Our Courses

3000-level

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English-3271 (10): Structure of the English Language
Instructor: Gabriella Modan

This course is an introduction to English linguistics. We will learn about the basic characteristics of language: the sounds of English and how they're put together, word formation processes, and rules for combining words into utterances/sentences.  While studying how the basic building blocks of language work, we will also investigate linguistic variation, accents of American English, and language and education.  Finally, we'll explore how standard and non-standard varieties of English get evaluated in the US, and the implications of such evaluations in educational settings.

GE: Cultures & Ideas


English-3271 (20): Structure of the English Language
Instructor: Lauren Squires

Students learn basic characteristics of English linguistics focusing on the basic building blocks of language; the sounds of English and how they are put together, word formation processes, and rules for combining words into utterances/sentences. Students investigate and explore linguistic variation, accents of American English, and the implications of language evaluation in educational settings.

GE: Cultures & Ideas


English-3304: Business and Professional Writing
Instructor: Christiane Buuck and Staff

The study of principles and practices of business and professional writing.


English-3304: Business and Professional WritingPrinciples and Practices
Instructor: Michael Blancato

In this course you will learn principles and practices associated with writing well in business and professional contexts. I’ll provide you with a feedback on your prose and give you several opportunities to refine your style, organization and collaborative writing strategies. Most of our in-class time will involve workshopping course deliverables and writing collaboratively.


English-3304: Business and Professional Writing
Instructor: Christa Teston

In this course you will learn principles and practices associated with writing well in business and professional contexts. I’ll provide you with a lot of feedback on your prose and give you several opportunities to refine your style, organization, and collaborative writing strategies. Most of our in-class time will involve workshopping course deliverables and writing collaboratively. 
 
At the end of this course, you will have writing samples that demonstrate expertise with the following genres, 
  • correspondence genres (letters, memos, social media); 
  • presentation genres (pitches, pecha kucha, slideware); 
  • collaboration genres (charter document, strategic plan); 
  • information genres (reports, documentation, public service announcements, fact sheets); 
  • proposal genres (project proposals, marketing proposals); 
  • employment search genres (resume, cover letter, interview techniques)
Research suggests that the best way to learn how to write professionally is to practice composing for meaningful, real world contexts, audiences, and purposes. In this class, therefore, you will practice rhetorically sound, professional writing by partnering with a real world client. You will have an opportunity to meet this client’s marketing and communication needs while negotiating budgetary and time constraints. 

English-3305: Technical Writing
Instructor: Staff

Study of principles and practices of technical writing. Emphasis on the style, organization, and conventions of technical and research reports, proposals, memoranda, professional correspondence, etc.


English-3331: Thinking Theoretically
Instructor: Sandra MacPherson

This course will introduce students to theoretical work on the Anthropocene—a new geologic epoch characterized by the catastrophic effects of human action on the Earth’s ecosystems. There is as yet no agreed upon origin point for the Anthropocene: scholars and scientists point to the Industrial Revolution (c. 1760), to the transoceanic movement of species during the colonization of the Americas (c. 1610), and to the “Great Acceleration” (c.1950), that is, expansions in human population, the development of novel materials (plastics!), and fallout from nuclear bomb testing following WWII. There are also a number of disciplinary approaches to the problem of climate change, and over the course of the semester we will survey the different modes of theoretical thinking that go along with them: natural history, multispecies ethnography, social history, ecological theory, popular journalism, anthropology, climate change activism, and of course, art. We will consider the cultural objects of the Anthropocene from the seventeenth century to the present, asking how art itself ‘thinks theoretically,’ and what genres and forms of human making might work to conceptualize the end of human existence.


English-3361: Narrative and Medicine
Instructor: Jared Gardner

Study of fictional and nonfictional narratives offering diverse perspectives on such medical issues as illness, aging, treatment, health and healing, and doctor-patient relationships. 

GE: Literature


English-3364: Special Topics in Popular Culture—History of the Comic Book in the U.S., 1933-2017
Instructor: Jared Gardner

This class will examine the history of periodical comics in the U.S, from the rise of the modern comic book form in the 1930s (and its immediate predecessors) to the underground comix revolution of the 1960s to the mini-comics and self-publishing movements of the 80s and 90s, to the transformations in American comics in the 21-century following the "Comics Crash" of the 1990s and the coming of the digital revolution. This class will focus as well on a wide range of genres, including superhero, crime, horror, and romance - as well as autobiographical, historical, educational and political comics. 

