Our Courses

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English-2202: Selected Works of British Literature—1800 to Present
Instructor: Jill Galvan and Staff

This course will introduce you to some of the major British texts, authors, and literary forms and trends of the last two centuries. In the process, you will be learning about diverse perspectives on important cultural developments over the past two centuries, including the French Revolution, the abolition of slavery, the Industrial Revolution, imperialism, debates over gender roles and sexuality, the rise of scientific values, the twentieth-century world wars, and decolonization. We will study major literary modes such as the Romantic lyric, the Gothic novel, the dramatic monologue, World War I poetry, postcolonial narrative, and the Bildungsroman (or "coming-of-age novel"). Our fiction and drama will include Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol, Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest, and Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go. Besides providing a good sense of literary history, English 2202 will familiarize you with college-level strategies for analyzing literature - specifically, reading a text with an eye for fine detail and developing convincing interpretations based on textual evidence.

GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English-2202H: Selected Works of British Literature—1800 to Present
Instructor: David Riede

We will be looking at some of the greatest and most influential works of English literature from William Blake's "Songs of Innocence" (1789) to Zadie Smith's "White Teeth" (2000). We will study the works in terms of historical and cultural context and of literary craft, and will look particularly to distinguish the Romantic, Victorian, Modern and post-colonial periods. 

GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English-2220: Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructors: Christopher Highley and Staff

Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English-2220: Introduction to Shakespeare—Reading Shakes. in Performance
Instructors: Manuel Jacquez

Study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English-2220 (40): Introduction to Shakespeare
Instructor: Jennifer Higginbotham

In late sixteenth-century London, on the south bank of the Thames, amongst bear--baiting rings and brothels stood a round wooden theater that brought together people from all walks of life-aristocrats and merchants, cobblers and tailors, seamstresses and fishwives. It was for this space and for these people that William Shakespeare first wrote his influential plays, and in this course, we'll be imagining what it was like to stand with them and watch Shakespeare's theater in action. This particular section of Introduction to Shakespeare will be experimenting on occasion with cutting edge techniques for facilitating embodied learning through the combination of rehearsal room techniques modeled on professional theater companies with close textual analysis of Shakespeare's language. Our in-depth exploration will include comedies, tragedies, and a few of his poems,  not to mention a lot of fun along the way.
GE: Literature

GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English-2220H: Introduction to Shakespeare—Genre, Gender and Kingship
Instructor: Alan Farmer

In this course we will read several plays written by Shakespeare and consider how they both conform to and work against the genres of comedy, tragedy, history, and romance. Looking at the plays as works to be both performed and read, we will pay particular attention to the politics of gender, religion, and kingship in the plays, topics that Shakespeare returned to again and again and that were vitally important, and indeed controversial, in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. In addition to some critical and historical essays on the early modern theater and culture, we will read some combination of the following plays: Henry V, Two Gentlemen of Verona, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, Macbeth, Julius Caesar, Coriolanus and The Tempest.
GE: Literature

GE: Diversity (Global Studies)


English-2260: Introduction to Poetry
Instructor: Benjamin Moran and Staff

Designed to help students understand and appreciate poetry through an intensive study of a representative group of poems. 
GE: Literature

English-2260H: Introduction to Poetry
Instructor: David Riede

This course is intended as an introduction to major poems and poets in the English language, and will examine poems in historical, literary historical and broader cultural contexts. We will be concerned especially with poetic form and craft and the many and various uses of such forms as sonnets, ballads, odes, blank and rhymed verse and so on, and we will also focus on the crafting of voice, tone, imagery, sound and rhythm.
GE: Literature


English-2261: Introduction to Fiction
Instructors: Roxann WheelerZoe Thompson and Staff

Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.
GE: Literature


English-2261: Introduction to Fiction—Representations of Disability
Instructors: Andrew Sydlik
 
Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included.
GE: Literature

English-2261: Introduction to Fiction
Instructors: David Brewer

This course will examine the central building blocks of fiction:  plot, character, narration/point of view, and setting.  We'll also explore how style connects with and contributes to these various building blocks. Our emphasis throughout will be on how fiction works and why we should care about its workings. Likely readings include Donna Tartt's The Secret History, Gillian Flynn's Gone Girl, Truman Capote's In Cold Blood, Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and a range of short stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, Lee K. Abbott, Donald Ray Pollock, Flannery O'Connor, Shirley Jackson, James Thurber, Viet Thanh Nguyen, H. P. Lovecraft, and Claire Voye Watkins.
GE: Literature
 

