Autumn 2019 2000-Level Courses

1000-level | 2000-level | 3000-level | 4000-level | 5000-level and above

English-2201: Selected Works of British Literature—Medieval through 1800
Instructor:
Karen Winstead and Staff
This survey will introduce students to the vibrant minds and culture that produced the masterpieces of our British literary heritage. Students will sample the writings of poets, playwrights, essayists and novelists including Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton and Johnson. Students will get to know the worlds they inhabited, the issues they cared about and how they may have thought about themselves as artists and human beings. While exploring the past, students will find surprising precedents for popular genres of our own day, including horror, romance and graphic narrative.
English 2201 is a foundational course for English majors but it is also a rewarding experience for anyone seeking an appreciation of our literary heritage. Lectures will sketch out the contours of literary history and weekly recitations will provide opportunities for group close reading and discussion. Requirements include a final exam, a journal of responses to the readings and weekly online quizzes on the lectures.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English-2201H: Selected Works of British Literature—Medieval through 1800
Instructor:
Leslie Lockett
This course introduces students to some of the major British literary texts written from the early Middle Ages through the late eighteenth century, including Beowulf, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Milton's Paradise Lost and Aphra Behn's Oroonoko. Our approach to the literature will emphasize close reading, form and genre, and historical context. Students will develop their research skills by means of a researched essay or creative project. Other requirements include three response papers and a final exam.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English-2220: Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructors:
Hannibal Hamlin
For four centuries now, William Shakespeare has been widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language. He's certainly the most influential. More has been written about Shakespeare than any other writer in the history of the world, no joke. His plays have been adapted into countless other plays, novels, poems, music, paintings, films, TV shows and comics, and not only in English but in German, Russian, Spanish, Japanese, Hindi and Yoruba. We will read a sampling of Shakespeare's plays in a variety of genres and over the course of his career. We'll think about how his plays work as theater; how he adapts and transforms the source material on which so many of his plays depend; how Shakespeare can be such an "original" when he borrows so much from other writers; how he can create such deep and realistic characters; and how it is that Shakespeare can accomplish all of the above (and more) through language. What we'll discover is that, as one critic put it, the remarkable thing about Shakespeare is that he is really very good - in spite of all the people who say he is very good. 

Plays will include Henry IV Part 1, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Hamlet, Macbeth and Cymbeline, and we'll also read some non-dramatic poems.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English-2220: Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructors:
Luke Wilson
Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English-2220: Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructors:
Staff
Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English-2220H: Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructor:
Sarah Neville
This class for honors students will approach a selection of Shakespeare's most and least-known plays through several methods, examining these works not only as historical artifacts rooted in the time and place of their creation, but also as spectacles that are best illuminated by live performance. In order to better enable us to consider the ways that staged properties and special effects are crucial parts of Shakespeare's stagecraft, this section of "Introduction to Shakespeare" is especially interested in the practical means through which Shakespeare's plays (and the earliest printed books they appeared in) resonate with both historical and contemporary audiences and readers. Through in-class exercises, field trips, and assignments in costuming, casting, producing and directing, we will seek to answer questions like:
How was the English stage of 1592 different from a typical American stage of 2019?
How does a production pretend to cut someone's hands off?
How can two unrelated actors simulate playing twins?
What did Elizabethans think a medieval battle looked like?
How does a dead character returning as a ghost look differently from the way he did when he was alive?
What happens when a boy actor plays a female role? or a female actor plays a male one?
Who censored Shakespeare's plays, and why?
Class progress will be evaluated by research-based writing assignments, quizzes, a creative group project and a final exam.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English-2260: Introduction to Poetry
Instructor:
Jennifer Higginbotham
This is a class about how to read a poem. We'll be doing the literary equivalent of taking apart an engine to see how it works, breaking down poetry into its various components, including word choice, sentence structure, figures of speech, meter, rhyme, structure and genre. Sheila Wolosky's The Art of Poetry will be our guiding text along with a variety of poems from the English tradition, from the sixteenth century to the present day.
GE: Literature


English-2260: Introduction to Poetry
Instructor:
Staff
Designed to help students understand and appreciate poetry through an intensive study of a representative group of poems.
GE: Literature


English-2261: Introduction to Fiction
Instructors:
Sandra MacPherson
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.
GE: Literature


