Our Courses

Autumn 2017: 5000-Level and Above

1000-level | 2000-level | 3000-level | 4000-level | 5000-level and above

ENGLISH-5191: Internship in English Studies
Instructor: Pablo Tanguay
Students may receive credit for internships across a wide variety of career fields including, but not limited to, the arts and nonprofit administration; creative, business, and technical writing; communications, marketing and public relations; consulting; education; human resources; law and politics; media production; publishing; sales; social services and counseling and technology services. 
 
ENGLISH 5193: Individual Studies
Instructor: Staff
Students may register for individual directed study under this number for work not normally offered in courses. 
 
ENGLISH-5710.01: Introduction to Old English Language and Literature
Instructor: Leslie Lockett
Introduction to Old English language, followed by selected readings in Anglo-Saxon prose and verse texts. 
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-5710.02: Introduction to Old English Language and Literature
Instructor: Leslie Lockett
Introduction to Old English language, followed by selected readings in Anglo-Saxon prose and verse texts. 
This is a combined lecture class
 
ENGLISH-5721.01: Graduate Studies in Renaissance Drama
Instructor: Jennifer Higginbotham
Study of topics, themes, and problems in advanced studies of English drama from the early sixteenth century to 1660. 
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-5721.02: Graduate Studies in Renaissance Drama
Instructor: Jennifer Higginbotham
Study of topics, themes, and problems in advanced studies of English drama from the early sixteenth century to 1660. 
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-5892: Workshop
Instructor: Staff
 
ENGLISH-6662: Literary Publishing
Instructor: Michelle Herman
*This omnibus seminar designed especially for first-year Creative Writing MFA students means to do many different things at once. From the first day, we will examine the very idea of "literature," and in addition to launching you into the three years or writing and workshopping ahead, this seminar's primary purpose is to bridge the gap—to begin the bridge the gap—between your education as writers and the real-world concerns of literary editing and publishing (from both ends of the spectrum—that is, as writers who are being published and as editors discovering, helping to shape and disseminating new work). Since editors don't read in precisely the same way that "civilian" readers or writers do (or for that matter the way writing instructors do), we will work toward an understanding of what it means to read as an editor. We will all become editors, at least for the time being. We'll look at what editors do and how and why they do it; we will ask the questions that most readers don' t—but that editors must—ask themselves. We'll also talk about the slippery terms "popular" and "literary" (and the slipperiest of all: "popular literary"). And even as we figure out who we are—or might be someday if it comes to that—as editors, we will try to make sense of what other editors are looking for, what the literary market is like right now, how it works and where it's headed. This course includes a "laboratory component" of hands-on editorial experience in addition to the assigned reading. You will all serve (in most cases, you will continue to serve after this semester, but this autumn you will receive course credit for your service and will be expected to fulfill your weekly reading responsibilities) on the editorial staff of The Journal, evaluating submissions with an eye to their publication; participating in editorial meetings if you uncover any stories, essays, or poems that are potentially publishable and working together to suggest changes as necessary in a manuscript that needs work. You will also be reading and evaluating book-length works of poetry, helping to screen for a distinguished annual poetry book prize. In other words, the "lab" will give you hands-on experience in both literary magazine and literary book publishing. We will talk about taste and about what we're talking about when we talk about "good."
 
ENGLISH-6700.01: Introduction to Graduate Study in English
Instructor: Amanpal Garcha
Introduction to bibliography, research methods, critical theory, and the principles of literary criticism for advanced work in English studies. Required of all English doctoral candidates. 
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-6700.02: Introduction to Graduate Study in English
Instructor: Amanpal Garcha
Introduction to bibliography, research methods, critical theory, and the principles of literary criticism for advanced work in English studies. Required of all English doctoral candidates. 
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-6761.01: Introduction to Graduate Study in Narrative and Narrative Theory
Instructor: Amy Shuman
Study of narrative in its different manifestations, e.g., novel, autobiography, film, legal testimony, and of theories of its form and significance. 
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-6761.02: Introduction to Graduate Study in Narrative and Narrative Theory
Instructor: Amy Shuman
Study of narrative in its different manifestations, e.g., novel, autobiography, film, legal testimony, and of theories of its form and significance. 
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-6763.01: Graduate Workshop in Poetry
Instructor: Kathy Grandinetti
A graduate-level workshop in the writing of poetry. 
 
ENGLISH-6755.01: Graduate Workshop in Fiction
Instructor: Lee Martin
*This is a graduate-level creative writing workshop primarily for students enrolled in our MFA program. The work will consist of discussion and analysis of pieces of fiction presented by the members of the workshop. Each member will write two pieces of fiction. The other students will prepare marked manuscripts and write summary letters for their peers. We may have outside readings of craft articles and stories. At the end of the semester, each student will present a portfolio that will consist of drafts of the two pieces of fiction with one of them significantly revised.
 
ENGLISH-6768: Graduate Workshop in Creative Nonfiction
Instructor: Staff
A graduate-level workshop in the writing of creative nonfiction. 
 