English-2263 (10): Introduction to Film
Instructor: David Brewer

This course will explore the formal and technological means through which stories are told on film, and how those techniques interact with the film industry and the viewers on which it relies.  Among other things, we'll consider cinematography, editing, mise-en-scene, sound, genre, distribution, exhibition venues, and the star system.  Throughout, our emphasis will be on bringing out and building upon the skills as a viewer that you've already developed over two decades or more of watching. Likely viewing will include Some Like It Hot, The Silence of the Lambs, The Palm Beach Story, Kick-Ass, Rope, Moonrise Kingdom, Singin' in the Rain, Dazed and Confused, Star Wars, Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, High Society, something quite recent and internationally successful, and a documentary (The Story of Film), along with a wide range of clips.
GE: VPA
 

English-2263: Introduction to Film
Instructor: Staff

Introduction to methods of reading film texts by analyzing cinema as technique, as system, and as cultural product. 
GE: VPA
 

English-2264: Introduction to Popular Culture Studies
Instructor: Staff

Introduction to the analysis of popular culture texts.
GE: Cultures & Ideas. 
This is a combined section class. Cross-listed in CompStd


English-2265: Introductory Fiction Writing
Instructors: Elizabeth Blackford, Tyler Sones, Rachel Toliver and Jessica Rafalko

An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition; practice in the writing of fiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published stories by masters of the genre.


English-2266: Introductory Poetry Writing
Instructors: Margaret Cipriano and Babette Cieskowski

An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, composition, and prosody; practice in the writing of poetry; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published poems by established poets.


English-2267: Introduction to Creative Writing
Instructor: Allison Talbot

An introduction to the writing of fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction. Analysis and discussion of student work, with reference to the general methods and scope of all three genres. 


English-2268: Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor: Steffan Hruby

An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, and composition; practice in the writing of creative nonfiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published essays by masters of the many forms of creative nonfiction.


English-2269: Digital Media Composing
Instructor: Staff

A composition course in which students analyze and compose digital media texts while studying complex forms and practices of textual production.
GE: VPA


English-2270: Introduction to Folklore
Instructor: Madeleine Smith

Folklore theory and methods explored through engagement with primary sources: folktale, legend, jokes, folksong, festival, belief, art. Folklore Minor course.
GE: Cultures & Ideas
This is a combined section class


English-227: Arts of Persuasion
Instructor: Gavin Johnson

Introduces students to the study and practice of rhetoric and how arguments are shaped by technology, media and cultural contexts. 
 

GE: Cultures & Ideas


English-2277: Introduction to Disability Studies
Instructor: Staff

This course investigates the ways that disability is composed in contemporary life. We’ll think about disabled people in terms of identity and culture, but we’ll also think about the way disability itself functions to shape our ideas about ourselves, and others. What does it mean when you taste food and say, “That’s crazy good”? What does it mean when you break your ankle and spend a few months using crutches?  Our purpose is not to say, “This way of speaking or behaving is good, and that other way of speaking or behaving is bad.” Rather, our purpose is to ask, over and over again: How does disability make meaning in contemporary life?  We will explore various models of disability, paying attention to the ways that each model intersects with race, gender, class and sexuality. We’ll theorize concepts such as normal, passing, inspiration and access, and consider how these concepts both emerge and are contested through individual authors’ and artists’ composing practices.

GE: Cultures & Ideas


English-2280: The English Bible—The Bible as Literature
Instructor: Bethany Christiansen

In this class, we approach the Bible as a literary text, rather than as a religious text, though naturally, the theological and the spiritual will be part of our discussions. This is not a course in religion, but in literature, and particularly, on the interpretation of the Bible through history. The Jewish and Christian scriptures contained in the Bible, in various forms, are perhaps the most important writings of the Western world. We examine how the texts included in the Bible came to be as historical artefacts, and we analyze the wild and wonderful stories it contains as fundamental to western literary and cultural heritage. The objectives of this course are for the students to gain an understanding of Biblical literary forms (poetry, mythology, eyewitness testimony), and an understanding of the Bible as interpretable through the ages (spanning from Jewish biblical commentaries through biblical literalists of the present-day US).
GE: Literature


English-2281: Introduction to African-American Literature
Instructor: Martin Ponce

This course introduces students to the major periods and authors of the African American literary tradition from the colonial period to our contemporary moment. In this survey, we will read texts in a wide range of genres (poetry, autobiographies, novels, short stories, nonfiction essays) that engage with an equally broad array of topics and issues, including slavery and freedom, orality and literacy, music and literature, gender and sexuality, political protest and artistic innovation, and the persistence of structural racism and racial violence into the present. We will examine literature from the period of chattel slavery in the Americas, through Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, the Harlem Renaissance, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Black Arts Movement, postmodernism, and the contemporary. 
GE: Literature
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
This is a combined lecture class. Cross-listed in AfAmASt


