Spring 2019: 3000-Level Courses

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English 3271 (20): Structure of the English Language
Instructor:
Gabriella Modan
This course is an introduction to English linguistics. We will learn about the basic characteristics of language: the sounds of English and how they're put together, word formation processes, and rules for combining words into utterances/sentences.  While studying how the basic building blocks of language work, we will also investigate linguistic variation, accents of American English, and language and education.  Finally, we'll explore how standard and non-standard varieties of English get evaluated in the US, and the implications of such evaluations in educational settings.
GE: Cultures & Ideas


English 3271: Structure of the English Language
Instructor:
 Staff
Students learn basic characteristics of English linguistics focusing on the basic building blocks of language; the sounds of English and how they are put together, word formation processes and rules for combining words into utterances/sentences. Students investigate and explore linguistic variation, accents of American English and the implications of language evaluation in educational settings.
GE: Cultures & Ideas


English 3304 (10): Business and Professional Writing
Instructor:
Christiane Buuck
The study of principles and practices of business and professional writing.


English 3304 (40): Business and Professional Writing
Instructor:
Yanar Hashlamon
The study of principles and practices of business and professional writing.


English 3304: Business and Professional Writing
Instructor: 
Staff
The study of principles and practices of business and professional writing.


English 3305: Technical Writing
Instructor:
Staff
Study of principles and practices of technical writing. Emphasis on the style, organization and conventions of technical and research reports, proposals, memoranda, professional correspondence, etc.


English 3364 (10): Special Topics in Popular Culture— Janeites: Austen Fiction, Films and Fans
Instructor:
Robyn Warhol
Janeites: They have outfits. They re-enact Regency balls at annual conventions. They are Jane Austen fanatics. There are at least 62 film and TV adaptations of works by Austen, 28 of them made in the last decade. There’s fan fiction.  There are Jane Austen action figures and “Mrs. Darcy” t-shirts. And now there’s even an online role-play game, “Ever, Jane.” There are children’s versions of Austen novels. Jane Austen cookbooks.  Advice books and board games about “WWJD?” (“What would Jane do?”) And of course, lots of literary criticism. In this class we will be reading some criticism as well as four Austen novels and watching film adaptations including Clueless and the Bollywood-style Bride and Prejudice. We will look at the proliferation of all these contemporary avatars of Jane and more, to ask what it means, especially for women now. Assignments include short informal written responses to questions about the texts, group oral presentations, a midterm and a final.
GE: Cultures & Ideas


English 3364 (40): Special Topics in Popular Culture—Bad Words
Instructor:
Lauren Squires
GE: Cultures & Ideas

This class will explore "bad words" - swearing and other forms of language considered culturally "taboo." What counts as "bad" is not absolute, but is determined by social and cultural norms, situational expectations and individual preferences, habits and personalities. Indeed, some of the language considered offensive in American society even two decades ago is now considered utterly mundane - and vice versa. The goal of this class is to use taboo language as an inherently interesting lens through which to learn about human beings and the language they use. We will approach "bad words" from the viewpoint of multiple disciplines that concern themselves with the study of language, including linguistics, anthropology, psychology, literature, rhetoric and the law.


English 3372 (10): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy
Instructor:
 Kristin Ferebee
What does it mean to be alive? Who gets to be considered alive, and under what conditions? What is the meaning of life? (Just kidding— we all know it’s 42.) The answers to these questions once seemed relatively simple. Now, however, as different sciences, religions, and ways of of life collide in our increasingly globalized world, we find ourselves confronted by complicated and perplexing questions about how we define and value different forms of life. Science fiction— once a genre considered “just for fun” or more “trivial” than real literature— has come to be an important zone where authors and readers grapple with these questions. In this course, we will read and view some of the ways in which science fiction has imagined alternative forms of life. Students will work with examples of film, TV, literature, and comics to explore their preconceptions about boundaries between the “natural” and the “unnatural,” the “human” and the “nonhuman,” the “dead” and the “alive.” Drawing on critical texts from the fields of queer theory, disability theory, and the environmental humanities, we will learn to explore science fiction’s challenges to our set modes of thinking, and understand how these challenges emerge from and relate to the pressing issues of bodily existence and environmental survival that are facing our world today.

