Our Courses

Autumn 2017: 2000-Level

1000-level | 2000-level | 3000-level 4000-level | 5000-level and above

ENGLISH-2201: Selected Works of British Literature—Medieval Through 1800
Instructors: Hannibal Hamlin and Staff
An introductory critical study of the works of major British writers from 800 to 1800. 
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)
 
ENGLISH-2201H: Selected Works of British Literature—Medieval Through 1800
Instructor: Leslie Lockett
An introductory critical study of the words of major British writers from 800 to 1800. 
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)
 
ENGLISH-2202: Selected Works of British Literature—1800 to Present
Instructor: Staff
An introductory critical study of the works of major British writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)
 
ENGLISH-2202: Selected Works of British Literature—1800 to Present
Instructor: Clare Simmons 
*This course is designed to introduce students to the major periods in British literature from 1800 to the present, namely, the Romantic, Victorian, Modern and Postmodern periods, through the study of representative works and central ideas. The course provides a historical foundation for advanced-level study of British literature. A loose theme for this course will be the tension between a rationalist understanding of the material world and the world of imagination and feeling—or as Jane Austen expressed it, Sense and Sensibility, the title of the first novel that we will read. Other readings will include influential poetry by Wordsworth, Coleridge, Tennyson, Browning, the Rossettis, Hardy, Eliot, Thomas and others; and samplings of fiction by such authors as Dickens, Woolf, Conrad and Rushdie. By the end of the course, you should be able to read and analyze poetry and prose and place them in their historical context; you should also be able to write a brief critical analysis of a literary work. Finally, you should be able to compare and contrast aspects of British culture of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with those of the present day.  
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)
 
ENGLISH-2202H: Selected Works of British Literature—1800 to Present
Instructor: David Riede
*This course is designed as an introduction to the great literary figures and movements from the time of the French Revolution to our own times. We will be especially interested in distinguishing the Romantic, Victorian, modernist and postcolonial periods and movements. Classes will consist of lecture and discussion, but mostly discussion, I hope. 
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)
 
ENGLISH-2220: Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructors: Antony Shuttleworth, Hannibal Hamlin and Staff
Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience. 
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)
 
ENGLISH-2220H: Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructor: Christopher Highley
Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience. 
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)
 
ENGLISH-2260: Introduction to Poetry
Instructor: David Riede 
*This course is intended as an introduction to major poems and poets in the English language and will examine poems in historical, literary-historical and broader cultural contexts. We will be concerned especially with poetic form and craft and the many and various uses of such forms as sonnets, ballads, odes, blank and rhymed verse and so on, and we will also focus on the crafting of voice, tone, imagery, sound and rhythm. 
GE: Literature
 
ENGLISH-2260: Introduction to Poetry
Instructor: Matthew Cariello
Designed to help students understand and appreciate poetry through an intensive study of a representative group of poems. 
GE: Literature
 
ENGLISH-2261: Introduction to Fiction
Instructors: Mark Conroy, Roxann Wheeler, Sandra MacPherson, David Brewer, Jill Galvan and Matthew Cariello
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included. 
GE: Literature
 
ENGLISH-2261: Introduction to Fiction
Instructors: Elizabeth Renker
*This class will introduce students to fiction as an art form. The instructor will train you in a core group of analytical methods that will enable you to understand how fiction works. We will read an array of short stories and short novels by various authors who have experimented with fiction over the past two centuries, including Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Flannery O'Connor, Charles Chesnutt, John Barth and more.  You will finish this class with improved skills for understanding fiction and stronger analytical abilities. 
GE: Literature
 
ENGLISH-2261: Introduction to Fiction
Instructor: Jill Galvan
*This course has two goals. The first is to familiarize (or re-familiarize) you with some of the basic literary concepts (character, point of view, tone, symbolism, etc.) associated with the genre of fiction. The second is to help you feel comfortable approaching fiction critically. You will learn college-level strategies for analyzing literature, including reading a text with an eye for fine detail (a.k.a. close-reading) and how to construct logical interpretations based on textual evidence. The instructor will likely provide some lecture in each meeting, but much of the class will be conducted as a general discussion. Our readings will span literary history, as well as diverse cultural and social perspectives. They will loosely circulate around the theme of humanity/what it means to be human. Texts are still very tentative but might include Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Octavia Butler's Kindred, Justin Torres's We the Animals and Karen Joy Fowler's We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves. 
GE: Literature
 
ENGLISH-2261H: Introduction to Fiction
Instructor: Zoe Thompson
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations; comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included. 
GE: Literature
 
