Spring 2020: 3000-Level Courses

 
English 3271 (10 and 30): Structure of the English Language 
Instructor: Clarissa Surek-Clark 
Students learn basic characteristics of English linguistics focusing on the basic building blocks of language; the sounds of English and how they are put together, word formation processes and rules for combining words into utterances/sentences. Students investigate and explore linguistic variation, accents of American English and the implications of language evolution in educational settings.  
GE: Cultures & Ideas 

English 3271 (20): Structure of the English Language 
Instructor: Lauren Squires 
Students learn basic characteristics of English linguistics focusing on the basic building blocks of language; the sounds of English and how they are put together, word formation processes and rules for combining words into utterances/sentences. Students investigate and explore linguistic variation, accents of American English and the implications of language evaluation in educational settings. 
GE: Cultures & Ideas 

English 3304: Business and Professional Writing 
Instructor: Christiane Buuck 
The study of principles and practices of business and professional writing. 

English 3305 (10): Technical Writing 
Instructor: Jason Collins 
Study of principles and practices of technical writing. Emphasis on the style, organization and conventions of technical and research reports, proposals, memoranda, professional correspondence, etc. 

English 3305 (20): Technical Writing 
Instructor: Staff 
Study of principles and practices of technical writing. Emphasis on the style, organization and conventions of technical and research reports, proposals, memoranda, professional correspondence, etc. 

English 3361: Narrative and Medicine 
Instructor: Antonio Ferraro 
Illness generates stories. Whether from patients, caregivers or loved one, stories of illness are everywhere, informing our sense of what it means to suffer, to adjust to altered and disabled bodies and to seek comfort and relief. In this class we'll explore, through close examinations of novels, essays, films, poems and other media, the many ways illness narratives intervene in our shared and individual conceptions of illness. Further, by drawing on our different personal and academic experiences, we'll explore how improving our narrative competencies, or the different ways we respond to and create narratives, can inform our medical competencies, or the ways we give and receive health care. 
GE: Literature 

English 3364 (10): Special Topics in Popular Culture—Vampires 
Instructor: Karen Winstead 
This course will examine the representation of vampires in popular culture, from their folkloric roots and their classic literary representations in the nineteenth-century- John Polidori's Vampyre, Sheridan Le Fanu's Carmilla and Bram Stoker's Dracula - to their recent incarnations in TV, film and in such novels as Let the Right One In and NOS4A2.  We will consider what made blood-suckers so mesmerizing and how their image has shifted over the centuries.  We will also consider how these figures have been used to explore a host of social issues, generational and class conflict, changing gender roles, sexual identity - as well as to articulate "forbidden" passions and fears.  Requirements will include a series of Carmen quizzes, three short essays and a final exam. 
GE: Cultures & Ideas 

English 3372 (20): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy 
Instructor: Staff 
Introduction to the tradition and practice of speculative writing. Provides students the opportunity to examine and compare works of science fiction and/or fantasy. 
GE: Literature  

English 3372 (30): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy—Tolkien's Monsters 
Instructor: Merrill Kaplan 
Tolkien`s bestiary of wights, wargs, balrogs and nazguls is half the fun of his books. Add the races of elves, dwarves, hobbits, orcs and men and there is a lot to talk about. What is a monster and what do monsters mean? What are the relationships between Tolkien`s monsters and the elves, dragons and trolls of folklore and medieval epic? How have Tolkien`s ideas about race affected subsequent fantasy literature and games? In looking at monsters, we`ll examine the boundaries of the human and explore the violent language of dehumanization. We`ll hew to the books, not the movies and readings will include the Hobbit, the Lord of the Rings trilogy, Tolkien`s essay "The Monsters and the Critics," modern theoretical works on monstrosity and about race, and comparative texts from folklore and medieval literature. 
GE: Literature 