This course will fulfill GE requirements by asking students to examine and confront many different perspectives on what constitutes meaningful life, including feminist, queer, disability and non-Western perspectives. The material for the course will appeal to students who are interested in a wide range of science fiction literature and/or pop culture, as well as students who are interested in thinking about and discussing the major ethical issues of our age— particularly students who are studying within the medical or environmental sciences.


English 3372 (30): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy—Climate Fiction
Instructor:
Thomas Davis
Climate Fiction: Climate Change Fiction, or "Cli-Fi," has become a cultural phenomenon in the past few years. The number of cli-fi novels and films has spiked and the New York Times, the Atlantic, ABC News and other outlets have asked how it might help us address the multiple problems of climate change. This course takes up a wide range of cli-fi to examine how writers imagine planetary futures. We will also consider the relationship between cli-fi and climate science. Possible authors: J.G. Ballard, Ursula K. Le Guin, Octavia Butler, Jenni Fagan, Alice Robinson, Nathaniel Rich, Steven Amsterdam, China Mieville and others.
GE: Literature


English 3372 (40): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy—Magic
Instructor:
David Brewer
This course will investigate how magic works in fantasy. Students will consider the place of magic in the creation of fantastical worlds, how readers and viewers are encouraged to buy into those worlds and how the inclusion of magic has contributed to the cultural status of fantasy. Likely readings will include work by Rachel Aaron (The Spirit Thief), Susanna Clarke (Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell), Benedict Jacka (one of the Alex Varus novels), Ursula Le Guin (one of the Earthsea novels), J. K. Rowling (one of the Harry Potter novels), and Brandon Sanderson (one of the Mistborn novels). Students will also examine several films and television shows and consider what difference it makes to see and hear magic. Likely assignments will include a weekly journal, a few short written exercises, an online presentation, a final project in which you sketch out your own magical world and active participation in our discussions.
GE: Literature


English 3378: Special Topics in Film and Literature—Monsters Without and Within
Instructor:
Karen Winstead
Storytellers have long used monsters not only to frighten us but also to jolt us into thinking more deeply about ourselves and our world. No film can be totally faithful to a written source; filmmakers perforce use different methods than do writers to tell their stories, to thrill and provoke. However, this course focuses on films that aggressively transform their literary sources, reinterpreting characters and retooling plots to create monsters that offer different visions of what we have to fear and of how we can (or cannot) overcome the monsters without and within. We will move from dragons and humanoids to vampires, zombies, ghosts, and psychopaths.  Our sampling of classics old and new will include Frankenstein, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Dracula, I Am Legend, and The Shining.  Requirements will include weekly online quizzes, a couple short papers, and a final exam.
GE: Cultures & Ideas


English 3379 (10): Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy
Instructor:
Kay Halasek
As an introduction to the interrelated fields of Writing, Rhetoric, and Literacy, this course familiarizes students with key concepts and research and scholarly methods that underlie work in these interrelated fields, including rhetorical analysis, qualitative studies, and historical and archival research. Together, these fields examine and analyze phenomena, texts, and other artifacts in educational contexts, popular culture, and social and political movements. By the end of this course, students should be able to (1) demonstrate an understanding of and ability to employ the research and scholarly methods applicable in the fields of writing, rhetoric and literacy, (2) research, evaluate, and apply rhetorical principles in analyzing and interpreting phenomena, texts, and other artifacts; (3) demonstrate an understanding of and an ability to apply the central concepts informing writing and literacy studies; and (4) carry out course projects based on the research and scholarly methods in these related fields.


English 3379 (20): Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy
Instructor:
 James Fredal
Introduction to the interrelated fields of Writing, Rhetoric, and Literacy, familiarizing students with key concepts that underlie work in these interrelated fields and to the scholarly methods of WRL. Together, this discipline studies the ways people use language and other symbols to convey messages, persuade audiences, and create meaning, and how these practices are learned and taught.


English 3398 (30): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
Jacob Risinger
This course's purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing.


English 3398: Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor: 
Sarah Neville
This class is designed to support students in developing the skills they need to be successful English majors. Classes and short assignments will cover issues like:

What does secondary criticism add to literature?
How do I read actively? What kinds of tools do I need?
How do I stake a claim? Do I need a flag?
What’s the difference between a long paper and a short one?
How can I distinguish between what they say about a text and what I say?

In addition, over the course of the term students will learn the types, tools, and methods of literary criticism that English scholars employ as they construct projects in both print and digital media. Along the way we’ll read a novel by Robertson Davies, short stories by Dorothy Parker, Lorrie Moore, Donald Barthelme, and George Saunders, a play by Djanet Sears, and poems by Billy-Ray Belcourt. Students will complete in-class exercises and multiple short writing assignments that ultimately build towards a longer research paper.


