Spring 2019: 2000-Level Courses

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English 2202: Selected Works of British Literature—1800 to Present
Instructor:
Jill Galvan and Staff
This course will introduce students to some of the major British texts, authors, and literary forms and trends of the last two centuries. In the process, you will be learning about diverse perspectives on important cultural developments over the past two centuries, including the French Revolution, the abolition of slavery, the Industrial Revolution, imperialism, debates over gender roles and sexuality, the rise of scientific values, the twentieth-century world wars, and the political and cultural consequences of decolonization. We will study major literary modes such as the Romantic lyric, the Gothic novel, the dramatic monologue, World War I poetry, postcolonial narrative, and the Bildungsroman (or “coming-of-age novel”). Our fiction and drama will include Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol, Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest, and Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go. English 2202 will also familiarize students with college-level strategies for analyzing literature. Main course requirements include two exams and two short papers designed to build your skills in literary interpretation.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English 2220: Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructors:
Staff
Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English 2220H: Introduction to Shakespeare—Genre, Gender and Kingship
Instructor:
Luke Wilson
Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English 2260 (10): Introduction to Poetry
Instructor:
 Staff
Designed to help students understand and appreciate poetry through an intensive study of a representative group of poems.
GE: Literature


English 2260 (20): Introduction to Poetry
Instructor:
Sebastian Knowles
Designed to help students understand and appreciate poetry through an intensive study of a representative group of poems.
GE: Literature


English 2260 (30): Introduction to Poetry
Instructor:
Staff
Designed to help students understand and appreciate poetry through an intensive study of a representative group of poems.
GE: Literature


English 2260H: Introduction to Poetry
Instructor:
David Brewer
This course will explore the pleasures and insights of poetry:  reading it, reciting it, listening to it and even writing a bit of it. Toward that end, students will examine a wide range of verse (most, but hardly all of it from the past century) and think about how it works, both on its own terms and on us. Above all, students will be investigating how understanding and enjoyment can reinforce one another, rather than work at cross purposes, at least when it comes to poetry. Likely assignments include a weekly reading journal, several short written exercises, a final project (which could take the form of writing your own verse) and active participation in discussions.
GE: Literature


English 2261 (10): Introduction to Fiction
Instructors:
Sandra MacPherson
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.
GE: Literature


English 2261 (70): Introduction to Fiction
Instructors:
Francis Donoghue
This course will introduce students to the systematic study of fiction. Everyone is familiar with the genre, but we will take the approach that studying it in an organized way at the college level is new to most students. We will examine a mix of short stories and novels, and will ask both formal and historical questions. We will spend the bulk of our time analyzing plots and characters, but always keeping bigger questions in mind: what is each author’s outlook on human behavior and society? How does each author represent that outlook in prose? Because we’re progressing chronologically, beginning with texts written in the nineteenth-century and proceeding to texts written in the twenty-first century, students will, by the end of the course, have developed a clear sense of how fiction has changed over the last century and a half. A final goal of the course will be to help students develop the critical thinking skills necessary to analyze fiction both in conversation and in writing. This is almost entirely a matter of practice, of gradually mastering a vocabulary long used in literary studies for talking and writing about literature. My hope is that this course will enrich your reading experiences long after it’s over.
GE: Literature


English 2261 (40): Introduction to Fiction
Instructors:
Koritha Mitchell
2261: This introduction to fiction course will focus on authors from the United States who have a variety of backgrounds. That is, not every author studied will be white.
GE: Literature


English 2261: Introduction to Fiction
Instructors:
 Staff
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.
GE: Literature


English 2263: Introduction to Film
Instructor:
Frederick Luis Aldama
This course will offer methods and approaches for understanding the devices used (mise-en-scène, lensing, sound, editing, casting and so on) by film directors to give shape to their various distillations and reconstructions of the building blocks of reality. We will also explore the sociopolitical contexts of making and distributing film. And, we will be attuned to how films trigger our perception, thought and feeling systems when consuming films. To this end, we will explore how a film director gives shape through visual and auditory means to a filmic blueprint that triggers real emotions and thoughts about the world—all while we the audience know it to be a distillation and reconstruction of the real world. Films we will likely study include: Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now (1979) Alfonso Cuarón’s Y tu mama también (2001) Alfonso Cuarón’s Children of Men (2006) Cary Joji Fukunaga’s Sin Nombre (2009) González Iñarítu’s Amores Perros (2000) Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing (1989) Terence Malick’s Badlands (1973) Mira Nair's Salaam Bombay! (1988) Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight (2008) Robert Rodriguez’s Sin City (2005) M. Night Shyamalan's Unbreakable (2000) Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction (1994) Guillermo del Toro’s Pan’s Labyrinth (2006) and Barry Jenkins’ Moonlight (2016).
GE: VPA


English 2264: Introduction to Popular Culture Studies
Instructor:
Staff
Introduction to the analysis of popular culture texts.
GE: Cultures & Ideas.
This is a combined section class. Cross-listed in CompStd.