English 3372 (40): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy—How Magic Works 
Instructor: David Brewer 
The most fundamental distinguishing mark of fantasy is that it features stories in which magic works. The magic may be front and center (Harry Potter) or kept largely in the background (Game of Thrones); it may be largely an instrument of evil or a morally neutral tool. But regardless of the form it takes, in the vast majority of fantasy, magic is real, which means that to the extent that we buy into these stories and the worlds in which they're set, we are temporarily accepting the existence of magic (or at least suspending our disbelief in its existence). This course will investigate how that process works, and what it might be able to tell us about literature more generally. We'll also consider how the open embrace of magic has contributed to the (traditionally low, but recently rising) cultural status of fantasy. Course requirements include a weekly reading and viewing journal, a recommendation to your colleagues of a work of fantasy beyond what we will be reading together, a short essay, active participation in our discussions and a contribution to a collectively devised new magic system. 
GE: Literature 

English 3378: Special Topics in Film and Literature—Shakespeare & Film 
Instructor: Alan Farmer 
In this course, we will study some of the most innovative and influential films ever made of Shakespeare's plays.  We will both read specific plays (probably Richard III, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Much Ado About Nothing, Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Titus Andronicus and Macbeth) and view films that cut across dramatic genres, time periods, countries and cinematic styles, by such directors as Max Reinhardt (Austria and Germany), Laurence Olivier (England), Akira Kurosawa (Japan), Baz Luhrmann (Australia), Michael Almereyda (U.S.), Al Pacino (U.S.) and Julie Taymor (U.S.). We will focus on how directors and actors have chosen to adapt Shakespeare for performance, but also consider how these films have shaped, and continue to shape, the cultural meaning of "Shakespeare: for modern audiences.  Requirements will include two essays, several quizzes, a midterm, a final exam, regular attendance and active participation. 
GE: Cultures & Ideas 

English 3379 (10): Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy 
Instructor: James Fredal 
Introduction to the interrelated fields of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy, familiarizing students with key concepts that underlie work in these interrelated fields and to the scholarly methods of WRL. Together, this discipline studies the ways people use language and other symbols to convey messages, persuade audiences, and create meaning and how these practices are learned and taught.  

English 3379 (20): Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy 
Instructor: Christa Teston 
Introduction to the interrelated fields of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy, familiarizing students with key concepts that underlie work in these interrelated fields and to the scholarly methods of WRL. Together, this discipline studies the ways people use language and other symbols to convey messages, persuade audiences, and create meaning and how these practices are learned and taught.  

English 3398 (20): Methods for the Study of Literature 
Instructor: Susan Williams 
Serves as the "Methods" course for the Literature and Creative Writing concentrations within the English major. Its purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing. Required of English majors. Open to English majors only or others by department permission. 

English 3398 (30): Methods for the Study of LiteratureThe Text, The Critic, & the World
Instructor: Thomas Davis 
This course offers a foundation for those seeking to develop the skills and practices to succeed in the English major. We will think carefully about how our understanding and analysis of texts relates to the world as well as the practical ends of the kinds of work we do; to that end, we will experiment with different methods and different forms of writing (close reading exercises, listicles, public-facing criticism, expository essays and reseached essays). Students will engage with a wide range of genres, forms, and media, including poetry, climate fiction, visual media and possibly zines and a video game. We will also consider the value—economic, intellectual, cultural—of undertaking humanistic work in our contemporary moment of devalued labor, climate breakdown and “post-truth” politics.   

English 3398 (60): Methods for the Study of Literature 
Instructor: Sarah Neville 
This class is designed to support students in developing the writing and research skills they need to be successful English majors. Classes and short assignments will cover issues like:
  • What does secondary criticism add to literature?
  • How do I read actively? What kinds of tools do I need?
  • How do I stake a claim? Do I need a flag?
  • What’s the difference between a long paper and a short one?
  • How can I distinguish between what they say about a text and what I say?
In addition, over the course of the term students will learn the types, tools, and methods of literary criticism that English scholars employ as they construct projects in both print and digital media. Along the way we’ll read a novel by Robertson Davies, short stories by Dorothy Parker, Lorrie Moore, Donald Barthelme, and George Saunders, plays by Djanet Sears and William Shakespeare, and poems by Billy-Ray Belcourt. Students will complete in-class exercises and multiple short writing assignments that ultimately build towards a longer research paper.

