Autumn 2019 3000-Level Courses

1000-level | 2000-level | 3000-level | 4000-level | 5000-level and above

English-3150: Career Preparation for Humanities Majors
Instructor:
Jennifer Patton
This general elective course helps English majors and students from other Humanities disciplines to explore and prepare for careers after graduation. Students will analyze texts to gain a practical and theoretical understanding of the world of work. They will learn to identify their own strengths and preferences to guide their job activity and career choices.


English-3271: Structure of the English Language
Instructor:
Staff
Students learn basic characteristics of English linguistics focusing on the basic building blocks of language; the sounds of English and how they are put together, word formation processes and rules for combining words into utterances/sentences. Students investigate and explore linguistic variation, accents of American English and the implications of language evaluation in educational settings.
GE: Cultures & Ideas


English-3304: Business and Professional Writing
Instructor:
Christa Teston
In this course students will learn principles and practices associated with writing well in business and professional contexts. Students will receive feedback on prose writing and receive several opportunities to refine their style, organization and collaborative writing strategies. Most in-class time will involve workshopping course deliverables and writing collaboratively.


English-3304: Business and Professional Writing
Instructor:
John Jones
The study of principles and practices of business and professional writing.


English-3304: Business and Professional Writing
Instructor:
Yanar Hashlamon
This course examines the writing practices and contemporary issues workers face in professional environments. Students will produce documents in different modes, including text, image and video, focusing on accessible and ethical communication practices. This is a community-oriented class, encouraging intersectional class consciousness towards the Columbus area and its populations both represented and absent from our classroom. Students will be given time in-class to complete assignments and write collaboratively.  


English-3304: Business and Professional Writing
Instructor:
Jason Collins
The study of principles and practices of business and professional writing.


English-3305: Technical Writing
Instructor:
Susan Lang
Study of principles and practices of technical writing. Emphasis on the style, organization and conventions of technical and research reports, proposals, memoranda, professional correspondence, etc.


English-3305: Technical Writing
Instructor:
Staff
Study of principles and practices of technical writing. Emphasis on the style, organization and conventions of technical and research reports, proposals, memoranda, professional correspondence, etc.


English-3361: Narrative and Medicine
Instructor:
Jim Phelan
This course explores the idea that narrative competence increases medical competence. In other words, it investigates the hypothesis that medical practitioners who become aware of the importance of stories and storytelling and knowledgeable about how stories work will become more effective caregivers. As we test that hypothesis, we will address the following questions: How does narrative give us greater insight into illness, medical treatment, doctor-patient relationships and other aspects of health and medicine? How do illness and other experiences within the realm of medicine influence ways of telling stories? How do doctors' perspectives and patients' perspectives differ, and what, if anything, should be done to close those differences? In order to increase our own narrative competence, we will look at narrative in different media--drama, print (fiction and nonfiction), comics and film--and consider core concepts of narrative (plot, character, space, time, perspective, dialogue, ethics and aesthetics). We will also consider a range of medical conditions and issues from mortality to ethics, from cancer (illness and treatment) to kidney transplants. Since the course is populated by students majoring in a great variety of disciplines, we will also consider how our different disciplinary perspectives relate to each other: to what extent do they overlap, complement, or occasionally conflict with each other as we think about the nexus between narrative and medicine?
GE: Literature


English-3364: Special Topics in Popular Culture—Insurgent Youth: Punk, Riot Grrrl and Black Metal
Instructor:
Thomas Davis
How do cultural worlds respond to moments of political distress? How can music, art and lifestyles model other ways of living and thinking? This class pursues these two questions by investigating three distinct subcultures: punk, riot grrrl and black metal. We will listen to a wide range of music, placing it in its historical context and tracing its lasting influences. Readings and viewings will range across documentary films, memoirs, cultural theory, zines and other literary and visual texts. Our class will also host visits from music journalists, scholars and participants in these three subcultures.
GE: Cultures & Ideas


English-3372 (10): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy
Instructor:
Jian Chen
Examining science fiction and/or fantasy.
GE: Literature


English-3372 (20): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy: Feminism and Science Fiction

Instructor: Beth Hewitt

Since Mary Shelley birthed Frankenstein’s monster, science fiction has been devoted to issues that are crucial to the history of feminism: alterity and equity. The imagination of other worlds, other places, other species, other laws has the unique ability to make the familiarities of sexism strange. In this class, we will read some of the canonical texts of science fiction focused on issues involving sexuality, gender, reproduction and corporeality, including Mary Shelley, Ursula LeGuin, Margaret Atwood, James Tiptree, Jr., Samuel Delany, Judith Merril and Octavia Butler.
GE: Literature


English-3372 (50): Science Fiction and/or Fantasy
Instructor:
 Katelyn Hartke
Examining science fiction and/or fantasy. Octavia Butler.