ENGLISH-6769: Graduate Workshop in Creative Writing (Special Topics)
Instructor: Angus Fletcher
A special topics course in the writing of fiction, poetry, and/or creative nonfiction. 
 
ENGLISH-6778.01: Introduction to Graduate Study in Film and Film Theory
Instructor: Jesse Schotter
An advanced survey of the methodologies, contexts, and development of film and film theory. 
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-6778.02: Introduction to Graduate Study in Film and Film Theory
Instructor: Jess Schotter
An advanced survey of the methodologies, contexts, and development of film and film theory. 
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-6781: Introduction to the Teaching of First-Year English
Instructor: Edgar Singleton
Introduction to the theory and practice of teaching first-year English. Required of new GTA’s in English.
 
ENGLISH-6795.01: Introduction to Research Methods in Rhetoric and Composition
Instructor: Jonathan Buehl
*Are you stumped when someone asks, “What is your research methodology?” This course prepares graduate students to design and execute research projects in rhetoric, composition and literacy studies. This course provides introductions to methods for analyzing texts and contexts, studying writing instruction and researching literacy practices. It also introduces students to methodological issues related to research in these fields. We will discuss and practice specific research activities: locating and using archival material; quantifying style; identifying, collecting and analyzing qualitative data; supporting textual analysis with historical and empirical evidence and working with human subjects, etc. We will discuss and practice methodological processes: how to select methods based on the kinds of intellectual problems you want to approach, how to develop methods for specific projects and how to present methods when framing arguments, etc. You will practice specific methods in several short assignments. These projects will include a historical research project related to material in the OSU Archives, a qualitative inquiry project and a rhetorical analysis project. You will then write the methodological rationale for a significant project related to one of your research interests. This project could be related to a dissertation project, but you do not need to be starting the dissertation phase of your studies to execute this assignment successfully.
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-6795.02: Introduction to Research Methods in Rhetoric and Composition
Instructor: Jonathan Buehl
*Are you stumped when someone asks, “What is your research methodology?” This course prepares graduate students to design and execute research projects in rhetoric, composition and literacy studies. This course provides introductions to methods for analyzing texts and contexts, studying writing instruction and researching literacy practices. It also introduces students to methodological issues related to research in these fields. We will discuss and practice specific research activities: locating and using archival material; quantifying style; identifying, collecting and analyzing qualitative data; supporting textual analysis with historical and empirical evidence and working with human subjects, etc. We will discuss and practice methodological processes: how to select methods based on the kinds of intellectual problems you want to approach, how to develop methods for specific projects and how to present methods when framing arguments, etc. You will practice specific methods in several short assignments. These projects will include a historical research project related to material in the OSU Archives, a qualitative inquiry project and a rhetorical analysis project. You will then write the methodological rationale for a significant project related to one of your research interests. This project could be related to a dissertation project, but you do not need to be starting the dissertation phase of your studies to execute this assignment successfully.
This is a combined lecture class
 