English 3398 (70): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor: Ryan Friedman 
This course will focus on developing writing skills essential to academic English studies.  We will explore what it means to read critically or to interpret literary texts from different genres (poetry, narrative fiction and drama) as well as narrative films. Through class discussions, workshop activities and short written assignments, we will practice raising significant questions of interpretation about texts and developing arguments in response to these questions. We will also explore different approaches to interpreting the texts on our syllabus. To emphasize the process of writing, our course will be structured around a series of essay assignments, which allow you to practice the range of techniques necessary to produce high-quality essays about literature: outlining, doing close analysis, using textual evidence, thesis writing, using argumentative rhetoric effectively, organizing paragraphs, responding to other critics and revising.

English 3398 (80): Methods for the Study of Literature 
Instructor: Koritha Mitchell 
This class will introduce students to a variety of "methods" for literary studies. It builds on the critical thinking and writing skills that students already possess by offering opportunities to put forth clear, thesis-driven arguments. We will cover several theoretical approaches to literature. In many cases, we will examine Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby through different lenses in order to get a feel for how these approaches illuminate the richness of a single text. To further test the theories introduced, we will read other literary forms, including drama and poetry.
 
Required reading will include:
F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby
Lois Tyson, Critical Theory Today, 3rd edition
(all other texts available electronically)
 
Requirements will likely include: thoughtful class participation, three essays, a library assignment, and a thesis-driven oral presentation. So, students enrolling in this section of 3398 should welcome the opportunity to practice their public speaking skills.

English 3465 (10): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing—Writing Against Convention
Instructor: Scott Broker 
In this intermediate fiction course, we will focus on reading and writing work that challenges traditional modes of narrative realism. From genre blending to structural innovation, unconventional subject matter to non-standard logic, we will pursue and embrace that which is often seen as strange, taboo, uncanny, or queer, trying to understand how these stories work in relation to the normative conventions of fiction. We will begin by analyzing a wide range of texts to situate ourselves within the history of unconventional writing. From these stories, we will pull tricks and tools that will help in the development of our own unique voices. The reading list is diverse and challenging, and I ask and expect you to read with an open mind. Some possible authors include: Diane Cook, Mariana Enriquez, Samanta Schweblin, Deb Olin Unferth, Miranda July, Ben Marcus, Jamaica Kincaid, Lesley Nneka Arimah, Carmen Maria Machado, Kelly Link, Karen Russell, Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah, Joy Williams, Ottessa Moshfegh, Helen Oyeyemi, Catherine Lacey, Yukiko Motoya, Rita Bullwinkel and Aimee Bender.

English 3465 (30): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing—Flash and Other Short Forms of Fiction
Instructor: Meagan McAlister 
This intermediate fiction class will explore flash fiction (generally considered to be fiction 250-1000 words in length) as well as other forms of short fiction. There is much discussion about what exactly flash is and what parameters define it—whether it be length, the presence of narrative vs lyrical language, experimental form, emotional density of content, etc. We’ll read and write widely to interrogate what flash fiction is and how we’ll go about writing it
 
Though this class is specifically focused on flash fiction, we will discuss and dabble in other short forms as well – sudden fiction (2000 words), prose poetry, smoke-long stories, palm-of-the-hand stories, micro fiction, nanofiction, hint fiction (25 words), 6-word stories, flash nonfiction, stories told in series and more. We’ll investigate the boundaries of genre—fiction, nonfiction and poetry—in these compressed forms, which makes this a great class for writers of all genres who are looking to experiment with what can be done in a small space.

English 3466: Special Topics in Intermediate Poetry Writing 
Instructor: Margaret Colvett 
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing poetry. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored. 

English 3468: Special Topics in Intermediate Creative Nonfiction Writing 
Instructor: David Grandouiller 
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing creative nonfiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored. 

English 3662 (10): An Introduction to Literary Publishing 
Instructor: Kaiya Gordon 
An introduction to the theory and practice of editing and publishing literature. 

English 3662 (20): An Introduction to Literary Publishing 
Instructor: Daniel Barnum-Swett 
An introduction to the theory and practice of editing and publishing literature. 
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