English 2265 (10): Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructors:
Alaina Belisle
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.


English 2265 (30): Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructors: 
Christopher Rinaldo Santantasio
Flash fiction is a work of extreme brevity that hints at a broader narrative. Students will read, discuss and construct a series of very short works of prose employing compression, imagery and carefully chosen details.


English 2265 (40): Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructors: 
Emily Greenberg
In this beginner-level workshop, students will explore the craft of writing fiction by discussing the work of published authors, providing feedback on the work of classmates, and composing and refining their own short stories.

In the first part of the course, students will become familiar with the fundamentals of storytelling by analyzing short stories by masters of literary and popular fiction, including George Saunders, A.M. Homes, Carmen Maria Machado, Stephanie Vaughn, Tobias Wolff, Denis Johnson and many more. Students will examine how authors shape storytelling elements to create desired effects in their readers, and will consider how these strategies may be used in their own writing.

In the second part of the course, students will begin working on their own short pieces, which will be workshopped in class as a group. At the end of the course, students will turn in a revised short story, as well as an artist statement describing their  goals as a writer.

The aim of this workshop is to cultivate a supportive community of writers invested in helping their classmates develop their craft and achieve their aesthetic goals.


English 2265 (20): Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructors: 
Molly Rideout
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.


English 2266: Introductory Poetry Writing
Instructors:
Margaret Brown
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, composition and prosody; practice in the writing of poetry; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published poems by established poets. Prereq: 1110. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.


English 2267: Introduction to Creative Writing
Instructor:
Julie Garbuz
An introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction. Analysis and discussion of student work, with reference to the general methods and scope of all three genres.


English 2268 (10): Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor:
Jacob Scheier-Schwartz
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of creative nonfiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published essays by masters of the many forms of creative nonfiction.


English 2268 (20): Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor:
 Amanda Ingram
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of creative nonfiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published essays by masters of the many forms of creative nonfiction.


English 2269: Digital Media Composing
Instructor:
Staff
A composition course in which students analyze and compose digital media texts while studying complex forms and practices of textual production.
GE: VPA


English 2270: Introduction to Folklore
Instructor:
Staff
Folklore theory and methods explored through engagement with primary sources: folktale, legend, jokes, folksong, festival, belief, art. Folklore Minor course.
GE: Cultures & Ideas
This is a combined section class


English 2276: Arts of Persuasion
Instructor:
Staff
Introduces students to the study and practice of rhetoric and how arguments are shaped by technology, media and cultural contexts.
GE: Cultures & Ideas


English 2277: Introduction to Disability Studies
Instructor:
Sona Hill
This course investigates the ways that disability is composed in contemporary life. We’ll think about disabled people in terms of identity and culture, but we’ll also think about the way disability itself functions to shape our ideas about ourselves, and others. What does it mean when you taste food and say, “That’s crazy good”? What does it mean when you break your ankle and spend a few months using crutches?  Our purpose is not to say, “This way of speaking or behaving is good, and that other way of speaking or behaving is bad.” Rather, our purpose is to ask, over and over again: How does disability make meaning in contemporary life?  We will explore various models of disability, paying attention to the ways that each model intersects with race, gender, class and sexuality. We’ll theorize concepts such as normal, passing, inspiration and access, and consider how these concepts both emerge and are contested through individual authors’ and artists’ composing practices.
GE: Cultures & Ideas


English 2280: The English Bible—The Bible as Literature
Instructor:
Hannibal Hamlin
The Bible contains some of the weirdest and most wonderful literature you will ever read, and there is certainly no book that has had a greater influence on English and American literature from Beowulf to Paradise Lost, Pilgrim’s Progress to The Chronicles of Narnia, Whitman’s Song of Myself to Morrison’s Song of Solomon. We will read a selection of biblical books in order to gain some appreciation of the Bible’s wide range of literary genres, forms, styles and topics. Our discussion will include the nature of biblical narrative and characterization, the function of prophecy and its relation to history, the peculiar nature of biblical poetry, so-called Wisdom literature, anomalous books like Job and The Song of Songs (including the historical process of canonization that made them “biblical” and the kinds of interpretation that have been used to make them less strange), the relationship between (in traditional Christian terms) the Old and New Testaments (including typology, the symbolic linking of characters, events, themes and images in the books before and after the Incarnation) and the unity (or lack thereof) of the Bible as a whole. As occasion warrants, we will also look at some of the diverse ways the Bible has been read and interpreted––the stranger the better––by poets and writers, artists and film-makers over the past millennia.
Do note: this is NOT a course in religion, but rather an English course on the Bible as a literary work. Any and all faiths, or none, are welcome, and none will be privileged. 
Text: The English Bible: King James Version (2 vols.), ed. Herbert Marks (1) and Gerald Hammond and Austin Busch (2), Norton Critical Edition
Course requirements: Evaluation will be based on active participation in class discussion and activities, regular reading quizzes, two short essays, a mid-term test, and a final exam.
GE: Literature