English-2261: Introduction to Fiction—"Game of Thrones" as Literature
Instructors:
Elizabeth Renker
This new class celebrates the conclusion to a beloved HBO series.  Even the most dedicated fans might not realize that Game of Thrones is also a skilled and complex work of literature tied to a long history of literary concepts and approaches. This class will train you in core analytical methods that will enable newcomers to the series as well as longstanding fans to understand Game of Thrones at a deeper level of richness and pleasure.
This is a second-session autumn semester class that will proceed at a double-time pace. We will thus focus only on the first two seasons of the HBO series, although all students are required to watch the entire series before our class begins. (We will not read or discuss the books by George R.R. Martin.) Class sessions on TWTh will run as a mixture of short lecture and discussion; come to class every day prepared and ready to apply the terms and skills we are learning. Fri. classes will be conducted online in the form of a short (250-500 word) written exercise applying what we have learned that week.
Textbooks: an HBO subscription; readings posted on Carmen. Requirements: daily attendance; active participation in discussion; daily in-class brief quizzes; short (250-500 word) weekly written exercises on Fridays.
GE: Literature


English-2261: Introduction to Fiction
Instructors:
David Brewer
This course will examine the central building blocks of fiction—plot, character, narration/point of view and setting—and how they contribute to our reading experience. Our emphasis throughout will be on how fiction works and why we should care about its workings. Likely readings will include The Secret History, Gone Girl, In Cold Blood, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, Donald Ray Pollock, Shirley Jackson, James Thurber, Viet Thahn Nguyen, H. P. Lovecraft and Claire Voye Watkins. Assignments will include a weekly reading journal, four short written exercises, a final project and active participation in our discussions.

GE: Literature


English-2261: Introduction to Fiction
Instructors:
Staff
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.
GE: Literature


English-2261H: Introduction to Fiction
Instructors:
Jessica Prinz
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.
GE: Literature


English-2263 (10): Introduction to Film
Instructor:
Frederick Luis Aldama and Staff
This course will offer methods and approaches for understanding the devices used (mise-en-scene, lensing, sound, editing, casting and so on) by film directors to give shape to their various distillations and reconstructions of the building blocks of reality. We will be attuned to how films trigger our perception, thought, and feeling systems. We will explore the sociopolitical contexts of making, distributing, and consuming film. We will explore how a film director gives shape through visual and auditory means to a filmic blueprint that triggers real emotions and thoughts about the world.

We will view and analyze: Wes Andersen's The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014); Darren Aronofsky's Black Swan (2010); Ryan Coogler's Black Panther (2017); Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now (1979); Cary Joji Fukunaga's Sin Nombre (2009); Barry Jenkins's Moonlight (2016); Richard Kelly's Donnie Darko (2001); Stanley Kubrik's 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) & The Shining (1980); Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing (1989); Terence Malick's Badlands (1973); Fernando Meirelles's City of God (2002); George Miller's Mad Max: Fury Road (2015); Christopher Nolan's Memento (2000) & The Dark Knight (2008); Jordan Peele's Get Out (2017); Jason Reitman's Juno (2007); Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction (1994); Guillermo del Toro's The Shape of Water (2017); Orson Wells's Touch of Evil (1968); Joe Wright's Atonement (2007).
GE: VPA


English-2264: Introduction to Popular Culture Studies
Instructor:
Jared Gardner
Introduction to the analysis of popular culture texts.
GE: Cultures & Ideas.
This is a combined section class. Cross-listed in CompStd.


English-2264: Introduction to Popular Culture Studies
Instructor:
Staff
Introduction to the analysis of popular culture texts.
GE: Cultures & Ideas.
This is a combined section class. Cross-listed in CompStd.


English-2265 (10): Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructors:
Kirsten Edwards
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.


English-2265 (20): Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructors:
Meagan McAlister
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.


English-2265 (30): Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructors:
Krishna Mishra
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.


English-2265 (40): Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructors:
Sheldon Costa
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.


English-2266: Introductory Poetry Writing
Instructors:
Kaiya Gordon
In this introductory level poetry workshop, you will learn how to be a more adept poetry reader, writer and community member. By the end of the class, you will have developed tools and techniques for your craft, be fluent in the landscape of contemporary poetry and have participated in the workshopping of poems by yourself and your classmates. Authors taught will include Claudia Rankine, Franny Choi and Columbus's own Ruth Awad, as well as a variety of other writers exploring the edges of genre and poetic appplication.

Prereq: 1110. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.


English-2266: Introductory Poetry Writing
Instructors:
Margaret Colvett
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, composition, and prosody; practice in the writing of poetry; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published poems by established poets. Prereq: 1110. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.


