Second-Year Writing Program

Second-Year Writing Program Director: Professor Beverly J. Moss

 

The Second-Year Writing Program is the home of English 2367, the second of the Department of English's two General Education Curriculum composition courses required of all Ohio State undergraduates. Because English 2367 follows English 1110 and is generally taken by students in their second year, it offers more challenging and thought-provoking texts and ideas than those in a first-year writing course. 

In this three-hour, second-level writing course for which English 1110 is a prerequisite, students will continue to develop and refine the skills in analysis, research and composition that they practiced in English 1110. This course emphasizes persuasive and researched writing, revision and composing in various forms and media. In addition, students will build upon and improve their mastery of academic writing with and from sources; refine their ability to synthesize information; create arguments about a variety of discursive, visual and/or cultural artifacts; and become more proficient with and sophisticated in research strategies and employment of the conventions of standard academic discourses.


Course Catalog Description

English 2367: Second-Year Writing—Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America.

  • Only one 2367 decimal subdivision may be taken for credit
  • Prerequisite: 1110.01, and sophomore standing; or EM credit for 1110.01 or equivalent

English 2367 Versions

There are eight versions of 2367 offered by the Department of English. All versions satisfy the General Education Credit for Written Communication (Level 2). Some versions also satisfy the GEC for Literature (2367.02) and Social Diversity in the United States (2367.01, .02, .05, .06, .07S, .08).

  • English 2367.01: Language, Identity, and Culture in the U.S. Experience
    GE: Second-Level Writing and Social Diversity in the United States
  • English 2367.02: Literature in the U.S. Experience
    GE: Second-Level Writing and Literature
  • English 2367.03: Documentary in the U.S. Experience
  • GE: Second-Level Writing
  • English 2367.04: Technology and Science in the U.S. Experience
  • GE: Second-Level Writing
  • English 2367.05: The U.S. Folk Experience
    GE: Second-Level Writing and Social Diversity in the United States
  • English 2367.06: Composing Disability in the U.S.
    GE: Second-Level Writing and Social Diversity in the United States
  • English 2367.07S: Literacy Narratives of Black Columbus (service learning)
    GE: Second-Level Writing and Social Diversity in the United States
  • English 2367.08: The U.S. Experience: Writing About Video Games
    GE: Second-Level Writing and Social Diversity in the United States

These sections additionally furnish students with a view of the multi-faceted cultures that comprise the “U.S. Experience,” including issues of race, culture, ethnicity, disability, economic class, social class, gender, sexual orientation, religion and politics. Students learn to analyze their own experiences and perspectives alongside those of others and articulate them in well-reasoned, expository prose.


Learning Outcomes for All Versions of English 2367

Rhetorical Knowledge

Throughout the second writing course, students should build upon the foundational outcomes from the first course. By the end of their first writing course, students should be able to recognize the elements that inform rhetorical situations. This understanding should enable them to produce expository texts that:

  • Have a clear purpose 
  • Respond to the needs of intended audiences 
  • Assume an appropriate stance 
  • Adopt an appropriate voice, tone, style, and level of formality 
  • Use appropriate conventions of format and structure

In addition, by the end of the second course, students should be able to:

  • Analyze argumentative strategies and persuasive appeals 
  • Employ appropriate argumentative strategies and persuasive appeals in their writing

Critical Thinking, Reading and Writing

Throughout the second writing course, students should build upon these foundational outcomes from the first course:

  • Use reading and writing for inquiry, learning, thinking, and communicating
  • Analyze relationships among writer, text, and audience in various kinds of texts
  • Use various critical thinking strategies to analyze texts

In addition, by the end of the second course, students should be able to:

  • Find and evaluate appropriate material from electronic and other sources
  • Analyze and critique sources in their writing
  • Juxtapose and integrate ideas and arguments from sources 
  • Develop a clear line of argument that incorporates ideas and evidence from sources

Knowledge of Composing Processes

Throughout the second writing course, students should build upon these foundational outcomes from the first course:

  • Understand writing as a series of steps that includes generating ideas and text, drafting, revising, and editing
  • Recognize that writing is a flexible, recursive process 
  • Apply this understanding and recognition to produce successive drafts of increasing quality 

Collaboration

Throughout the second writing course, students should build upon these foundational outcomes from the first course:

  • Work with others to improve their own and others’ texts
  • Balance the advantages of relying on others with taking responsibility for their own work 

Knowledge of Conventions

Throughout the second writing course, students should build upon these foundational outcomes from the first course:

  • Employ appropriate conventions for structure, paragraphing, mechanics and format 
  • Acknowledge the work of others when appropriate 
  • Use a standard documentation format as needed 
  • Control syntax, grammar, punctuation and spelling 
  • In addition, by the end of the second course, students should be able to
  • Employ appropriate textual conventions for incorporating ideas from sources, e.g., introducing and incorporating quotations; quoting, paraphrasing and summarizing

Composing In Electronic Environments

Throughout the second writing course, students should build upon these foundational outcomes from the first course:

  • Developments in digital technology are expanding our understanding of writing.

To the extent that technology is available and appropriate, by the end of their first writing course students should be able to:

  • Understand the possibilities of electronic media/technologies for composing and publishing texts
  • Use electronic environments to support writing tasks such as drafting, reviewing, revising, editing, and sharing texts

In addition, by the end of the second course, students should be able to:

  • Locate, evaluate, organize, and use research material collected from various sources, including scholarly library databases, other official databases (e.g., federal government databases) and informal electronic networks and internet sources

Minimum Course Requirements

By the end of their second writing course, students will have written:

  • A variety of texts, including at least one researched essay, with opportunities for response and revision
  • A minimum of 5000 total words (roughly 20 total pages of written work). Electronic or other projects of equivalent rigor and substance may be included, but the primary focus of the course must be the composing of formal written work
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