ENGLISH-6998: Graduate Research in English
Instructor: Staff
 
ENGLISH-7350.03: Theorizing Folklore III: Differentiation, Identification and the Folk
Instructor: Amy Shuman
Cultural form as a social tool for both differentiation and integration. "Folklore" and other metacultural concepts in the history of modernity. Folklore GIS course. 
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-7350.33: Theorizing Folklore III: Differentiation, Identification and the Folk
Instructor: Amy Shuman
Cultural form as a social tool for both differentiation and integration. "Folklore" and other metacultural concepts in the history of modernity. Folklore GIS course. 
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-7818.01: Seminar in Later Medieval Literature
Instructor: Karen Winstead
Topics include: Poetry of the alliterative revival; medieval English drama; fifteenth-century non-dramatic literature. 
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-7818.02: Seminar in Later Medieval Literature
Instructor: Karen Winstead
Topics include: Poetry of the alliterative revival; medieval English drama; fifteenth-century non-dramatic literature. 
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-7838.01: Seminar in Critical Issues in the Restoration and Eighteenth-Century
Instructor: Roxann Wheeler
An intensive consideration of a selected critical problem or a selected intellectual focus in the scholarly study of Restoration and/or eighteenth-century literature and culture.
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-7838.02: Seminar in Critical Issues in the Restoration and Eighteenth-Century
Instructor: Roxann Wheeler
An intensive consideration of a selected critical problem or a selected intellectual focus in the scholarly study of Restoration and/or eighteenth-century literature and culture.
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-7840.01: Seminar in English Romantic Literature: Romanticism & Critique
Instructor: Jacob Risinger
*Romantic writers are all too often typecast as the idealistic but decisively uncritical inheritors of the Enlightenment. In this common narrative, Romanticism signals a shift away from reason, social reform, and attempts to formulate a new science of man. Its ethereal practitioners (so the story goes) turn away from society and fetishize the self: they abscond to nature, indulge in feeling and use the imagination to gloss over the inadequacies of the real world.  In this sense, it’s hardly surprising that Romantics are often dismissed as "hopeless." In this seminar, we'll take a radically different tack: in our readings and discussion, we will consider the various ways in which Romanticism represents a continuation—or perhaps even an intensification—of an Enlightenment mode of critique.  After all, Immanuel Kant once described his own age as "in every sense of the word the age of criticism." Thirty years later, radical essayist William Hazlitt described the critical temperament as similarly ubiquitous: "We are become a nation of authors and readers" We all follow the same profession, which is criticism, each individual is every thing but himself, not one but all mankind's epitome." Confronted with their own implication in the sheer profusion of criticism, Romantic writers grappled with questions that we're still asking today: can literature really serve as an effective vehicle for critique? What are the limits of critique, and what are its as-yet unrealized possibilities? Does a critical perspective on life preclude an authentic experience of it? What does it mean to be (in Mark Greif's terms) "against everything, even those things in which one is complicit"? Finally, why should anyone—be it Romantic poet or twenty-first-century graduate student—bother with criticism in a recalcitrant world?  Readings will emphasize the Romantic critique of three ridiculously broad topics: man, nature and society. We will (most likely) explore poetry and prose from Rousseau, Kant, Anna Barbauld, William Godwin, Blake, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Hazlitt, Thomas De Quincey, Byron, Percy Shelley, Keats and Mary Shelley. We'll also devote some time to thinking through the long history and recent reassessment of critique in literary theory.
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-7840.02: Seminar in English Romantic Literature
Instructor: Jacob Risinger
*Romantic writers are all too often typecast as the idealistic but decisively uncritical inheritors of the Enlightenment. In this common narrative, Romanticism signals a shift away from reason, social reform, and attempts to formulate a new science of man. Its ethereal practitioners (so the story goes) turn away from society and fetishize the self: they abscond to nature, indulge in feeling and use the imagination to gloss over the inadequacies of the real world.  In this sense, it’s hardly surprising that Romantics are often dismissed as "hopeless." In this seminar, we'll take a radically different tack: in our readings and discussion, we will consider the various ways in which Romanticism represents a continuation—or perhaps even an intensification—of an Enlightenment mode of critique.  After all, Immanuel Kant once described his own age as "in every sense of the word the age of criticism." Thirty years later, radical essayist William Hazlitt described the critical temperament as similarly ubiquitous: "We are become a nation of authors and readers" We all follow the same profession, which is criticism, each individual is every thing but himself, not one but all mankind's epitome." Confronted with their own implication in the sheer profusion of criticism, Romantic writers grappled with questions that we're still asking today: can literature really serve as an effective vehicle for critique? What are the limits of critique, and what are its as-yet unrealized possibilities? Does a critical perspective on life preclude an authentic experience of it? What does it mean to be (in Mark Greif's terms) "against everything, even those things in which one is complicit"? Finally, why should anyone—be it Romantic poet or twenty-first-century graduate student—bother with criticism in a recalcitrant world?  Readings will emphasize the Romantic critique of three ridiculously broad topics: man, nature and society. We will (most likely) explore poetry and prose from Rousseau, Kant, Anna Barbauld, William Godwin, Blake, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Hazlitt, Thomas De Quincey, Byron, Percy Shelley, Keats and Mary Shelley. We'll also devote some time to thinking through the long history and recent reassessment of critique in literary theory.
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-7851.01: Seminar in Critical Approaches to Black Literatures
Instructor: Koritha Mitchell
A close reading of major literary critical discourses that have shaped and determined the course of black literary production in Africa, North America, and the Caribbean.
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-7851.02: Seminar in Critical Approaches to Black Literatures
Instructor: Koritha Mitchell
A close reading of major literary critical discourses that have shaped and determined the course of black literary production in Africa, North America, and the Caribbean.
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-7858.01: Seminar in U.S. Ethnic Literatures and Culture
Instructor: Pranav Jani
Advanced work in U.S. ethnic literatures and cultures through study of a specific issue, theme, or problem of central concern to the field. Topic varies. 
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-7858.02: Seminar in U.S. Ethnic Literatures and Culture
Instructor: Pranav Jani
Advanced work in U.S. ethnic literatures and cultures through study of a specific issue, theme, or problem of central concern to the field. Topic varies. 
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-7871.01: Seminar in the Forms of Literature
Instructor: Marcus Jackson
A graduate seminar in the forms of poetry, fiction and/or creative nonfiction. 
 
ENGLISH-7879.01: Seminar in Rhetoric
Instructor: Nancy Johnson
Rhetoric of a particular period; major figures in rhetoric, rhetorical analysis of literature. 
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-7879.02: Seminar in Rhetoric
Instructor: Nancy Johnson
Rhetoric of a particular period; major figures in rhetoric, rhetorical analysis of literature. 
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-7883.01: Seminar in Literacy Studies
Instructor: Beverly Moss
Study of a special topic in literacy studies; topics vary, but may include race, popular culture, gender, technology, or globalization. 
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-7883.02: Seminar in Literacy Studies
Instructor: Beverly Moss
Study of a special topic in literacy studies; topics vary, but may include race, popular culture, gender, technology, or globalization. 
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-8193: Individual Studies
Instructor: Staff
Doctoral students may register for individual study in areas not normally covered by courses. 
 
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