English-2282: Introduction to Queer Studies
Instructors: Jian Chen

Introduces and problematizes foundational concepts of the interdisciplinary field of queer studies, highlighting the intersections of sexuality with race, class, and nationality. 
GE: Cultures & Ideas

GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
This is a combined section class. Cross-listed in WGSSt


English-2367.01: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience
Instructors: Edgar Singleton, Martha Sims and Staff

Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)


English-2367.01: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience—Video Games
Instructors: Nathan Richards

Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)


English-2367.01: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience—Video Games
Instructors: Joshua Zirl
 
Extends and refines expository writing and analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

English-2367.01H: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience
Instructor: Nancy Johnson

Extends and refines expository writing & analytical reading skills, emphasizing recognition of intertextuality and reflection on compositional strategies on topics pertaining to education and pop culture in America.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)


English-2367.01S: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience—Literacy Narratives of Black Columbus 
Instructor: Beverly Moss

Participants in this course will read about the importance of undertaking life-history and literacy narrative projects, with a particular focus on preserving the history of Columbus-area Black communities.  Collecting (and analyzing) literacy narratives-or literacy stories-is an important research strategy that can be used to document the history and current activities of any community.  It is especially important in Black communities where their/our literacy practices have often been under-reported or negatively characterized.  Collecting literacy narratives also provides an opportunity for community members to have a voice in telling their stories.  In this course-which welcomes community members and volunteers-students will learn about collecting and preserving the life-history narratives of Black Columbus, focusing specifically on stories having to do with literacy practices occurring in the Black business and activist communities.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)


English-2367.02: Literature in the U.S. Experience
Instructor: Adeleke Adeeko, Jennifer Patton and Staff

Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.
GE: Literature
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)


English-2367.02 (110): Literature in the U.S. ExperienceCanonical Works: The "Great" Literary Tradition
Instructor: Jessica Prinz

All sessions of English 2367 have the same subject: diversity in U.S. Literature. This class has not only a subject but also a thesis. While the up-to-date concern for  diversity would seem apt for new forms of literature and contemporary modes of art, I will argue that diversity has always been a subject for Twentieth-Century U.S. authors. Such "canonical" works (those texts deemed to be part of the "great" tradition)  have always treated the theme of diversity. Thus, such writers like Hemingway and Faulkner, Morrison and Ellison all address the diverse nature of life in the U.S. This quarter we?ll see some of the following: ethnic diversity (African-American, Native American, Asian American and Jewish); literature about disabilities (injured veterans; blindness, autism, depression; alcoholism); the insane and the temporarily insane; the victims of racism, prejudice, and violence. Many works also consider traditionally denigrated groups, like women and homosexuals. The conclusion here is  that such diversity in literature (as in life) calls for a good deal of tolerance and compassion, and  it exercises our capacity for empathy and understanding.
GE: Literature
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)


English-2367.02H: Literature in the U.S. Experience
Instructors: Pranav Jani

Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.GE: Literature
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)


English 2367.03: Documentary in the U.S. Experience—Documenting the U.S. Food Experience
Instructor: Carl Laamen

An intermediate course that extends and refines skills in critical reading and expository writing through analysis of written texts, video and documentaries.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)


English 2367.03H: Documentary in the U.S. Experience—The Rhetoric of Documentary Film

Instructor: Roger Cherry

English 2367.03H is an intermediate writing course that extends and refines skills in expository writing, argumentation, critical reading, and critical thinking. We will watch several film documentaries, examining the rhetorial strategies employed by the filmmakers.  The class focuses on rhetorical analysis and persuasive writing and employs a discussion format for discussing course readings and documentaries.
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)


English-2367.05: The U.S. Folk Experience—English and Scottish Ballad in the U.S.
Instructor: Christofer Johnson

Concepts of American folklore and ethnography; folk groups, tradition, and fieldwork methodology; how these contribute to the development of critical reading, writing and thinking skills.
GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)
GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)


English-2463: Introduction to Video Games Analysis
Instructor: Staff

An introduction to humanities-based methods of analyzing and interpreting video games in terms of form, genre, style and theory. No background in video game play is necessary. All students will have regular opportunities for hands-on experience with different game types and genres in both the computer-based classroom and the Department of English Video Game Lab.
GE: VPA

 

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