Spring 2020: 2000-Level Courses

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English 2201H: Selected Works of British Literature—Honors Survey of British Literature, Beowulf to 1800
Instructor: Leslie Lockett 
This course introduces students to some of the major British literary texts written from the early Middle Ages through the late eighteenth century, including Beowulf, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Marlowe's Doctor Faustus, Milton's Paradise Lost and Aphra Behn's Oroonoko. Our approach to the literature will emphasize close reading, form and genre and historical context. Students will develop their research skills by means of a researched essay or creative project. Other requirements include response papers and a final exam. 
GE: Literature 
GE: Diversity (Global Studies) 

English 2202: Selected Works of British Literature1800 to Present 
Instructor: Jill Galvan 
This course will introduce students to some of the major British texts, authors and literary forms and trends of the last two centuries. In the process, you will be learning about diverse perspectives on important cultural developments over the past two centuries, including the French Revolution, the abolition of slavery, the Industrial Revolution, imperialism, debates over gender roles and sexuality, the rise of scientific values, the twentieth-century world wars and the political and cultural consequences of decolonization. We will study major literary modes such as the Romantic lyric, the Gothic novel, the dramatic monologue, World War I poetry, postcolonial narrative and the Bildungsroman (or “coming-of-age novel”). Our fiction and drama will include Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol, Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest and Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go. English 2202 will also familiarize students with college-level strategies for analyzing literature. Main course requirements include two exams and two short papers designed to build your skills in literary interpretation. 
GE: Literature 
GE: Diversity (Global Studies) 

English 2202H: Selected Works of British Literature: 1800 to Present 
Instructor: Jacob Risinger 
A great grand tour of British Literature from the Napoleonic Wars to Brexit, with a special emphasis on the collision of history and literary form. 
GE: Literature 
GE: Diversity (Global Studies) 

English 2220: Introduction to Shakespeare 
Instructors: Christopher Highley 
Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience. 
GE: Literature 
GE: Diversity (Global Studies) 

English 2220H: Introduction to Shakespeare 
Instructor: Luke Wilson 
This course is designed for Honors students as an introduction to the dramatic work of Shakespeare through close study of a sampling of his plays. Our primary concern will be with Shakespeare’s text, but we will also spend some time discussing the conditions of theatrical performance as well as recent film adaptations. Of particular interest will be Shakespeare’s use of sources (he invented almost nothing out of whole cloth and yet managed somehow to be extraordinarily original), and his (kind of astonishing) ability to be at once deeply responsive to the historical moments in which he wrote and endlessly relevant to our own times and lives. Written assignments will encourage you to develop your knowledge of Shakespeare by way of different sets of skills: informal response; close textual and semantic analysis; engagement with secondary (scholarly) discussions of Shakespeare; group work on play performance; a review of a theatrical production; and the production of a substantial critical argument of your own. No prior knowledge of Shakespeare is required. 
GE: Literature 
GE: Diversity (Global Studies) 

English 2260 (20): Introduction to Poetry 
Instructor: Clare Simmons 
This course, which fulfills the General Education literature requirement, will provide an introduction to the types and forms of poetry in English, with a particular emphasis on the ways that poems represent the variety and diversity of human experience. Students will have the opportunity to read a wide selection of poems and to practice skills in close reading, analyzing, discussing and writing about literary works. The main texts will be a selection of classic poems available through Carmen; and The Penguin Anthology of Twentieth-Century American Poetry, edited by Rita Dove. Students will be responsible for regular attendance and participation in classroom discussion and group activities; a reading journal; two short papers; and mid-term and final exams. 
GE: Literature 

English 2260 (30): Introduction to Poetry 
Instructor: Leslie Lockett 
This course introduces students to strategies for understanding and enjoying poetry in English, from Old English elegies through Lin-Manuel Miranda's lyrics to the musical Hamilton. We will learn about the sounds of poetry in the ear and the shapes of poetry on the page; we will discuss social and political uses of poetry; and we will delve into the techniques by which poets imbue their words with multiple layers of meaning. 
GE: Literature 

English 2260 (30): Introduction to Poetry—Ohio Poets 
Instructor: Molly Farrell 
This course explores the flourishing of poetry by writers with a deep connection to Ohio. From James Wright and Paul Lawrence Dunbar to Rita Dove and Hanif Abdurraqib, we will investigate the cultural corners of the state through the work of its acclaimed poets. How do these poems teach us to understand, enjoy, and appreciate poetry? And how does a better understanding of poetry help us to see this particular place in new ways? Beginning in the nineteenth century up to the present day, we will explore various trends in poetic form and gain a sophisticated understanding of poetic terms. Connections to Ohio will work as a lens with which to view larger developments in American poetry, while at the same time we will investigate the ways the state's particular geography and history foster literary experimentation and engagement.  Course requirements include readings, written responses, two exams and a final project. This course fulfills the GE requirement in literature. 
GE: Literature 

