Second-Year Writing Curriculum

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The Second-Year Writing (SYW) Program in the Department of English at The Ohio State University offers eight sections of second-level writing instruction, each with different themes, such as “writing about video games” or “writing about documentaries.” Only one 2367 decimal subdivision may be taken for credit. Prerequisites include: 1110.01 (110.01) or equivalent, and Soph standing; or EM credit for 1110.01 (110.01) or equivalent; or a declared major in English.  

Note: With the new GE requirements, SYW offers a set of courses that will fulfill the “Advanced Writing” requirement. The exception is “Literature in the U.S. Experience” (2367.02) which fulfills the foundations requirement for “Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts.” Students enrolled beginning Autumn 2022 will be following the new GE requirements. Please check with your advisor about which iteration to enroll in. 

Below is a list and description of each 2367 course offering: 

Advanced
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In this section of 2367, students refine their skills in synthesizing information, creating arguments about a variety of discursive, visual, and/or cultural artifacts, and become more proficient with and sophisticated in their research strategies and employment of the conventions of standard academic discourses. Students extend and refine expository writing and analytical reading skills, growing as communicators by producing and interpreting diverse forms of information for various audiences. This course emphasizes student reflection, research, and composing strategies focused on issues of diversity, education, and popular culture in the United States.   

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In this section of 2367, students interpret and evaluate works of literature (both written and multimedia), enhancing their critical listening, reading, seeing, thinking, and writing skills. Students refine their analytical, research, and composing skills practiced in previous writing courses. This course emphasizes researched writing, revision, and composing in various forms and media. In addition, students improve their proficiency in academic writing by analyzing, interpreting, and critiquing significant literary works using secondary sources. Through reading, discussing, and writing about literature, students appraise and evaluate the personal and social values of their own and others’ cultures.  

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In this section of 2367, students practice skills in critical reading and expository writing through analysis of the documentary genre and format. Students will learn narrative principles that generate various documentary formats and evaluate these texts to understand how information gets constructed and manipulated for different audiences. Students will utilize a variety of documentary formats, from “traditional” documentaries to mockumentaries and reality television, to gain an understanding of how narratives make universal claims in U.S. society about race, sexuality, history, and more. Students use these expositions to expand and refine their academic writing skills using secondary sources to synthesize information and create arguments about how documentaries represent the U.S. experience. 

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In this section of 2367, students explore the extent to which technological advancement impacts and shapes our society, culture, and relationships. Students examine a variety of texts that depict how the integration of technology and science in the U.S. impacts various communities differently and analyze the larger social/political conversations these representations present. Students build their composing skills through various oral and written communication forms and critically analyze primary and secondary sources relevant to the course theme. In this course, students practice and build their skills in rhetorical analysis, through which they learn how to apply reflection and analysis to wider discussions of dominant trends in shaping American culture and society.  

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In this section of 2367, students explore the academic field of Folklore Studies and how folklorists approach writing and researching across different genres, performances, experiences, and representations. Students gain an understanding of folk narratives and stories via the three main categories of folklore: verbal (songs, folktales, jokes), material (food, quilts, chairs), and customary belief and practice (legends, dances, rituals). Students develop their persuasive, researched, analytical writing skills through composing in various forms where they examine, critique, and employ folklorists’ fieldwork practices in their own writing. Using folklore studies as a lens to evaluate various social aspects (such as race, gender, ability, etc.) in the U.S., students refine their capacity to synthesize information and create arguments about discursive, visual, and/or cultural artifacts. 

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In this section of 2367, students gain knowledge in Disability Studies and refine skills in expository and reflexive writing strategies. Students link Disability narratives to their own composition and critical argumentation about a topic in this field to better understand implicit bias and systemic implications placed on differently-abled/disabled members of U.S. society. By evaluating systemic relations that produce and determine spaces for disabled communities, students will produce written work on contemporary social issues for matters of ability/disability and visible/non-visible disability.  

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In this section of 2367, students focus on collecting and preserving literacy narratives of Columbus’s Black communities. Through engagement with community partners, students refine skills in subject-research composition, synthesis of information/data, and argument construction about discursive/visual/cultural artifacts. Students learn the literacy and life-history narratives of Black Columbus through various interviewing techniques, viewing/listening to life history/literacy narrative recordings, and reflecting on such texts as a medium of community building, artistic invention, and social activism. Using digital audio recorders, digital still cameras, and digital video cameras to record the stories of Black Columbus, students will conduct a series of life-history/literacy narrative interviews with members of the community (the service-learning component of the course) through which they will refine their academic composition skills. 

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In this section of 2367, students will consider dominant U.S. culture through scholarship in video game studies and gaming community artifacts to build upon and improve their proficiency in academic writing. Students also refine skills in critical analysis by investigating gaming culture in the U.S. using various frameworks such as digital literacy and social performance. Using these tools, students will unpack games as narrative texts and consider how they represent character in terms of social diversity. This course explores key rhetorical conversations in the field of game studies where students demonstrate their rhetorical understanding of video game structures and audience participation.  Students do not need prior knowledge of video games or game studies.