Autumn 2018: 2000-Level Courses

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English 2201 (10)—Selected Works of British Literature: Medieval through 1800
Instructor
: Karen Winstead

This survey will introduce students to the vibrant minds and culture that produced the masterpieces of British literary heritage. Students will sample the writings of poets, playwrights, essayists and novelists including Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton and Johnson. Readers will get to know the worlds they inhabited, the issues they cared about and how they may have thought about themselves as artists and human beings. While exploring the past, students will find surprising precedents for popular genres of contemporary times, including horror, romance and graphic narrative. English 2201 is a foundational course for English majors but it is also a rewarding experience for anyone seeking an appreciation of English literary heritage. Lectures will sketch out the contours of literary history, and weekly recitations will provide opportunities for group close reading and discussion. Requirements include a final exam, a journal of responses to the readings and weekly online quizzes on the lectures.

GE: Literature; Diversity (Global Studies)


English 2201—Selected Works of British Literature: Medieval through 1800
Instructor
: Staff

An introductory critical study of the works of major British writers from 800 to 1800.

GE: Literature; Diversity (Global Studies)


English 2220 (10)—Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructor
: Jennifer Higginbotham

Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience.

GE: Literature; Diversity (Global Studies)


English 2220 (20)—Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructor
: Luke Wilson

Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience.

GE: Literature; Diversity (Global Studies)


English 2220 (30)—Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructor
: Hannibal Hamlin

For four centuries now, William Shakespeare has been widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language. We come not to praise Shakespeare, however, but to study him, reading a sampling of his plays, in a variety of genres and over the course of his career. Though literary reviewing of the Siskel and Ebert variety is not our business (thumbs up? thumbs down?), we will want to ask and discuss why Shakespeare has been so highly praised by so many, for so long-what is it that gives his literary work its power and appeal? We will also ask how his plays work as theater; how he adapts and transforms the source material on which so many of his plays depend; how Shakespeare can be such an "original" when he borrows so much from other writers; how he can create such deep and realistic characters; and how it is that Shakespeare can accomplish all of the above (and more) through language. In order to explore these and other questions, we will need to consider a variety of approaches to Shakespeare's plays. Of course, first and foremost, we will be reading some wonderful literature. Plays will include Henry IV Part 1, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Hamlet, Antony and Cleopatra, and Cymbeline, and we’ll also read some poems. Assignments will include two short critical papers, a midterm test, and a final exam.

GE: Literature; Diversity (Global Studies)


English 2220—Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructor
: Staff

Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience.

GE: Literature; Diversity (Global Studies)


English 2220H (10)—Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructor
: Alan Farmer

In this course students will read several plays written by Shakespeare and consider how they both conform to and work against the genres of comedy, tragedy, history and romance. Looking at the plays as works to be both performed and read, the class will pay particular attention to the politics of gender, religion and kingship in the plays, topics that Shakespeare returned to again and again and that were vitally important, and indeed controversial, in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. In addition to some critical and historical essays on the early modern theater and culture, students will read some combination of the following plays: Henry V, Two Gentlemen of Verona, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, Macbeth, Julius Caesar, Coriolanus and the Tempest. Requirements include a midterm exam, final exam, two essays (one shorter, one longer), regular attendance and active participation.

GE: Literature; Diversity (Global Studies)


English 2260 (20)—Introduction to Poetry
Instructor
: Jacob Risinger

Then she opened up a book of poems
And handed it to me
Written by an Italian poet
From the thirteenth century
And every one of them words rang true
And glowed like burnin’ coal
Pourin’ off of every page
Like it was written in my soul.
— Bob Dylan, “Tangled Up In Blue”
 

How can poems written hundreds of years ago still resonate with our experiences of love, grief, anxiety, ecstasy, and apprehension?  This course will serve as an introduction and grand tour of classic and contemporary British and American poetry.  It will also be a course where we think about how poetry intersects with ordinary human life.  Over the course of the semester, we will consider the major themes, forms, contexts, and innovations that have shaped the evolution of poetry.  How has love poetry changed over the four centuries that separate Shakespeare from Seamus Heaney?  Why do poets like William Wordsworth, Langston Hughes, and Bob Dylan turn to the ballad as a form of social and aesthetic critique?  What poetic devices do metaphysical poets like John Donne and pop artists like Katy Perry share in common?

We will read a great deal of poetry, from Shakespeare to current US Poet Laureate Tracy Smith.   No prior familiarity with poetry is necessary.   