GE: Literature


English-3378: Special Topics in Film and Literature—Film and Comics: Race, Class, Sexuality, and Differently Abled

​​Instructor: Frederick Aldama

Have you ever wondered why you love watching superhero movies or reading comics? Why do we pay money to go see something that we know is clearly not real?

This course examines the art of film and comics storytelling and, simultaneously, the emotion and cognitive responses that they trigger. We will focus on the contemporary period to see how filmmakers and comic book creators build their storyworlds as well as audience consumption. We will also explore the crosspollination of devices used to give shape to filmic and comic book storytelling modes. We will acquire theoretical concepts and tools to understand better how our set of films and comics are built and how they might make (or not) new our perception, thought, and feeling concerning issues of racism, ableism, misogyny, homophobia and the like.

We will view and analyze: Patty Jenkins's Wonder Woman (2017); Jon Favreau's Iron Man (2008); George Miller's Mad Max: Fury Road (2015); Christopher Nolan's Batman Begins (2005), The Dark Knight (2008), The Dark Knight Rises (2012); M. Night Shyamalan's Unbreakable (2000); Guillermo del Toro's Pacific Rim (2013); Danny Boyle's 28 Days Later (2002); James Mangold's Logan (2017); Zack Snyder's Justice League (2017); Ryan Coogler's Black Panther (2018); Taika Waititi's Thor: Ragnarok (2017); Edgar Wright's Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (2010); Bob Persichetti et al.: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (2018); Jill Thompson's Wonder Woman: The True Amazon (2016); George Miller et al.: Mad Max: Fury Road (2015); Bryan Lee O'Malley Scott Pilgrim vs. the World Vol. 1 (2004); Steve Niles's 28 Days Later: Aftermath; Travis Beacham's Pacific Rim: Tales from the Drift (2016); Ta-Nehisi Coates' Black Panther & the Crew (2017).
GE: Cultures & Ideas


English-3379: Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy
Instructor:
Susan Lang
Introduction to the interrelated fields of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy, familiarizing students with key concepts that underlie work in these interrelated fields and to the scholarly methods of WRL. Together, this discipline studies the ways people use language and other symbols to convey messages, persuade audiences and create meaning, and how these practices are learned and taught.


English-3379: Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy
Instructor:
John Jones
Introduction to the interrelated fields of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy, familiarizing students with key concepts that underlie work in these interrelated fields and to the scholarly methods of WRL. Together, this discipline studies the ways people use language and other symbols to convey messages, persuade audiences and create meaning, and how these practices are learned and taught.


English-3398 (10): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
Jacob Risinger
In this gateway course, we will take our cue from one of George Orwell’s famous lines: “If people cannot write well, they cannot think well, and if they cannot think well, others will do their thinking for them.” Over the course of the semester, our weekly readings, discussions and informal exercises will work to annihilate old patterns of complacent reading—leaving in their place the analytical skills and rhetorical strategies you need to establish your own critical/original perspective on literary texts. We will attend to the practical work of conducting literary research and writing solid, well-argued essays—but we will also practice using literary theory and various methods of criticism to identify new levels of meaning, even in familiar or (seemingly) straightforward texts. The hard work of writing and analysis will be supplemented by an array of engaging texts. Along the way, we’ll read poetry by W.B. Yeats, Elizabeth Bishop and Claudia Rankine; Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale; Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; and Jesmyn Ward’s novel Salvage the Bones (recipient of the 2011 National Book Award). Requirements will include attendance, active participation, informal writing exercises and five essays.


English-3398 (20): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
Jill Galvan
This course is designed to strengthen skills in interpretive reading and writing. It will help students with their English major courses, as well as cultivate their fluency in analyzing texts of all kinds, beyond the classroom. Our focus will be on reading with an eye for fine detail and on constructing logical, well-evidenced arguments. The syllabus will cover the major genres--novel, short story, poetry, drama and possibly film--and will range from the classic to the contemporary. A very tentative list for the short stories and novels includes works by Herman Melville, Robert Louis Stevenson, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Kate Chopin, Raymond Carver, Octavia Butler, Jhumpa Lahiri, Alison Bechdel, Justin Torres and Carmen Machado. In class, I will be providing guidance, terminology and a critical framework, but most meetings will be run as active discussions. Tentative assignments: two papers, 3-5 pages each; two papers, 5-7 pages each; a critical research exercise; regular reading quizzes and engaged class participation.