English 2260H: Introduction to Poetry 
Instructor: Jill Galvan 
Designed to help students understand and appreciate poetry through an intensive study of a representative group of poems. 
GE: Literature 

English 2261 (10): Introduction to Fiction 
Instructors: Matthew Cariello 
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included. 
GE: Literature

English 2261 (20): Introduction to Fiction 
Instructors: Antony Shuttleworth 
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included. 
GE: Literature 

English 2261 (30): Introduction to Fiction 
Instructors: Matthew Cariello 
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included. 
GE: Literature 

English 2261 (40): Introduction to Fiction 
Instructors: Staff 
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included. 
GE: Literature 

English 2261 (70): Introduction to Fiction—Game of Thrones 
Instructors: Elizabeth Renker 
This class celebrates the conclusion to a beloved HBO series. Even the most dedicated fans might not realize that "Game of Thrones" is also a skilled and complex work of literature tied to a long history of literary concepts and approaches. This class will train you in core analytical methods that will enable newcomers to the series as well as longstanding fans to understand "Game of Thrones" at a deeper level of richness and pleasure. You will also learn the core skills of literary interpretation without a lot of heavy reading assignments. We will focus only on the first two seasons of the HBO series, although all students are required to watch the entire series before our class begins. (We will not read or discuss the books by George R.R. Martin.) Requirements: I have designed this class to address student concerns about GE classes more generally. There will be few written assignments to be handed in; instead, the grade will be based on daily attendance; preparation of daily homework questions; short, quick daily quizzes about the homework; high-participation activities in class; and four short (250 word) written assignments over the course of the semester (from which students can choose among multiple deadlines best for their schedules. Textbooks: an HBO subscription; readings posted on Carmen. 
GE: Literature 

English 2261 (80): Introduction to Fiction 
Instructors: Zoe Brigley Thompson 
2261: This introduction to fiction course will focus on authors from the United States who have a variety of backgrounds. That is, not every author studied will be white. 
GE: Literature 

English 2261 (90): Introduction to Fiction—Thematic Approaches to Literature, Slavery and the Novel 1660-1808 
Instructors: Roxann Wheeler 
During this time period, concepts of slavery shifted from featuring European-born slaves in the Mediterranean to featuring African-born slaves in the Caribbean and Europe.  The course investigates the racial, gender and class dynamics of the storylines of literature during the height of slavery and abolition. 
GE: Literature 

English 2263: Introduction to Film 
Instructor: Sean O'Sullivan 
This course offers an introduction to the language and aesthetics of cinema. In the first part of the course, we will study the basic elements of film grammar, from shot construction to editing to mise-en-scene to sound. In the second part, we will examine how that grammar is used to create different kinds of narratives, including documentaries, and how certain values of storytelling style have been privileged over others. We will use each week?s film as both a case study in the strategic deployment of certain cinematic techniques, and as a specific set of images and sounds that combine to create a unique cinematic expression. Throughout the semester, we will focus on detailed analysis of films, analyzing closely the ways in which the multiple elements of moviemaking come together to make meanings. 
GE: VPA 

English 2264: Introduction to Popular Culture Studies 
Instructor: Staff 
Introduction to the analysis of popular culture texts. 
GE: Cultures & Ideas. 
This is a combined section class. Cross-listed in CompStd. 

English 2265 (10): Introductory Fiction Writing 
Instructors: Sheldon Costa 
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre. 


English 2265 (30): Introductory Fiction Writing 
Instructors: Margaret Sarsfield 
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre. 

English 2265 (40): Introductory Fiction Writing 
Instructors: Krishna Mishra 
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre. 

English 2265 (50): Introductory Fiction Writing 
Instructors: Kirsten Edwards 
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre. 

English 2266 (10): Introductory Poetry Writing 
Instructors: Molly Ortiz 
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, composition and prosody; practice in the writing of poetry; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published poems by established poets. Prereq: 1110. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credit hrs. 

English 2266 (20): Introductory Poetry Writing 
Instructors: Robert Schumaker
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, composition and prosody; practice in the writing of poetry; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published poems by established poets. Prereq: 1110. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credit hrs. 