GE: Literature

English 2260—Introduction to Poetry
Instructor
: Staff

Designed to help students understand and appreciate poetry through an intensive study of a representative group of poems.

GE: Literature


English 2261 (10)—Introduction to Fiction
Instructor
: Jessica Prinz

Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations; comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.

GE: Literature


English 2261—Introduction to Fiction
Instructor
: Staff

Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations; comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.

GE: Literature


English 2261H (10)—Introduction to Fiction
Instructor
: Francis Donoghue

Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations; comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.

GE: Literature


English 2263 (10)—Introduction to Film
Instructor
: Sean O’Sullivan

Introduction to methods of reading film texts by analyzing cinema as technique, as system and as cultural product.

GE: Visual and Performing Art


English 2263—Introduction to Film
Instructor
: Staff

Introduction to methods of reading film texts by analyzing cinema as technique, as system and as cultural product.

GE: Visual and Performing Art


English 2264 (10)—Introduction to Pop Culture Studies
Instructor
: Alexandra Sterne

Introduction to the analysis of popular culture texts.

GE: Cultures and Ideas
Cross-listed in Comparative Studies


English 2264 (20)—Introduction to Pop Culture Studies
Instructor
: Frank DiPiero

Introduction to the analysis of popular culture texts.

GE: Cultures and Ideas
Cross-listed in Comparative Studies


English 2264 (30)—Introduction to Pop Culture Studies
Instructor
: Pritha Prasad

Introduction to the analysis of popular culture texts.

GE: Cultures and Ideas
Cross-listed in Comparative Studies


English 2265 (10)—Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructor
: Molly Rideout

An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.


English 2265 (20)—Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructor
: Alaina Belisle

An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.


English 2265 (30)—Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructor
: Elizabeth Blackford

An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.


English 2265 (40)—Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructor
: Neil Grayson

An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.


English 2266 (10)—Introductory Poetry Writing
Instructor
: Emmalee Hagarman

An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, composition and prosody; practice in the writing of poetry; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published poems by established poets.


English 2267 (10)—Introduction to Creative Writing
Instructor
: Kelsey Hagarman

An introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction. Analysis and discussion of student work, with reference to the general methods and scope of all three genres.


English 2268 (10)—Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor
: Caroline Angell

An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of creative nonfiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published essays by masters of the many forms of creative nonfiction.


English 2268 (20)—Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor
: Julia Garbuz

An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of creative nonfiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published essays by masters of the many forms of creative nonfiction.


English 2269 (10)—Digital Media Composing
Instructor
: Gavin Johnson

Mobile devices--such as smart phones, computer tablets, and wearable devices--are ubiquitous, rhetorical technologies that we use daily to compose. From text messages to viral videos, we use mobile composing practices to complete everyday tasks while expressing ourselves and engaging our communities. In this course, students will consider the intersections of technologies, composing practices, and identity while producing original material using mobile devices. Our examination of identity will include topics like race, gender, age, sexuality, and disability. Our goal is to not only discuss the possibilities available when composing with mobile technologies but also provide students with a new way to think critically about themselves, their communities, and their mobile devices.
You do not need previous experience with video, audio, or image editing technologies in order to complete class projects; you will receive necessary instruction and practice during the course of the semester.

GE: Visual and Performing Arts


English 2269 (40)—Digital Media Composing
Instructor
: Laura Allen

Mobile devices--such as smart phones, computer tablets, and wearable devices--are ubiquitous, rhetorical technologies that we use daily to compose. From text messages to viral videos, we use mobile composing practices to complete everyday tasks while expressing ourselves and engaging our communities. In this course, students will consider the intersections of technologies, composing practices, and identity while producing original material using mobile devices. Our examination of identity will include topics like race, gender, age, sexuality, and disability. Our goal is to not only discuss the possibilities available when composing with mobile technologies but also provide students with a new way to think critically about themselves, their communities, and their mobile devices.
You do not need previous experience with video, audio, or image editing technologies in order to complete class projects; you will receive necessary instruction and practice during the course of the semester.

GE: Visual and Performing Arts


English 2270—Introduction to Folklore
Instructor
: Staff

Folklore theory and methods explored through engagement with primary sources: folktale, legend, jokes, folksong, festival, belief and art. Folklore minor course.

