Autumn 2018: 3000-Level Courses

1000-level 2000-level | 3000-level | 4000-level | 5000-level and above | Main courses page

English 3150 (10)—Career Preparation for English and Related Majors
Instructor
: Jennifer Patton

This general elective course helps English majors and students from other Humanities disciplines to explore and prepare for careers after graduation. Students will analyze texts to gain a practical and theoretical understanding of the world of work. They will learn to identify their own strengths and preferences to guide their job activity and career choices.


English 3271—Structure of the English Language
Instructor
: Staff

Students learn basic characteristics of English linguistics focusing on the basic building blocks of language; the sounds of English and how they are put together, word formation processes and rules for combining words into utterances/sentences. Students investigate and explore linguistic variation, accents of American English and the implications of language evaluation in educational settings.


English 3304 (50)—Business and Professional Writing
Instructor
: John Jones

The study of principles and practices of business and professional writing.


English 3304—Business and Professional Writing
Instructor
: Staff

The study of principles and practices of business and professional writing.


English 3305 (10)—Technical Writing
Instructor
: Samuel Head

The study of principles and practices of technical writing. Emphasis on the style, organization and conventions of technical and research reports, proposals, memoranda, professional correspondence, etc.


English 3305—Technical Writing
Instructor
: Staff

The study of principles and practices of technical writing. Emphasis on the style, organization and conventions of technical and research reports, proposals, memoranda, professional correspondence, etc.


English 3331 (10)—Thinking Theoretically
Instructor
: Sandra MacPherson

Study of fundamental texts and practices informing contemporary understandings of theory in the humanities and social sciences.

GE: Literature


English 3361 (10)—Narrative and Medicine
Instructor
: James Phelan

Study of fictional and nonfictional narratives offering diverse perspectives on such medical issues as illness, aging, health and healing, treatment and doctor-patient relationships.

GE: Literature


English 3364—Special Topics in Pop Culture
Instructor
: Staff

Focused study in reading popular culture texts, organized around a single theme, period or medium.

GE: Cultures and Ideas


English 3364 (30)—Special Topics in Pop Culture: True Crime
Instructor
: Elizabeth Hewitt

This course will study the long and varied tradition of true crime narratives. Beginning with the stories of witches, murderers, and sexual vandals that so captivated their 17th century audiences, to Victorian serial murderers like Jack the Ripper, to modern celebrity crimes and criminals, students will consider why writers and readers so often turn to blood, violence and malfeasance as the stuff of entertainment. We will read in a wide variety of genres (confession narratives, novels, exposes, genre fiction) and in a wide variety of media (books, comics, television, film) as we traverse the long history of this literary and cultural form. Authors will include: Edgar Allen Poe, Alan Moore, Truman Capote, Vincent Bugliosi, Janet Malcolm and James Ellroy.

GE: Cultures and Ideas


English 3372 (10)—Science Fiction and/or Fantasy: FutureNow
Instructor
: Jared Gardner

We often think about science fictions as speculations about the distant future, but the genre is always thinking about the present. In this class we will be focusing on speculative fictions set in a not-so-distant future which ask us to consider how the decisions we make today can shape our future worlds.

GE: Literature


English 3372—Science Fiction and/or Fantasy
Instructor
: Staff

Introduction to the tradition and practice of speculative writing. Provides students the opportunity to examine and compare works of science fiction and/or fantasy.

GE: Literature


English 3378 (10)—Special Topics in Film and Literature
Instructor
: Frederick Aldama

Have you ever wondered why you love watching superhero movies or reading comics? Why do we pay money to go see something that we know is clearly not real? This course examines the art of film and comics storytelling and, simultaneously, the emotion and cognitive responses that they trigger. We will focus on the contemporary period to see how filmmakers and comic book creators build their storyworlds as well as audience consumption. We will also explore the crosspollination of devices used to give shape to filmic and comic book storytelling modes. We will acquire theoretical concepts and tools to understand better how our set of films and comics are built and how they might make (or not) new our perception, thought, and feeling concerning issues of racism, ableism, misogyny, homophobia and the like.

GE: Cultures and Ideas


English 3379 (10)—Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy
Instructor
: Susan Lang

Introduction to the interrelated fields of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy, familiarizing students with key concepts that underlie work in these interrelated fields and to the scholarly methods of WRL. Together, this discipline studies the ways people use language and other symbols to convey messages, persuade audiences, and create meaning and how these practices are learned and taught.


English 3379 (20)—Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy
Instructor
: Jonathan Buehl

Introduction to the interrelated fields of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy, familiarizing students with key concepts that underlie work in these interrelated fields and to the scholarly methods of WRL. Together, this discipline studies the ways people use language and other symbols to convey messages, persuade audiences, and create meaning and how these practices are learned and taught.


English 3398 (10)—Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor
: Koritha Mitchell

This class will introduce students to a variety of "methods" for literary studies. It builds on the critical thinking and writing skills that students already possess by offering opportunities to put forth clear, thesis-driven arguments. We will cover several theoretical approaches to literature. In many cases, we will examine Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby through different lenses in order to get a feel for how these approaches illuminate the richness of a single text. To further test the theories introduced, we will read other literary forms, including drama and poetry.