English 2281: Introduction to African-American Literature
Instructor:
Staff
This course introduces students to the major periods and authors of the African American literary tradition from the colonial period to our contemporary moment. In this survey, we will read texts in a wide range of genres (poetry, autobiographies, novels, short stories, nonfiction essays) that engage with an equally broad array of topics and issues, including slavery and freedom, orality and literacy, music and literature, gender and sexuality, political protest and artistic innovation and the persistence of structural racism and racial violence into the present. We will examine literature from the period of chattel slavery in the Americas, through Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, the Harlem Renaissance, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Black Arts Movement, postmodernism and the contemporary.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
This is a combined lecture class. Cross-listed in AfAmASt


English 2282: Introduction to Queer Studies-- Queer & Trans Cultures and Movements
Instructors:
Jian Chen
This seminar explores queer and transgender cultural strategies for movement building from their moments of emergence in the 1960s through their continual re-imagining in response to changing conditions and state and social efforts to target, police and assimilate lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people by the twenty-first century. As a derogatory term turned back against those using it, queer has been claimed as a perversely “negative” descriptive that rejects common-sense heterosexual (and sometimes gender) conventions, while creating different ways of desiring, relating and being in the world. The second half of the course will focus on the embodied struggles and cultural and political strategies of transgender communities. The course will engage with the histories and experiences of communities of color and the analysis of race, racism, colonization and empire as vital to understanding sexuality and gender in the U.S..

GE: Cultures & Ideas
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
This is a combined section class. Cross-listed in WGSS.


English 2290: Colonial and U.S. Literature to 1865
Instructors:
Molly Farrell, Staff

Where does American literature begin? Why do points of origin matter for national literatures? This class explores the shifting canon of early U.S. literature and the colonial literatures from which it emerged. We will read narratives of initial cross-cultural encounters; oral traditions and writings by Native Americans; documents circulated by political leaders; appeals resisting slavery and injustice; sermons, novels, short stories and essays; and some of the most affecting and generative poetry ever written, among other texts. Students will learn to recognize and analyze the distinctive genres of writing that developed across this historical period. In addition, students will gain a sophisticated understanding of the ways that early American studies connects us to powerful contemporary cultural questions. Assignments may consist of required readings, class attendance and participation, quizzes, short analytical papers and exams.


English 2367.01: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience
Instructor: 
Staff

Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)


English 2367.02 (100): Literature in the U.S. Experience
Instructor:
Pranav Jani
Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)


English 2367.02 (110): Literature in the U.S. Experience
Instructor: 
Jessica Prinz
Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)


English 2367.02: Literature in the U.S. Experience
Instructor: 
Staff
Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)


English 2367.03: Documentary in the U.S. Experience
Instructor:
Staff
An intermediate course that extends and refines skills in critical reading and expository writing through analysis of written texts, video and documentaries.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)


English 2367.05 (10): The U.S. Folk Experience
Instructor:
Martha Sims
Concepts of American folklore and ethnography; folk groups, tradition, and fieldwork methodology; how these contribute to the development of critical reading, writing and thinking skills.
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)


English 2367.05: The U.S. Folk Experience
Instructor:
 Staff
Concepts of American folklore and ethnography; folk groups, tradition, and fieldwork methodology; how these contribute to the development of critical reading, writing and thinking skills.
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)


English 2367.06: Composing Disability in the US
Instructor:
Staff

Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America.


English 2367.07S: Literacy Narratives of Black Columbus
Instructor:
Staff

This service-learning course focuses on collecting and preserving literacy narratives of Columbus-area Black communities. Through engagement with community partners, students refine skills in research, analysis and composition; students synthesize information, create arguments about discursive/visual/cultural artifacts and reflect on the literacy and life-history narratives of Black Columbus.


English 2367.08: The US Experience: Writing About Video Games
Instructor: 
Carlos Kelly

In this course, we will play and think critically about video games through the lens of race and gender. We will consider issues of representation in games and also in films about/that include video game aesthetics. No gaming experience necessary!


English 2463: Introduction to Video Games Analysis
Instructor:
Staff
An introduction to humanities-based methods of analyzing and interpreting video games in terms of form, genre, style and theory. No background in video game play is necessary. All students will have regular opportunities for hands-on experience with different game types and genres in both the computer-based classroom and the Department of English Video Game Lab.
GE: VPA

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