GE: Cultures & Ideas


English-3372: Science Fiction and/or Fantasy
Instructor: Elizabeth Hewitt and Staff

Stories about the end of the world have circulated for just as long as there have been stories. But authors became increasingly likely to write post-apocalyptic fiction in the aftermath of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, and these narratives have only become more popular in the 21st century with the urgency of climate change. This course will study some of the most influential post-apocalyptic fiction published between 1945 and 2013. Likely texts will include: Miller’s A Canticle for Leibowitz, Ballard’s The Drowned World, Disch’s The Genocides, LeGuin’s Lathe of Heaven, Butler’s Parable of the Sower, Atwood’s Oryx and Crake, McCarthy’s The Road and Lee’s On Such a Full Sea. We will consider the ways these speculative texts provide commentary on human catastrophe, natural crisis and social devolution. We will ask what difference the details make when authors construct their own versions of this archetypal plot? What can this particular subgenre of science fiction tell us about purposes of literary speculation? 

GE: Literature


English-3372 (30): Science Fiction and/or FantasyTolkien's Monsters
Instructor: Merrill Kaplan

Tolkien`s bestiary of wights, wargs, balrogs, and nazguls is half the fun of his books. Add the "races" of elves, dwarves, hobbits, orcs, and men and there is a lot to talk about. What is a monster and what do monsters mean? What are the relationships between Tolkien`s monsters and the elves, dragons, and trolls of folklore and medieval epic? How have Tolkien`s ideas about race affected subsequent fantasy literature and games? In looking at monsters, we`ll examine the boundaries of the human and explore the violent language of dehumanization. We`ll hew to the books, not the movies, and readings will include the Hobbit, the Lord of the Rings trilogy, Tolkien`s essay "The Monsters and the Critics," modern theoretical works on monstrosity and about race, and comparative texts from folklore and medieval literature.

GE: Literature


English-3378: Special Topics in Film and Literature—Shakespeare and Film
Instructor: Alan Farmer

In this course, we will study some of the most innovative and influential films ever made of Shakespeare's plays.  We will read specific plays and view films that cut across dramatic genres, time periods, countries, and cinematic styles, by such directors as Max Reinhardt (Austria and Germany), Laurence Olivier (England), Akira Kurosawa (Japan), Baz Luhrmann (Australia), Michael Almereyda (U.S.), Al Pacino (U.S.), and Julie Taymor (U.S.). We will focus on how directors and actors have chosen to adapt Shakespeare for performance, but also consider how these films have shaped, and continue to shape, the cultural meaning of "Shakespeare" for modern audiences.  
GE: Cultures & Ideas


English-3379: Methods for the Study of Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy
Instructor: Nancy Johnson

Introduction to the interrelated fields of Writing, Rhetoric, and Literacy, familiarizing students with key concepts that underlie work in these interrelated fields and to the scholarly methods of WRL. Together, this discipline studies the ways people use language and other symbols to convey messages, persuade audiences, and create meaning, and how these practices are learned and taught. 

English-3398 (20): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor: Jessica Prinz

The purpose of this course is to read broadly in the history of American and British literature with the goal of improving reading and writing skills. All key genres of literature will be considered (fiction, drama, and poetry). We will also devote a significant portion of the class to the various theories used to analyze literature ("critical theory"). 


English-3398 (30): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor: Leslie Lockett

English 3398 is about developing arguments that speak to an academic audience beyond the classroom. This course is designed to build the skills needed for the advanced study of literature, especially the close reading of literary texts, familiarity with various genres of literature, the use of literary-critical methods and other scholars' research in developing one's analysis of texts, and the construction of clear and insightful essays about literature. We will practice several approaches to literary criticism, from close reading and historicist criticism to ecocriticism, deconstruction, and psychological criticism. We will study texts from across several literary genres, including poems, short stories, drama, and the novel.


English-3398 (40): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor: Jennifer Higginbotham

This is a course about what we read, why we read, and how we read. As an introduction to the critical study of literature, this class aims to help students gain the skills necessary to succeed as English majors and minors, including close reading, understanding genre, working with poetry, and writing English essays.

English-3398 (60): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor: Elizabeth Hewitt

This course's purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing. 