GE: Cultures and Ideas
Cross-listed with Comparative Studies 2350


 

English 2276—Arts of Persuasion
Instructor
: Staff

Introduces students to the study and practice of rhetoric and how arguments are shaped by technology, media and cultural contexts.

GE: Cultures and Ideas


English 2277—Introduction to Disability Studies
Instructor
: Staff

Foundational concepts and issues in disability studies; introduction to the sociopolitical models of disability.

GE: Cultures and Ideas


English 2280 (10)—The English Bible
Instructor
: James Fredal

In 2280, students will read the Bible pretty much straight through. Not the whole thing, but much of it, to understand what it says, what it doesn’t say, and what it means. The class will talk about the different kinds of Bible literature--myths, tales, laws, poetry, parables, proverbs and the like--and talk about the cultural context in which this literature was written. Students will look at techniques for understanding why the Bible looks the way it does, and some traditional methods of biblical interpretation. If you’ve ever wondered what is in the Bible, or you’ve read the Bible from a religious point of view and want a non-doctrinal perspective, this class will be for you. Students will have an opportunity to read, talk about, ask about and learn about the Bible as an amazing an influential work of literature.  

GE: Literature


English 2281 (10)—Introduction to African-American Literature
Instructor
: Koritha Mitchell

This course will not only introduce students to major figures in African American literature; it will also place these figures in the context of African American history and culture. We will work from the premise that this literary tradition has never existed solely to respond to so-called "dominant" culture and "mainstream" literature. In addition to well-known writers, such as Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston, this course will explore the work of equally important but less widely known authors, such as Harriet Jacobs, Ida B. Wells, Charles Chesnutt and Audre Lorde. All students must invest in both volumes of the Norton Anthology of African American Literature.

GE: Literature; Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

Cross-listed with African American Studies


English 2282 (10)—Introduction to Queer Studies
Instructor
: Lesia Pagulich

Introduces and problematizes foundational concepts of the interdisciplinary field of queer studies, highlighting the intersections of sexuality with race, class and nationality.

GE: Cultures and Ideas; Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
Cross-listed in Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies


English 2282 (20)—Introduction to Queer Studies
Instructor
: Zachary Harvat

Introduces and problematizes foundational concepts of the interdisciplinary field of queer studies, highlighting the intersections of sexuality with race, class and nationality.

GE: Cultures and Ideas; Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
Cross-listed in Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies


English 2291 (10)—US Literature: 1865 to Present
Instructor
: Brian McHale

This course provides a broad survey of American literature over a century and a half, from the aftermath of the Civil War to the new millennium. Examining a wide range of fiction, nonfiction, poetry and drama, the course studies literary engagements with such historical and cultural phenomena as post-Civil War Reconstruction; the expanding social, economic and cultural networks of the late-nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; immigration and internal migration; race and regional identity; the two World Wars and other armed conflicts of the twentieth-century; and the increasingly rapid pace of social and technological changes over the last half-century. Our investigation of literary responses and influences will include attention to such literary genres, trends and movements as the short story, the emergence of new forms of poetry, realism and its variants, modernism and postmodernism.

GE: Literature


English 2367.01—Language, Identity and Culture in the US Experience
Instructor
: Staff

Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America.

GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.); Writing and Communication—Level 2


English 2367.01H (40)—Language, Identity and Culture in the US Experience
Instructor
: Pranav Jani

Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America.

GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.); Writing and Communication—Level 2


English 2367.02—Literature in the US Experience
Instructor
: Staff

Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.

GE: Literature; Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.); Writing and Communication—Level 2


English 2367.02H—Literature in the US Experience
Instructor
: Staff

Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.

GE: Literature; Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.); Writing and Communication—Level 2


English 2367.03—Documentary in the US Experience
Instructor
: Staff

An intermediate course that extends and refines skills in critical reading and expository writing through analysis of written texts, video and documentaries.

GE: Writing and Communication—Level 2


English 2367.05—The US Folk Experience
Instructor
: Staff

Concepts of American folklore and ethnography; folk groups, tradition and fieldwork methodology; how these contribute to the development of critical reading, writing and thinking skills.

GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.); Writing and Communication—Level 2


English 2463—Introduction to Video Game Analysis
Instructor
: Staff

An introduction to humanities-based methods of analyzing and interpreting video games in terms of form, genre, style and theory. No background in video game play is necessary. All students will have regular opportunities for hands-on experience with different game types and genres in both the computer-based classroom and the Department of English Video Game Lab.

GE: Visual and Performing Arts
 

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