ENGLISH-2263: Introduction to Film
Instructor: Staff
Introduction to methods of reading film texts by analyzing cinema as technique, as system and as cultural product. 
GE: VPA
 
ENGLISH-2263: Introduction to Film
Instructor: Ryan Friedman 
*This course familiarizes students with the basic building blocks of film, the forms that movies use to tell stories, move viewers emotionally, communicate complex ideas, and dramatize social conflicts. It also introduces students to significant developments in film history and ways of approaching film interpretation. Our primary goal is to become skilled at thinking, talking and writing critically about movies and, in the process, to deepen our appreciation and understanding of the film medium.
GE: VPA
 
ENGLISH-2264: Introduction to Popular Culture Studies
Instructor: Frank DiPiero and Staff
Introduction to the analysis of popular culture texts. 
GE: Cultures & Ideas
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-2265: Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructors: Mallory Laurel, David Bukszpan, Tyler Sones and Meghan Callahan
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.
 
ENGLISH-2266: Introductory Poetry Writing
Instructors: Allison Talbot and Jessica Lieberman
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, composition, and prosody; practice in the writing of poetry; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published poems by established poets.
 
ENGLISH-2267: Introduction to Creative Writing
Instructor: Zoe Thompson
An introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction. Analysis and discussion of student work, with reference to the general methods and scope of all three genres. 
 
ENGLISH-2268: Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor: Elizabeth Rose-Cohen
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, and composition; practice in the writing of creative nonfiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published essays by masters of the many forms of creative nonfiction.
 
ENGLISH-2269: Digital Media Composing
Instructor: Staff
A composition course in which students analyze and compose digital media texts while studying complex forms and practices of textual production. 
GE: VPA
 
ENGLISH-2270: Introduction to Folklore
Instructor: Katherine Borland
Folklore theory and methods explored through engagement with primary sources: folktale, legend, jokes, folksong, festival, belief, art. Folklore Minor course.
GE: Cultures & Ideas
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-2275: Thematic Approaches to Literature—Oil and Water in Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Native American Literatures
Instructor: Joshua Anderson
GE: Literature
*Rather than upholding the cliché that “oil and water don’t mix,” this course explores how oil and water have long been intertwined in Indian Country. With works by Native authors Winona LaDuke and Thomas King we will explore the art, activism and literature related to the recent #NoDAPL Standing Rock and Keystone XL pipeline protests, and discuss the contemporary hip-hop of Lakota rapper Frank Waln, the punk-influenced music of AlterNative bands and the artwork of Native artist Bunky Echo Hawk. With Linda Hogan’s novel Mean Spirit and materials from online FBI case files, we will trace the history of oil and water back to the 1920s Oklahoma oil boom that made the Osage Tribe the “wealthiest nation on earth” and resulted in the “Reign of Terror,” in which more than 60 Osage were murdered, most of which remain unsolved. Finally, in our unit “Representation and Resistance,” we will read works by Eric Gansworth, Sherman Alexie, and Louise Erdrich that will help us recognize the interconnections between (mis)representations of Native peoples in politics and and pop-culture and resistance to economic and environmental racism. With an emphasis on interdisciplinary learning, this GE: Literature course invites participation from a broad range of students with interests in literature and environmental studies, law, politics, and pop-culture, engineering, economics, health care, and resource management.
 
ENGLISH-2276: Arts of Persuasion
Instructor: James Fredal
*This course will be an introduction to the arts of persuasion as taught and practiced through the discipline of rhetoric and sophistic since the fifth century B.C. We will first review the elements of a rhetorical encounter, including the speaker or producer, the viewer or audience, the topic and text, the cultural context and situation, etc. Then we'll examine a series of different genres of persuasive texts, both verbal, visual, and auditory, to better understand the uses, goals, resources and limitations available to all parties to a rhetorical encounter to make themselves heard, understood and accepted.
GE: Cultures & Ideas
ENGLISH-2277: Introduction to Disability Studies
Instructor: Sean Kamperman
*This course investigates the ways that disability is constructed in contemporary life and how it shapes our ideas of ourselves and others. Together, we’ll discuss concepts like normal, passing, inspiration and access, and consider how these concepts emerge and are contested through individual authors’ and artists’ composing practices.
GE: Cultures & Ideas
 