English-3398 (70): Methods for the Study of Literature
Instructor: Sandra MacPherson

This course's purpose is to familiarize students with literary studies in such a way as to prepare them for advanced courses in all literary fields and the genres of Creative Writing. 


English-3405 (10) : Special Topics in Professional Communication—Technical Editing
Instructor: Jonathan Buehl

This course will introduce students to a continuum of technical editing practices: developmental editing, comprehensive editing, focused editing (for style, structure, design, etc.), copyediting, and proofreading. Through individual and collaborative projects, you will learn editing and publication-management strategies, and you will apply these strategies in both print and electronic publishing contexts. We will also discuss the ethical and legal aspects of technical editing and the social and organizational factors that affect editorial practices. 

English-3465 (10): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction WritingToward a Single and Unique Effect 
Instructor:  David Bukspan 

The primary challenge in writing fiction, much more than filling a page, is making choices. It’s about asking the right questions and exploring different answers. But how to know what questions to ask, let alone how to answer? Edgar Allan Poe wrote that every aspect of a short story should be somehow contributing to “a single and unique effect.” Every word, every image, every detail about the characters and the setting and the plot should be chosen to help create a particular result. So okay, maybe “every” is a pretty tall order, but you get the idea. Fiction is a big sea, with all kinds of weird animals below the vast surface. In your Introduction to Fiction Writing, if not earlier, you started wading into the water, hopefully beginning to recognize how the elements of plot and point of view and character and setting and style and so on work together, impacting one another. Pushing this metaphor a little further, you can think of this class as dive boat, and each week we’ll look around. We’ll use The Anchor Book of New American Short Stories, an anthology of noteworthy recent domestic short fiction, as more of a net than an anchor, having a look at samples of the state of the art. We can think of Rust Hill’s Writing in General and the Short Story in Particular then as part field guide, part instruction manual. It will teach us not only to recognize how the stories we read work, but how we, too, can learn to swim better, move through the waters with more confidence and success.

English-3465 (20): Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction WritingJourneys Elsewhere: Travelers, Expats and Other Roamers in Fiction

Instructor:  Mallory Laurel

A close study of stories about characters in foreign places, with a focus on the experiences of American travelers. We will read for technique while asking how these narratives use travel to address issues of identity and nationality, foreignness, home, culture, history, and language. Students will have the chance to explore these themes in their own writing through exercises and workshops during the semester. Readings may include: Leaving the Atocha Station by Ben Lerner, Motion Sickness by Lynne Tillman, Giovanni's Room by James Baldwin, Two Serious Ladies by Jane Bowles, The Apartment by Greg Baxter, The Mosquito Coast by Paul Theroux and other selected writings. Additional narrative media may include Sofia Coppola's Lost in Translation.


English-3466: Special Topics in Intermediate Poetry Writing
Instructor: Jessica Lieberman

For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing poetry. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.


English-3467S: Issues and Methods in Tutoring Writing
Instructor: Genie Giaimo

This course trains students to be effective tutors in the OSU Writing Center or within the Writing Associates Program, which includes learning and applying strategies for working with writers of all levels and writing at all stages of completion and comprehension. Through observation-work, students will learn about the day-to-day activities of a University Writing Center, and how tutors conduct themselves during their sessions with clients. Additionally, we will discuss different strategies that will help tutors as they work with English Language Learners. Students will also be trained in face-to-face and online tutoring methods, as well as individual and group tutoring methods.  Ultimately, this course should help students to feel more confident in their roles as writing consultants, and will shed insight into consulting strategies. This course is discussion-based and aims to engage students' areas of interest and expertise to the formal study of writing, literacy, and writing centers. This course will offer training in research methods and data analysis and will use the Writing Center as a research space, with a hands-on practical learning component that includes observation, supervised tutoring and, ultimately concludes with employment opportunities at the OSU Writing Center or within the Writing Associates Program. 

English-3468: Special Topics in Intermediate Creative Nonfiction Writing
Instructor: Elizabeth Rose-Cohen

For students who have experience with the basic elements of writing creative nonfiction. Special topics focus on particular aspects of the genre; advanced techniques are explored.


English-3662: An Introduction to Literary Publishing
Instructor: Jacob Scheier-Schwartz

An introduction to the theory and practice of editing and publishing literature. 

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