English 3398 (20): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
Jennifer Higginbotham
This course's purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing.


English 3398: Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
James Fredal
This course's purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing.


English 3398 (60): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
Andrea Williams
This course's purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing.


English 3398 (70): Methods for the Study of Literature: In-Between Texts
Instructor:
Sebastian Knowles
Literature often celebrates the space between worlds, whether an immigrant coming to a new land, a soldier navigating no-man's land, a woman negotiating the barriers of gender and class.  We will read W. G. Sebald's The Emigrants, Virginia Woolf's Orlando, William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying, Manuel Puig's The Kiss of the Spiderwoman, Ian McEwan's Nutshell, and T. S. Eliot's Four Quartets, and see if they have anything in common.


English 3405: Special Topics in Professional Communication—Organizational Writing for the Web
Instructor:
Dan Seward
When people think about writing for the web, social media immediately comes to mind. However, a substantial portion of web-based writing appears on organizational websites. These sites represent a wide range of organizations, from community non-profits to large corporations, from government agencies to local start-ups. And these sites serve many purposes: promoting events, fostering communal interaction, hosting public resources, facilitating services and, most importantly, representing the organizations themselves. In this class, we will examine the online face of modern organizations, first, by writing professional reports analyzing and assessing a range of organizational sites and then, by developing our own organizational sites using free and commonly available site creation tools.

No experience with website development or visual design is necessary—both will be taught as core outcomes of the course, along with the fundamentals of accessibility, interactivity and collaborative composition. Regardless class members’ backgrounds and interests, they will have opportunities to expand their repertoire of professional genres while also refining their abilities to produce engaging and substantive verbal and visual texts. All students will complete the class with multiple contributions for their writing portfolios, including a professional report analyzing an active website, a website redesign proposal and, depending upon students’ own professional (or civic) aims and interests, a variety of web-ready pieces reflecting the communication needs (instructional, promotional, technical, communal, representational, etc.) of organizations falling within students’ desired career paths or civic spheres.


English 3465 (10): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing
Instructor:
Kirsten Edwards

For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing fiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.


English 3465 (20): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing
Instructor:
Elizabeth Coulter Blackford

For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing fiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.


English 3465 (30): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing
Instructor:
Neil Grayson

For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing fiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.


English 3466: Special Topics in Intermediate Poetry Writing
Instructor:
Emmalee Hagarman
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing poetry. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.


English 3467S: Issues and Methods in Tutoring Writing
Instructor:
Genie Giaimo
This course trains students to be effective tutors in the OSU Writing Center or within the Writing Associates Program, which includes learning and applying strategies for working with writers of all levels and writing at all stages of completion and comprehension. Through observation-work, students will learn about the day-to-day activities of a University Writing Center, and how tutors conduct themselves during their sessions with clients. Additionally, we will discuss different strategies that will help tutors as they work with English Language Learners. Students will also be trained in face-to-face and online tutoring methods, as well as individual and group tutoring methods.  Ultimately, this course should help students to feel more confident in their roles as writing consultants, and will shed insight into consulting strategies. This course is discussion-based and aims to engage students' areas of interest and expertise to the formal study of writing, literacy, and writing centers. This course will offer training in research methods and data analysis and will use the Writing Center as a research space, with a hands-on practical learning component that includes observation, supervised tutoring and, ultimately concludes with employment opportunities at the OSU Writing Center or within the Writing Associates Program.


English 3468: Special Topics in Intermediate Creative Nonfiction Writing: Reimagining the Essay
Instructor:
Elizabeth Smith
As writers, we are using memory and imagination to create new worlds from the raw materials of the senses. Together we will explore the act of writing, the act of remembering and how the senses affect memory, the imagination and the texture of language. We will pay particular attention to setting, place, and the exploration of relationships with the physical world: how those relationships are reflected in our own physicality and how they reflect the interiority of characters—motivation, ideas, feelings and thoughts. We will examine connections between outside and inside.

For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing fiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored. Prereq: Grade of C or above in 2265. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs. 


English 3662: An Introduction to Literary Publishing
Instructor:
Kelsey Hagarman
An introduction to the theory and practice of editing and publishing literature.
 

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