ENGLISH-2280: The English Bible
Instructor: James Fredal
*You’ve heard about it, seen movies about it, wondered what's really in it, maybe you’ve even tried to read it: the Bible continues to be one of, if not the, best-selling book of all time and a book of tremendous importance not only for the religious lives of individuals and communities, but for Western and indeed, world history. Perhaps no book has had as great an impact on as many people and nations across the centuries as the Judeo-Christian Bible. It has long been revered as the authoritative source of moral and spiritual teaching and individual and world salvation. It has also, more recently been reviled for its role in supporting slavery, misogyny, homophobia, racism, colonialism and genocide. Unfortunately, it can also be notoriously difficult to follow, interpret or even understand the Bible's strange language. Compelling stories are often followed by long lists of boring “begats” Strange tales involving improbable characters with unpronounceable names are followed by long-winded speeches or a string of “shalt-nots” that often seem simplistic, impossible to apply or completely irrelevant to contemporary life. Impossibilities and contradictions abound. Who can make sense of it? Our goal in this class is not to produce the final answer on the Bible or its meaning, but simply to get used to its language and to work through some of its most important genres, themes and characters. Our goal is to get a handle on the Biblical story in all its parts and sections, as it has been built up over centuries by dozens or hundreds of mostly anonymous authors. Our goal will also be to get a sense, beyond its many parts and contradictions, of the larger unity of thought and aspiration conveyed through the Bible. We will attempt to get a handle on its message and its purpose.
GE: Literature
 
ENGLISH-2281: Introduction to African-American Literature
Instructor: Koritha Mitchell
*How does music (including hip hop, jazz and the blues) relate to the Nobel prize-winning literature of someone like Toni Morrison? Does the slang some African Americans speak have any relationship to the work of black scholars who write academic books while teaching at universities? This course will answer these and similar questions while exposing students to the African American literary tradition, from 1760 to the present. It will also empower students to answer such questions long after the class is over, by equipping them with intellectual concepts: call and response, masking and signifyin(g). This course will not only introduce students to major figures in African American literature; it will also place these figures in the context of African American history and culture. We will work from the premise that this literary tradition has never existed solely to respond to so-called "dominant" culture and "mainstream" literature. In addition to well-known writers, such as Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston, this course will explore the work of equally important but less widely known authors, such as Harriet Jacobs, Ida B. Wells, Charles Chesnutt and Audre Lorde. 
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
This is a combined lecture class
 
ENGLISH-2282: Introduction to Queer Studies—Queer & Trans Micro-Politics of the Everyday
Instructors: Joy Ellison and Jian Chen
*This seminar explores queer and trans politics from the emergence of counter-cultural protest, critique and community building in the late 1960s to the networked and embedded practices, relationships and identities of the first decades of the twenty-first century. 
GE: Cultures & Ideas
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
This is a combined section class
 
ENGLISH-2290: Colonial and U.S. Literature to 1865
Instructors: Jared Gardner and Staff
Introductory study of significant works of U.S. literature from its colonial origins to 1865. 
GE: Literature
 
ENGLISH-2367.01: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience
Instructors: James Griffith, Scott DeWitt and Staff
Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America. 
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
 
ENGLISH-2367.01H: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience
Instructor: Staff
Extends and refines expository writing & analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America. 
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
 
ENGLISH-2367.01H: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience
Instructor: Staff
Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
 
ENGLISH-2367.01S: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience—Literacy Narratives of Black Columbus Visual Artists 
Instructor: Sherita Roundtree
*This course will focus on the literacy narratives of Black visual artists in Columbus. We will learn from these artists’ literate lives and explore literacy’s relationship to their art. As a writer in this course, you will engage your perceptions of literacy through community-based research, expository writing and oral presentation.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
 
ENGLISH-2367.02: Literature in the U.S. Experience
Instructor: Staff
Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
 
ENGLISH-2367.02H: Literature in the U.S. Experience
Instructors: Pranav Jani and Jennifer Patton
Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience. 
GE: Literature
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
 
ENGLISH 2367.03: Documentary in the U.S. Experience
Instructor: Staff
An intermediate course that extends and refines skills in critical reading and expository writing through analysis of written texts, video and documentaries. 
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
 
ENGLISH-2367.05: The U.S. Folk Experience
Instructor: Staff
Concepts of American folklore and ethnography; folk groups, tradition, and fieldwork methodology; how these contribute to the development of critical reading, writing and thinking skills. 
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
 
ENGLISH-2463: Introduction to Video Games Analysis
Instructor: Staff
An introduction to humanities-based methods of analyzing and interpreting video games in terms of form, genre, style and theory. No background in video game play is necessary. All students will have regular opportunities for hands-on experience with different game types and genres in both the computer-based classroom and the Department of English Video Game Lab.
GE: VPA
 

 

0