English-2267: Introduction to Creative Writing
Instructor:
Kamal Kimball
"Don't tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass." --Anton Chekhov          
The goal of this course is to introduce you to writing as an artistic practice. Students will learn how to capture moments from life, details like Chekhov's glint of light on broken glass, and turn them into unique expressions that are all your own. The art and craft of writing is a process of turning inward and a method of looking outward. In this course, student will do both. The course will focus on prompted creative writing assignments which will allow you to turn inward and explore new writing strategies, helping you to strengthen your voice. Everyone has a story to tell and this course will help you become a stronger writer, regardless of starting experience level.

Students will also turn outward via peer workshops, readings, and informative class discussions. Students will have the opportunity to share their writing in a supportive environment for thoughtful feedback from a group of engaged peers. This course will include meaningful engagement with contemporary 20th century writing.


English-2267: Introduction to Creative Writing
Instructor:
 Molly Oritz
The purpose of this class is to introduce you to writing as an artistic practice. We will begin by approaching each genre (creative nonfiction, poetry, and fiction) as readers, analyzing a wide range of styles and forms to better situate ourselves within the current state of contemporary literature. From these texts, we will uncover tricks and tools that will help in the development of your own unique voice. In addition to poems, essays, and short stories, we will be reading several craft pieces, or instructional texts on the art of writing. Our reading list is diverse and challenging, and I ask and expect you to read with an open mind. Some possible authors include: Danez Smith, Layli Long Soldier, Solmaz Sharif, Ocean Vuong, Kaveh Akbar, Tracy K. Smith, Leslie Jamison, Lia Purpura, Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib, Alexander Chee, Eula Biss, Diane Cook, Miranda July, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Carmen Maria Machado. 

The rest of our time together will be a workshop. This means that you will read your peers’ writing closely, offering sincere and engaged feedback in the form of both written responses and in-class discussion. You will also share your own writing with the class and get the chance to see your work from the perspective of a committed, generous, detail-oriented readership. Each student will workshop one poem, one short essay, and one short story over the course of the term. Through this, you will expand your range of writing skills—pushing yourself to be curious, fearless, and voracious—as a way of getting closer to understanding both who you already are as a writer, and who you might want to become. 

English-2268 (10): Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor:
Sophie Newman
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, and composition; practice in the writing of creative nonfiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published essays by masters of the many forms of creative nonfiction.


English-2268 (20): Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor:
David Grandouiller
An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, and composition; practice in the writing of creative nonfiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published essays by masters of the many forms of creative nonfiction.


English-2269: Digital Media Composing
Instructor:
Staff
A composition course in which students analyze and compose digital media texts while studying complex forms and practices of textual production.
GE: VPA


English-2275: Thematic Approaches to Literature—Slavery and the Novel, 1660-1990
Instructor:
Roxann Wheeler
During this time period, concepts of slavery shifted from featuring European-born slaves in the Mediterranean to featuring African-born slaves in the Caribbean and Europe. The course investigates the racial, gender and class dynamics of the storylines of literature during the height of slavery and abolition. We will read a small selection of the neo-slave narratives written in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries that reflect critically on the earlier period.
GE: Literature


English-2276: Arts of Persuasion
Instructor:
Staff
Introduces students to the study and practice of rhetoric and how arguments are shaped by technology, media and cultural contexts.
GE: Cultures & Ideas


English-2277: Introduction to Disability Studies
Instructor:
Staff
This course investigates the ways that disability is composed.
GE: Cultures & Ideas


English-2280H: The English Bible—The Bible as Literature
Instructor:
Hannibal Hamlin
The Bible contains some of the weirdest and most wonderful literature you will ever read, and there is certainly no book that has had a greater influence on English and American literature from Beowulf to Paradise Lost, Pilgrim’s Progress to The Chronicles of Narnia, Whitman’s Song of Myself to Morrison’s Song of Solomon. We will read a selection of biblical books in order to gain some appreciation of the Bible’s wide range of literary genres, forms, styles and topics. Our discussion will include the nature of biblical narrative and characterization, the function of prophecy and its relation to history, the peculiar nature of biblical poetry, so-called Wisdom literature, anomalous books like Job and The Song of Songs (including the historical process of canonization that made them “biblical” and the kinds of interpretation that have been used to make them less strange), the relationship between (in traditional Christian terms) the Old and New Testaments (including typology, the symbolic linking of characters, events, themes, and images in the books before and after the Incarnation) and the unity (or lack thereof) of the Bible as a whole.

As occasion warrants, we will also look at some of the diverse ways the Bible has been read and interpreted––the stranger the better––by poets and writers, artists and film-makers over the past millennia.

Do note: this is NOT a course in religion, but rather an English course on the Bible as a literary work. Any and all faiths, or none, are welcome, and none will be privileged. 