English-3398 (30): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
Susan Williams
This course's purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing. We will use a textbook, Steven Lynn's Texts and Contexts, to study a range of critical approaches to literary study and apply them to poems and short stories. We will also study Celeste Ng's Little Fires Everywhere as a re-reading of Nathaniel Hawthorne's Scarlet Letter, considering how authors build on each other as they practice their craft.


English-3398: Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
Francis Donoghue
This course's purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing.


English-3398: Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
Christopher Jones
This course's purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing.


English-3398: Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor:
Sarah Neville
This class is designed to support students in developing the skills they need to be successful English majors. Over the course of the term students will learn the types, tools and methods of literary criticism that English scholars employ as they construct projects in both print and digital media. Along the way we will read a novel by Robertson Davies, short stories by Dorothy Parker, Lorrie Moore, Donald Barthelme and George Saunders, a play by Djanet Sears and poems by Billy-Ray Belcourt. Students will complete in-class exercises and multiple short writing assignments that ultimately build toward a longer research paper.


English-3405 (10) : Special Topics in Professional Communication—Technical Editing
Instructor:
Jonathan Buehl
An introduction to the skills and processes used when editing technical documents.

No background in technical content areas or technical writing is required to do well in this class.


English-3465 (20): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing
Instructor: 
Christopher Santantasio
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing fiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are 


English-3465 (30): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing—Writing Against Convention
Instructor: Scott Broker
In this intermediate fiction course, we will be focusing our attention on reading and writing work that challenges traditional modes of narrative realism. From genre blending to structural innovation, unconventional subject matter to non-standard logic, we will pursue and embrace that which is often seen as strange, taboo, uncanny or queer, working to understand how these stories work in relation to the conventions of fiction. We will begin by analyzing a wide range of texts to situate ourselves within the history of unconventional writing. From these stories, we will pull tricks and tools that will help in the development of our own unique voices. The reading list is diverse and challenging, and I ask and expect you to read with an open mind. Some possible authors include: Diane Cook, Mariana Enriquez, Samanta Schweblin, Deb Olin Unferth, Miranda July, Ben Marcus, Jamaica Kincaid, Lesley Nneka Arimah, Carmen Maria Machado, Kelly Link, Karen Russell, Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah, Joy Williams, Ottessa Moshfegh, Helen Oyeyemi, Catherine Lacey, Yukiko Motoya, Rita Bullwinkel and Aimee Bender.
The rest of our time together will be a workshop. As you have already done in your introductory fiction course, you will read your peers’ writing closely, offering sincere and engaged feedback in the form of both written responses and in-class discussion. You will also share your own writing with the class and get the chance to see your work from the perspective of a committed, generous, detail-oriented readership. Each student will workshop at least two stories over the course of the term, and will turn in a significant revision of one of those stories at the end of the semester.


English-3466: Special Topics in Intermediate Poetry Writing
Instructor:
Margaret Brown
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing poetry. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.


English-3467S: Issues and Methods in Tutoring Writing
Instructor:
Beverly Moss
This course trains students to be effective tutors in the OSU Writing Center or within the Writing Associates Program, which includes learning and applying strategies for working with writers of all levels and writing at all stages of completion and comprehension. Through observation-work, students will learn about the day-to-day activities of a University Writing Center, and how tutors conduct themselves during their sessions with clients. Additionally, we will discuss different strategies that will help tutors as they work with English Language Learners. Students will also be trained in face-to-face and online tutoring methods, as well as individual and group tutoring methods. Ultimately, this course should help students to feel more confident in their roles as writing consultants, and will shed insight into consulting strategies. This course is discussion-based and aims to engage students' areas of interest and expertise to the formal study of writing, literacy and writing centers. This course will offer training in research methods and data analysis and will use the Writing Center as a research space, with a hands-on practical learning component that includes observation, supervised tutoring and ultimately concludes with employment opportunities at the OSU Writing Center or within the Writing Associates Program.


English-3468: Special Topics in Intermediate Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor:
Josie Kochendorfer
For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing creative nonfiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.


English-3662: An Introduction to Literary Publishing
Instructor:
Robert Schumaker
An introduction to the theory and practice of editing and publishing literature.

 
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