REQUIRED READING will include:
F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby
Lois Tyson, Critical Theory Today, 3rd edition
(all other texts available electronically)

REQUIREMENTS will likely include: thoughtful class participation, three essays, a library assignment, and a thesis-driven oral presentation. So, students enrolling in this section of 3398 should welcome the opportunity to practice their public speaking skills.


English 3398 (20)—Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor
: Jacob Risinger

In this gateway course, we’ll take our cue from one of George Orwell’s famous lines: “If people cannot write well, they cannot think well, and if they cannot think well, others will do their thinking for them.”  Over the course of the semester, our weekly readings, discussions, and informal exercises will work to annihilate old patterns of complacent reading—leaving in their place the analytical skills and rhetorical strategies you need to establish your own critical/original perspective on literary texts.   We’ll attend to the practical work of conducting literary research and writing solid, well-argued essays—but we’ll also practice using literary theory and various methods of criticism to identify new levels of meaning, even in familiar or (seemingly) straightforward texts.  The hard work of writing and analysis will be supplemented by an array of engaging texts.  We’ll start with The Winter’s Tale—one of Shakespeare’s “problem plays”—and end with Tom Stoppard’s recent play The Hard Problem.  Along the way, we’ll read poetry by Yeats, Elizabeth Bishop and Claudia Rankine; short stories by James Baldwin, Raymond Carver and Nathaniel Hawthorne; and Jesmyn Ward’s novel Salvage the Bones (recipient of the 2011 National Book Award).  Requirements will include attendance, active participation, informal writing exercises and five essays.


English 3398 (30)—Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor
: Antony Shuttleworth

This course is designed as the gateway to the English major. The course emphasizes the skills required to make the transition from a "reader" to a "critic" of literary texts: close reading; an introduction to literary theory and methods of criticism; library research; methods of writing papers with a clear argument, effectively selected evidence and virtually no errors of grammar, punctuation, usage and style—the requirements for excellence in upper division courses. The basis for analysis and discussion will be the different ways in which human evil has been represented in literature, examined mainly in poems and short stories. 

Joseph Kelly (ed.), The Seagull Reader: Poems, second edition (Norton)
Joseph Kelly (ed.), The Seagull Reader: Stories, second edition (Norton)
Steven Lynn, Texts and Contexts: Writing About Literature with Critical Theory, sixth edition (Longman)


English 3398 (60)—Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor
: Sandra MacPherson

Serves as the "Methods" course for the Literature and Creative Writing concentrations within the English major. Its purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing. Required of English majors. Open to English majors only or others by department permission.


English 3398 (70)—Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor
: Sean O’Sullivan

Serves as the "Methods" course for the Literature and Creative Writing concentrations within the English major. Its purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing. Required of English majors. Open to English majors only or others by department permission.


English 3398 (80)—Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor
: Ethan Knapp

Serves as the "Methods" course for the Literature and Creative Writing concentrations within the English major. Its purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing. Required of English majors. Open to English majors only or others by department permission.


English 3405 (10)—Special Topics in Professional Communication
Instructor
: Susan Lang

Study of principles and practices in technical communication, technical editing, managerial communication, international business communication, visual rhetoric, writing for the web and scientific writing.


English 3405—Special Topics in Professional Communication
Instructor
: Staff

Study of principles and practices in technical communication, technical editing, managerial communication, international business communication, visual rhetoric, writing for the web and scientific writing.


English 3465 (30)—Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing
Instructor
: Memory Risinger

For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing fiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.


English 3465 (20)—Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing
Instructor
: Tyler Sones

For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing fiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.


English 3466 (10)—Special Topics in Intermediate Poetry Writing
Instructor
: Pablo Tanguay

Advancing on what you learned in 2266, we will focus on turning thoughts into poems, turning feelings into poems, turning the world around us into poems. We will read poems and write poems and talk about poems and think about poems. We will be rigorous and thorough and exacting. We will be carefee and flippant and wild. We will be all poem, all the time.


English 3467S (10)—Issues and Methods in Tutoring Writing
Instructor
: Beverly Moss

This course will focus on theories and practices in tutoring writing. The aim of this course is to prepare undergraduates to work with writers from diverse backgrounds and disciplines. This class provides a unique opportunity for its members to learn about composition theory and pedagogy, tutoring strategies and writing center theories and practices in order to put these theories and practices to work in classroom and writing center settings. Students will apprentice as writing consultants in the University Writing Center. Therefore, in addition to regularly scheduled class time, students enrolled in this course will spend approximately one hour per week for six weeks in the Writing Center. Upon completing the course, students are eligible to apply for paid positions in the University Writing Center.


English 3468 (10)—Special Topics in Intermediate Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor
: Steffan Hruby

For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing creative nonfiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.


English 3662 (10)—An Introduction to Literary Publishing
Instructor
: Eliza Smith

An introduction to the theory and practice of editing and publishing literature. Students will engage complex aspects of the literary publishing landscape as writers, readers and editors. This class is aimed at young writers interested in the inner workings of literary magazines and publishing houses, as well as aspiring editors, publicists and agents interested in careers in the publishing industry, either in the "Big Five" houses or for small, independent presses. The course is also for anyone who has a serious interest in the public presentation of literature.

0