Text: The English Bible: King James Version (2 vols.), ed. Herbert Marks (1) and Gerald Hammond and Austin Busch (2), Norton Critical Edition
Course requirements: Evaluation will be based on active participation in class discussion and activities, regular reading quizzes, two short essays, a mid-term test and a final exam.
GE: Literature


English-2281: Introduction to African-American Literature
Instructor:
Koritha Mitchell
A study of representative literary works by African-American writers from 1760 to the present.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
This is a combined lecture class. Cross-listed in AfAmASt


English-2282: Introduction to Queer Studies-- Queer & Trans Cultures and Movements
Instructors:
Staff
Introduces and problematizes foundational concepts of the interdisciplinary field of queer studies, highlighting the intersections of sexuality with race, class, and nationality.
GE: Cultures & Ideas
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
This is a combined section class. Cross-listed in WGSS.


English-2367.01: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience
Instructors:
Staff
Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)


English-2367.02: Literature in the U.S. Experience
Instructor:
Staff
Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)


English-2367.02H: Literature in the U.S. Experience
Instructor:
Staff
Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)


English 2367.03: Documentary in the U.S. Experience
Instructor:
Staff
An intermediate course that extends and refines skills in critical reading and expository writing through analysis of written texts, video and documentaries.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)


English-2367.05: The U.S. Folk Experience
Instructor:
Martha Sims
Concepts of American folklore and ethnography; folk groups, tradition, and fieldwork methodology; how these contribute to the development of critical reading, writing and thinking skills.
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)


English-2367.05H: The U.S. Folk Experience
Instructor:
Amy Shuman
This course teaches students to listen, observe and write about what they learn using three different writing styles. We will spend time designing a project and deciding on a cultural site for students' listening and observing. The cultural site could be an artistic practice involving food, dance, music, etc. or a          
social/cultural practice involving a group students belong to. Students will have the opportunity to use three writing styles to describe the same cultural event or practice: an objective, third person paper; a confessional first person paper and a third paper in which students select the style most appropriate for their subject matter. We will work on revising and editing, and students will revise each of their papers and comment on other students' papers. For the final paper, students will be asked to write a paragraph explaining their stylistic choice.
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)


English-2367.06: Composing Disability in the US
Instructor:
Kelsey Busby
Our course will explore how texts portray the future; specifically, we will focus on representations of the future that exclude marginalized communities, including people with disabilities. Additionally, our course will focus on providing a foundation for theoretical approaches in disability studies and futurity studies. We will read texts written by disabled and non-disabled writers. We will explore how futurity often adopts a medical model of disability, one which argues that an ideal future is one where disabilities have been cured. Through discussions of these representations, we will not only be able to analyze and think critically about fictional and non-fictional accounts of disability, but we will also understand responses to disability in contemporary culture. We will also learn how to recognize and respond to ableist language and the exclusion of disabled voices and identities. We will bring our conversations about disability and futurity in line with utopianism. In order to speculate about the future - about utopia - one would have to imagine having power to enact this change.

Students will be asked to address topics within disability studies, utopian studies and futurity studies through acknowledging these topics’ veracity in specific contemporary examples and fields. Ultimately, this class seeks to articulate a disabled future: one where utopianism and critical futurity can be ideological tools motivating activist intervention and social dreaming. This course will emphasize interdisciplinary interactions through discussions, texts, and writing projects and will ask students to challenge their growing skills in composition and analysis through multimodal assignments.

2367.06 can be taken for credit towards the undergraduate disability studies minor. Please see the main disabilities studies page for more information.

Extends & refines expository writing & analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality & reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education & pop culture in America. Only one decimal subdivision of English 2367 may be taken for credit.
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)


English-2367.07S: Literacy Narratives of Black Columbus (Service Learning)
Instructor:
Beverly Moss
English 2367.07S satisfies the University’s GE requirement for social diversity and the U.S. experience and second-level writing. The primary goals of this course are to sharpen your expository writing, critical thinking and analytical skills through a service-learning framework. The “S” in the course number means that this second-level writing class has been designated as a service learning writing course. You will read about the importance of undertaking life history and literacy narrative projects, with a particular focus on preserving the literacy history of Columbus-area Black communities. Collecting and analyzing literacy narratives (or literacy stories) is an important research strategy that can be used to document the history and current activities of any community. It is especially important in Black communities where their/our literacy practices have often been under-reported or negatively characterized.
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)


English-2463: Introduction to Video Games Analysis
Instructor:
Staff
An introduction to humanities-based methods of analyzing and interpreting video games in terms of form, genre, style and theory. No background in video game play is necessary. All students will have regular opportunities for hands-on experience with different game types and genres in both the computer-based classroom and the Department of English Video Game Lab.
GE: VPA

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