English 2267: Introduction to Creative Writing 
Instructor: Margaret Brown 
An introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction. Analysis and discussion of student work, with reference to the general methods and scope of all three genres. 

English 2268 (10): Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing 
Instructor: Mia Santiago 
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of creative nonfiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published essays by masters of the many forms of creative nonfiction. 

English 2269: Digital Media Composing 
Instructor: Staff 
A composition course in which students analyze and compose digital media texts while studying complex forms and practices of textual production. 
GE: VPA 

English 2270: Introduction to Folklore 
Instructor: Staff 
Folklore theory and methods explored through engagement with primary sources: folktale, legend, jokes, folksong, festival, belief, art. Folklore Minor course. 
GE: Cultures & Ideas 
This is a combined section class 

English 2276: Arts of Persuasion
Instructor: James Fredal 
Introduces students to the study and practice of rhetoric and how arguments are shaped by technology, media and cultural contexts. 
GE: Cultures & Ideas 

English 2277: Introduction to Disability Studies 
Instructor: Staff 
Foundational concepts and issues in disability studies; introduction to the sociopolitical models of disability. 
GE: Cultures & Ideas 

English 2281: Introduction to African-American Literature 
Instructor: Andrea Williams 
This course explores the richness of African American literary traditions from the 1700s to the present. The class offers a chronological survey of representative African American texts, while considering the context of how each work is written, published, and received by readers. By comparing the readings over the course of the semester, we will be able to trace the themes and styles that African American texts often share, as well as the ways writers expand or revise these patterns to create innovative autobiographies, coming-of-age stories, plays, science fiction and drama. 
GE: Literature 
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.) 
This is a combined lecture class. Cross-listed in AfAmASt 


English 2290: Colonial and U.S. Literature to 1865 
Instructors: Elizabeth Hewitt 
In this course, we will consider the relationship between literature and nationalism: how is literature used to establish national identity? What happens when the laws and practices of the nation contradict the stories told about it? What happens to national stories when citizens disagree? Can people who are not afforded citizenship help write national myths? We will approach these and other questions by reading work from before the United States was a nation until its division during the Civil War. We will explore how essayists, politicians, novelists, and poets addressed a broad array of historical, cultural, and literary concerns, including settlement, revolution, slavery, diversity, religion, equality and others. 

English 2367.01: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience 
Instructor: Staff 
Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America. 
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two) 
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.) 

English 2367.01 (120): Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience 
Instructor: Eddie Singleton 
Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America. 
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two) 
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.) 

English 2367.02 (100): Literature in the U.S. Experience 
Instructor: Staff 
Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience. 
GE: Literature 
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two) 
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.) 

English 2367.03: Documentary in the U.S. Experience 
Instructor: Staff 
An intermediate course that extends and refines skills in critical reading and expository writing through analysis of written texts, video and documentaries. 
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two) 

English 2367.06: Composing Disability in the US 
Instructor: Staff 
Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America. 

English 2367.07S: Literacy Narratives of Black Columbus 
Instructor: Staff 
This service-learning course focuses on collecting and preserving literacy narratives of Columbus-area Black communities. Through engagement with community partners, students refine skills in research, analysis and composition; students synthesize information, create arguments about discursive/visual/cultural artifacts and reflect on the literacy and life-history narratives of Black Columbus. 

English 2367.08: The US Experience: Writing About Video Games 
Instructor: Staff 
In this course, we will play and think critically about video games through the lens of race and gender. We will consider issues of representation in games and also in films about/that include video game aesthetics. No gaming experience necessary! 

English 2463: Introduction to Video Games Analysis 
Instructor: Staff 
An introduction to humanities-based methods of analyzing and interpreting video games in terms of form, genre, style and theory. No background in video game play is necessary. All students will have regular opportunities for hands-on experience with different game types and genres in both the computer-based classroom and the Department of English Video Game Lab. 
GE: VPA 

English 2464: Introduction to Comic Studies 
Instructor: Jared Gardner 
This class introduces students to the history, forms, and study of graphic storytelling.  We will approach comics as a medium  which expresses stories and ideas across a wide range of genres using a blend of text and images.  Beginning by learning the grammar of comics and the terminology for how comics texts achieve their effects, we will study the ways comics are made and the ways they are received readers and fans. The range of texts will include newspaper comic strips, comic books, graphic novels and memoirs, manga, web comics and experimental comics. Requirements will include one in-class group presentation, short blog assignments (including at least one involving research at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum), a final paper and lots of lively discussion. 
GE: VPA 
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