaginations of Shakespeare and Ben Johnson, and that both fascinated and disturbed writers like John Ruskin and Henry James. Visit the prison in the Doge's Palace that  held Casanova, the beaches where Thomas Mann's Aschenbach roams in Death in Venice and the insane asylum on the island of San Servolo where Jeanette Winterson's The Passion ends. 

This spring 2020 course, taught by Professor Alan Farmer, will examine the representation of Venice in works of English and European literature from the 16th to the twentieth century.  


Program dates

The Venice trip is a dual course experience:

  • English 4400: Literary Locations — Students who wish to go on the Venice trip must first take this course in spring 2020. This course is offered on the Columbus campus. 

  • English 5193: Individual Studies — Students must also enroll in one credit hour of this course in summer 2020. This credit hour will cover the actual Venice trip, which will run from May 1 to May 13, 2020.


Application deadline

The application deadline for this course has passed


Want to learn more?

Program application, costs and accommodation information is available through the Office of International Affairs.


Apply for scholarships

The following are study abroad scholarships that we strongly encourage you to apply for:


Questions?

Contact Study Abroad Program Coordinator Louise Yahiaoui (.2).

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MAY IN LONDON

The summer study abroad program in London, offered in the May session, enables students to study the art and history of London while also living there for a month over the summer. Through the program, students will take a three credit hour course which focuses on a specific contribution of a particular city to the world, for example: The Literature of London—London on Stage and Screen. As a part of the course, students will visit sites and engage in activities relevant to the course subject like seeing plays, visiting art galleries and taking literary/historical walks in London.

This program offers students the opportunity to earn upper-level credit, which can be applied to English majors, English minors or overall university degrees.

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Taught by Professor Beverly Moss (.1), students will explore the Black presence in London-based literature and culture and representations of Blackness across literary genres and media from the perspectives of Black British writers and artists. Zak Ové, British artist and curator, suggests that "Britain's cultural institutions are more open than ever before to Black British culture and the artists behind it."

Central questions that participants will consider include: What are the stories emerging about the Black presence in London across genres and media? How do those stories compare and contrast in autobiographies, fiction, archival artifacts, museum exhibits and theatre performances? What is the impact of the venue, genre and audience on how the stories are told? 

This experience is based in London with an excursion to Bristol, significant for its slave history and contemporary Black art scene. 


Program dates

May 5 to May 29, 2020


Application deadline

The application deadline for this course has passed


Program application, costs and accommodations

Information about program costs, accomodations and the application process is available through the Office of International Affairs. Note: Under OIA, this program is called Literature and Culture of London. 


Apply for scholarships

The following are study abroad scholarships that we strongly encourage you to apply for:


Questions?

Contact Study Abroad Program Coordinator Louise Yahiaoui (.2).

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GLOBAL MAY

Global May programs are offered by the Office of International Affairs, though some are led by English faculty. These programs are unique in that they are specifically intended for first- and second-year students of any major, allowing students to begin their global education early in their college careers. All programs are led by Ohio State faculty, feature instruction in English and, with the exception of the India Global Summer program, take place over May session. Each Global May program will allow students to explore the history, culture, current events and major issues of its titular country. 

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Ever wondered why Britain thinks it's 'Great,' why there is still a queen or what on earth is cricket? Then you might like a class in which you will not only learn how to bowl a googlie, sip tea and speak proper English, but have the chance to explore the history, politics and culture of the country in which you will be living for four weeks. While gaining a sense of the broad sweep of British history, students will try to figure out how a country that sees itself as the birthplace of Parliamentary Democracy still has a royal family and well-defined social classes. Students will also see how quintessentially-English customs like cricket and tea drinking are closely tied to Britain's Imperial past — a past that is everywhere in London's buildings and statues, but also explains why so many people in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland refuse to think of themselves as British. Readings will be wide ranging, but will draw heavily on poetry, plays and short fiction. Morning seminars will be followed by afternoon historic walks and field trips to relevant museums and sites of interest. There is also a long-weekend trip to Edinburgh. The program is especially designed for first- and second-year students of any major.

By participating in this program, students will learn to question and think critically about issues relating to diversity and inclusion, national identity and the social-political issues affecting their peers in the United Kingdom. Reflection will be through guided discussion and a combination of regular journal and blog posts.


Locations

The program is based in London. Bloomsbury, Highgate is a centrally located historic neighborhood in one of the world's most vibrant and cosmopolitan cities. As the great Dr. Johnson put it: "When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford." Having said that, we will make several trips outside the city, including a long-weekend in Edinburgh, Scotland.


Accommodations

Students will live with other students in self-contained and fully furnished apartments in central London. Participants will share their bedroom with another Ohio State student. A fully equipped kitchen, complete with stove, refrigerator, oven and microwave, utensils and crockery/cutlery is included. Bed linens are provided. Students are expected to bring their own towels.


Resident director

Chris Highley (.1), Department of English
 


Ohio State program contact

Louise Yahiaoui (.2)
If you would like to schedule an appointment, please click here.

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GLOBAL HUMAN RIGHTS AND ENGLISH STUDIES

Global Human Rights and English Studies and its accompanying trip are part of the Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme. Students who wish to participate will enroll in a three credit course, English 4554 for May 2020, after which, they will embark on a two week-long trip abroad. 

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With the city of London as its focus, this Education Abroad course will explore global migration in the context of the current crisis around refugees. Framed around five key terms — migration, suspicion, crisis, exhaustion and fusion — we will study cultural representations (art, literature, film, theatre, exhibitions and photography) with an emphasis on London’s rich history of immigration and present emphases on national security. We will study national and international policies and debates and meet with London organizations that work with refugees.

This course will be led by Wendy S. Hesford and Amy Shuman. Wendy S. Hesford is a professor of English and the faculty director of the Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme. Hesford is interested in the transformative role that critical human rights literacy plays in exposing the violence of representation, revealing hidden, repressed and silenced stories. Amy Shuman is a professor of English and specializes in narrative, literacy, political asylum, disability, food customs, feminist theory and critical theory. 

To participate, students must enroll in English 4554: Global Human Rights and English Studies (SU'20) for three credit hours. 


Course dates

This is a two-week course that will take place during summer session I, from May 9 to 24, 2020.


Application deadline

The application deadline for this opportunity has passed


Questions?

Email Puja Batra-Wells (.1) or schedule an appointment with an English advisor.